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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 773 5 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 581 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 468 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 457 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 450 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 400 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 388 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 344 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 319 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 312 12 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for James Longstreet or search for James Longstreet in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
ang out. I was the only private left of Company A, Seventeenth Virginia, and, having no comrade to lock bayonets with, I ran mine into the ground. The only officer left in my command was Lieutenant Tom Perry. A mild-mannered, slow-speaking man was Tom, but he was a soldier, every inch of him. He never made a boast in his life, but in every battle in which the Seventeenth was engaged, there, in front of his company, stood Tom, calm and serene, as if waiting for the dinner-horn to blow. Longstreet's old First Brigade—that which charged through the abattis at Seven Pines, 2,800 strong—mustered only 320 men. The Seventeenth Virginia, the pride of Alexandra, Prince William, Fairfax, Fauquier and Warren counties, which at Blackburn's Ford had 860 men in ranks, now stood in their tracks with 41 muskets and 7 officers. My! my! What a set of ragamuffins they looked! It seemed as if every cornfield in Maryland had been robbed of its scarecrows and propped up against that fence. None had
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
ersation to which you refer is clear. General Longstreet told me more than once that immediately of the Federal armies. General Lee gave General Longstreet a copy of the letter and asked him to giterview between himself and General Lee. General Longstreet said to me: I told General Lee that in m to whom such a message must be sent. General Longstreet took the letter to his own quarters, wheto Washington with the combined forces. General Longstreet told me of the circumstances more than ollan. The copy which General Lee gave General Longstreet was sent, after the war, to Colonel Marsoriginal letter. I forgot to say that General Longstreet strongly advised General Lee to meet Genellan wanted. I have this moment heard of Longstreet's death Saturday at Gainesville. He often clieve in placing the blame on the Lord, said Longstreet. We ought to have whipped the Yankees, resfore, not difficult for General Cobb and General Longstreet in 1862 to believe that in proposing an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
wanted me. When I got to him he had dismounted, and was standing in the entrance way. He asked me if I was the commanding officer. I replied that Colonel Duncan was. He said: Send for him. Before Duncan arrived he got on his horse so that he could be better heard, and then in loud, exciting voice, said: Men, the salvation of Lee's army is in your keeping; you must realize the responsibility, and your duty; don't surrender this fort; if you can hold the enemy in check for two hours, Longstreet, who is making a forced march, will be here, and the danger to the army in the trenches will be averted. The artillery of the Federals cut short his speech. The response was: Tell General Lee that Fort Gregg will never be surrendered. The cannonading lasted about thirty minutes. Our two pieces did not fire more than two shots before both guns were dismounted, and the gunners took shelter in the bomb-proof. When the cannonading ceased, the infantry advanced in beautiful order unti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Biographical sketch of Major-General Patrick. R. Cleburne. (search)
ion habitually formed the vanguard in advance and the rearguard in retreat. The battle of Chickamauga—an Indian name, which signifies the river of death—wrote the bloodiest page in the history of Western battles. General Bragg, re-enforced by Longstreet's Corps from Virginia, on the 19th and 20th of September, engaged and, after an obstinate contest, defeated Rosecrans' army, which, routed and demoralized, retreated within its line of works at Chattanooga. In this battle Cleburne's Division bhe Federal government dispatched General Grant to succeed Rosecrans in command, and recalled Sherman's army from Mississippi to re-enforce him. On the 24th of November Grant, re-enforced by Sherman, attacked Bragg, weakened by the detachment of Longstreet's Corps, and carried the position of the Confederate left on Lookout Mountain. On the 25th a general attack was made upon the Confederate line. The right wing, under my command, consisted of four divisions—Cleburne's on the extreme right. Th<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Generals are all passing away. (search)
d able General Rodes. 2. The death of General Longstreet and of General Gordon has caused some corge, so freely made, that the censure of General Longstreet originated with those who opposed his pof Gettysburg by obstinately refusing to take Longstreet's advice was first published by Swinton, in ch appeared in 1866, and the author gave General Longstreet as his authority for his statements. Son soon after the battle of Gettysburg by General Longstreet to his uncle, in which he clearly makes harge against Lee, and intimates that if he (Longstreet) had been in command victory, instead of faie. There was a bitter controversy between Longstreet and Early in the New Orleans papers, and thewho were in the battle of Gettysburg. General Longstreet afterwards published his views in The Ceious Confederates, and elaborate defenses of Longstreet from Mr. P. J. Moran, whom the man left as aable papers that has appeared is a review of Longstreet's book by Colonel F. R. Henderson, of the Br[5 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Captain Don P. Halsey, C. S. A. (search)
that sad event, Lieutenant Halsey was promoted from second lieutenant to first, and this rank he held until the following spring, when at the re-organization of his company he withdrew and went as a volunteer aide-de-camp upon the staff of General Longstreet, his company, with four others of his regiment under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel T. T. Munford, having belonged to Longstreet's Brigade. This position he held but a short time, being soon commissioned as aide on General Garland's staLongstreet's Brigade. This position he held but a short time, being soon commissioned as aide on General Garland's staff. His efficiency as a staff officer was such as to elicit golden opinions from every general upon whose staff he was employed, and while doubtless his advancement in rank would have been greater if he had continued as a line officer and remained with Virginia troops, his usefulness to the cause he loved so devotedly was such as to deserve promotion to high rank even if he did not receive it. The rules of the service, however, were such that promotion for staff officers was hard to obtain, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
e death of my corps commander, the brave General Longstreet. Early in the morning Pickett's VirgiLater, General Pickett was informed from General Longstreet's headquarters that Colonel Alexander woould do, but could not stop the stampede. Longstreet and Freemantle. General Pickett directed me to ride to General Longstreet and say that the position against which he had been sent would be tements be sent to him. As I rode back to General Longstreet I passed small parties of Pettigrew's co appearances were against me. I found General Longstreet sitting on a fence alone; the fence ran the message as sent by General Pickett. General Longstreet said: Where are the troops that were plarse in front of the General, and saying: General Longstreet, General Lee sent me here, and said you would not have missed it for the world. General Longstreet answered: I would, Colonel Freemantle; ted and when my horse had made two leaps, General Longstreet called: Captain Bright! I checked my ho
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of army life with General Lee. (search)
h. To obviate the disagreeable feeling and to prevent chafing, we rubbed them around smooth-barked saplings. On the winter marches we fared wretchedly, for our clothing was not overly warm, nor was it material that would turn water readily. When we got into camp we were soon comfortable before huge fires. When we retired it was on the side of the fire over which the smoke curled, as affording us more warmth. On the march once near Culpeper Courthouse, we tried a plan suggested by General Longstreet and never repeated it again. We built a large fire and allowed it to burn down. We then raked it off clean, spread some pine straw, on this a blanket, and, wrapped in another blanket, we slept like a top; in fact, too warm. We sweltered, and next day had violent influenza, and suffered acutely. In the absence of pocket handkerchiefs we had to slip our nose on our rough coat sleeves, which soon produced an inflamed organ, rivaling John Barleycorn in that respect. Our clothes, m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Crenshaw Battery, (search)
iled to kill or wound. Having loaded down the gun carriages and caissons with the plunder we had captured, Captain Crenshaw directed the head of the battery to move out into the road leading to the old Manassas battlefield, which we reached the 27th of August, and here, on the 28th, 29th, and 30th was fought Second Manassas, one of the most desperate and hard-fought battles of the campaign, where Jackson's Corps alone held the whole of Pope's army at bay for nearly two days, until Longstreet could unite with him. The Crenshaw Battery played no small part in this severe battle, but did not suffer a great deal because it fired from a concealed position most of the time. Capture of Harper's Ferry. Still driving Pope's army, the battery moved on to Harper's Ferry with the army, and reached there on the 15th of September, when the place was invested, guns being put in position on Maryland Heights, Bolivar Heights, and Loudoun Heights. A furious cannonade was soon opened, but
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), North Carolina and Virginia. (search)
e could see the whole movement with distinctness. He says this in his official report: General Longstreet ordered forward the column of attack, consisting of Pickett's and Heth's Divisions, in twockett's on the right to understand clearly what General Lee here says. We next quote from General Longstreet's report, who was standing not very far from General Lee, and saw the whole movement. He ho were not killed or wounded. Surely, comment here is unnecessary, and no one who has read Longstreet's book will accuse him of partiality to Virginians. We next quote from the report of that ged of that by General Trimble, then commanded his own North Carolina brigade. He says: General Longstreet ordered me to form in the rear of the right of Heth's Division, commanded by General Petti not only at variance with the report of General Lane, but also with those of Generals Lee and Longstreet, both of whom confirm General Lane in the statement that Pettigrew's men gave way before those
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