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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official correspondence of Governor Letcher, of Virginia. (search)
for drafting them for the war, unless they volunteer for that period. The great object of the Confederate States is to bring the war to a successful issue. Every consideration should yield to that; for without it we can hope to enjoy nothing that we possess, and nothing that we do possess will be worth enjoying without it. I have also wished to speak of one of our best officers. Colonel Carter L. Stevenson. He has been and still is in Western Virginia, acting as Adjutant-General of General Loring. He ought to be at the head of a regiment. He is a faithful, energetic officer, and at this time I should suppose not wanted in his present position. Cannot he get a Virginia regiment, with Lieutenant-Colonel S. Bassett French as Lieutenant-Colonel, and be sent out here? I want troops badly, and want them for the war. I fear Colonel French will get sick if he remains longer in Richmond, and you would be obliged to give him up then. Our enemy here is very strong, and his fleet all-
y to quiet the Indians, and prevent their employment by the Mormons, and to induce traders to bring cattle and horses to camp. These expeditions were all fruitful in good results. Captain Marcy's command, deemed a forlorn hope when it started, after many struggles against storms and starvation in the mountains, finally reached Fort Union, New Mexico, safe, but greatly weakened. Early in the spring Captain Marcy returned with numerous head of sheep and horses, escorted by cavalry under Colonel Loring, to guard against a threatened movement of the Mormons. The success of these expeditions through Bridger's Pass led in the spring to the opening by the Sixth Infantry of the route up Lodge-Pole Creek, through Bridger's Pass and down Bitter Creek; and that summer, as the road was shorter, easier, and better for grass, the Overland Stage Line and Pony Express were transferred to it from the Laramie route. Thus was opened the route afterward adopted by the Union Pacific Railroad. General
ment was always disagreeable to its representatives, yet such were General Johnston's exact justice and circumspection of conduct that no commander has held this department with less detraction. General Porter says in his letter to the writer: The army had now nothing to do but to maintain discipline and efficiency, and be ready for any emergency. Yet General Johnston availed himself of every occasion to display force where its presence would have a good influence. He sent Colonel Loring to New Mexico by a new route directly across the mountains, through the Ute tribes. He dispatched a force to the southern part of the Territory to the scene of the Mountain Meadows massacre, that the guilty might feel that a power was close at hand to prevent or punish such crimes in future. He sent a large and well-provided force to Oregon, and another to California, taking care they should pass through the regions least frequented by troops. He had the country south of Salt Lake exp
gan county, and, in spite of great suffering among the troops, had forced the Federal garrisons at Bath and Romney to retire, and accomplished all his ends. General Loring was then left at Romney, and Jackson returned to Winchester. All that is well known. What follows is not known to many. General Loring conceived an intenseGeneral Loring conceived an intense enmity for Jackson, and made such representations at Richmond, that an order was sent to Loring direct, not through Jackson, commanding in the Valley, recalling him. Jackson at once sent in his resignation. The scene which took place between him and his friend Colonel Boteler, thereupon, was a stormy one. The Colonel in vain trLoring direct, not through Jackson, commanding in the Valley, recalling him. Jackson at once sent in his resignation. The scene which took place between him and his friend Colonel Boteler, thereupon, was a stormy one. The Colonel in vain tried to persuade him that he ought to recall his resignation. No, sir, exclaimed Jackson, striding fiercely up and down, I will not hold a command upon terms of that sort. I will not have those people at Richmond interfering in my plans, and sending orders to an officer under me, without even informing me. No soldier can endure i
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
ons under the most favorable auspices. General Loring, accompanied by his staff, left Richmond o execution of the movement contemplated by General Loring, he seemed to regard the formation of a dline abounded in beef and grain. While General Loring was preparing to advance, we will take a vre actively engaged in fortifying it. When General Loring arrived, about the 12th of August, the Fedes were at this time about equal in numbers. Loring's force was now six thousand, General Jackson'al Anderson, with two Tennessee regiments from Loring's command, was to support him; while General Jfailure, Anderson and Donaldson were to rejoin Loring, and Rust was to find his way back to Jackson.that quarter himself. He, therefore, directed Loring to detach Gilliam with his own regiment (the bl Lee naturally expected to be attacked before Loring could come up; he, therefore, actively employes. Soon after his return to Huntersville, General Loring was instructed to report to General T. J. [15 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Vicksburg during the siege. (search)
n March made a move down the Tallahatchie, but were repulsed by General Loring at Fort Pemberton. General Pemberton, in command of the Departm3d he marched to Hankinson's Ferry, on the Big Black, and there met Loring and his division, sent from Jackson by Pemberton, whose headquartermovable army of Pemberton, consisting of the divisions of Bowen and Loring, which had come up from Grand Gulf, and Stevenson, who was detacheded, but unavailing. General Pemberton lays the blame of defeat on Loring, who declined to reinforce the Confederate left. For this same inaction General Loring is equally praised by Johnston. The field was lost, and Loring, after guarding the retreat of the army across the creek,Loring, after guarding the retreat of the army across the creek, and seeing the bridge burned, moved out by a wide detour and joined General Johnston with his division. Next day the Federals, crossing Bake that he departed no further from his immediate orders than did General Loring from his at Edwards' Depot, an act of independence for which Ge
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Van Dorn, the hero of Mississippi. (search)
on our way we briskly marched for Ripley, where we drew up in line of battle and awaited the enemy; but he not advancing, we marched to Holly Springs. When, in November, Van Dorn checked Grant's advance, he then occupied the works on the Tallahatchie, which he held for a month — Grant's force was sixty thousand, Van Dorn's was sixteen thousand. He then retired behind the Yallabusha to Grenada., and awaited Grant's advance until Christmas eve, 1862, when, leaving the army at Grenada, under Loring's command, he moved with two thousand horse around Grant's army, swooped down upon Holly Springs, captured the garrison, destroyed three months stores for sixty thousand men, and defeated Grant's whole campaign and compelled him to abandon Mississippi. From that time Van Dorn resumed his proper role as a general of cavalry, in which he had no superior in either army. His extrication of his cavalry division from the bend of Duck river, equaled his conduct in the forks of the Hatchie. In
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson and his men. (search)
fer to the resignation of General Jackson in January, 1862, by which the Confederacy nearly lost his services. This step was caused by the insubordination of General Loring, who now holds a command under the Khedive of Egypt. General Loring had served in Mexico as General Jackson's senior in rank, and he was impatient at being hGeneral Loring had served in Mexico as General Jackson's senior in rank, and he was impatient at being his subordinate in Virginia. Being ordered to Romney by General Jackson, after the Bath trip, he prevailed on the War Department to countermand the order. General Jackson promptly resigned, and there was at once a storm. The army became excited, the people of the Valley indignant; Jackson was cool and immovable. The Governor of Virginia interposed, and the Secretary of War yielded. Loring was sent elsewhere, and Jackson resumed his command, and this was the last time the War Department ever undertook to interfere with his proper authority. There are one or two incidents connected with the campaigns of General Jackson which press upon me for recogni
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
is own brigade was promptly sent to him, and one of the brigades of Loring's troops (General Loring had succeeded General Lee) reached him earGeneral Loring had succeeded General Lee) reached him early in December. Subsequently two more brigades, under General Loring himself, were added, but all these troops only increased the small forceGeneral Loring himself, were added, but all these troops only increased the small force of three thousand State militia, which he had assembled in the district itself, to about eleven thousand men. The greater part of General LorGeneral Loring's force did not arrive at Winchester until Christmas, thus preventing any important movements during November and December. But, meantimethe enterprise, and determined to go into winter quarters. Leaving Loring and his troops at Romney, he returned with his old brigade to Winchr from the Secretary of War, sent without consultation, to withdraw Loring from that place.--Jackson obeyed the order, and at --once resigned,im. For the next month Jackson remained quietly at Winchester. General Loring and all his troops that were not Virginians were ordered elsewh
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 8: winter campaign in the Valley. 1861-62. (search)
cements arrived from that army, under Brigadier-General Loring, consisting of the brigades of Colone been indicated, that the late arrival of General Loring's brigades, and the refusal of the Governmow pushed along the direct road, headed by General Loring, while Colonels Maury and Campbell advanceforces, sending a part of his cavalry, and General Loring's column, towards Hancock; the second Virgng, January 5th, having been reinforced by General Loring, they drove away the guard, destroyed the nd it was to be immediately connected with General Loring's forces by a new line of telegraph. Romndanger; and that now, while the command of General Loring was left in mid-winter in an alpine region General Jackson left the old brigade with General Loring, and brought away a part of his troops, whof confidence in my capacity to judge when General Loring's troops should fall back; and it is an at aggravated by a diminution of his force. General Loring having been assigned to a distant field of[12 more...]
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