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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
alley of the Mississippi. From Vicksburg the President visited General Pemberton's army in the extensive position it was intrenching near Grenada,--so extensive that it is fortunate for us, probably, that General Grant was prevented from trying its strength. In conversing with the President concerning the operations impending, General Pemberton and I advocated opposite modes of warfare. On the 25th the President returned to Jackson, and on the 27th information was received from General W. W. Loring, commanding near Grenada, that General Grant's army, which had been advancing, was retiring in consequence of the destruction of the depot of supplies at Holly Springs by the gallant Van Dorn's daring and skillfully executed enterprise, surpassed by none of its character achieved during the war. This depot was to have supplied the Federal army in its march toward Vicksburg. Its destruction frustrated that design. General Van Dorn accomplished it on the 20th of December with a brigad
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
not stopped to contest our crossingfurther at the bridge, which he had burned. The troops were set to work at once to construct a bridge across the South Fork of the Bayou Pierre. At this time the water was high, and the current Major-General William W. Loring, C. S. A. From a photograph. rapid. What might be called a raft-bridge was soon constructed from material obtained from wooden buildings, stables, fences, etc., which sufficed for carrying the whole army over safely. Colonel James with reasonable promptness, or had I known the ground as I did afterward, I cannot see how Pemberton could have escaped with any organized force. As it was he lost over 3000 killed and wounded, and about 3000 captured in battle and in pursuit. Loring's division, which was the right of Pemberton's line, was cut off from the retreating army, and never got back into Vicksburg. Pemberton himself fell back that night to the Big Black River. His troops did not stop before midnight, and many of th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Confederate forces: Lieut.-General John C. Pemberton. (search)
Confederate forces: Lieut.-General John C. Pemberton. First division, The major portion of this division was separated from Pemberton after the battle of Champion's Hill, and joined the forces with General Joseph E. Johnston (Pemberton's superior officer) at Jackson, Mississippi.--editors. Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lloyd Tilghman (k), Col. A. E. Reynolds: 1st Confederate Battalion, Maj. G. H. Forney; 6th Miss., Col. Robert Lowry; 15th Miss., Col. M. Farrell; 20th Miss., Col. D. R. Russell; 23d Miss., Col. J. M. Wells; 26th Miss., Col. A. E. Reynolds, Maj. T. F. Parker; Miss. Battery, Capt. J. J. Cowan; Miss. Battery, Capt. Jacob Culbertson. Brigade loss: Champion's Hill, k, 5; w, 10; m, 42 = 57. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Winfield S. Featherston: 3d Miss., Col. T. A. Mellon; 22d Miss., Lieut.-Col. H. J. Reid; 31st Miss., Col. J. A. Orr; 33d Miss., Col. D. W. Hurst; 1st Miss. Battalion Sharpshooters, Maj. W. A. Rayburn. Brigade loss: Champion's Hill,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
al McPherson's troops were moving from Snake Creek Gap toward Resaca. General Polk, who had just reached that place with Loring's division, was charged with its defense. General Wheeler was directed to move next morning with all the available cave army moved from Dalton and reached Resaca just as the Federal troops approaching from Snake Creek Gap were encountering Loring's division a mile from the station. Their approach was delayed long enough by Loring's opposition to give me time to selLoring's opposition to give me time to select the ground to be occupied by our troops. And while they were taking this ground the Federal army was forming in front of them. The left of Polk's corps occupied the west face of the intrenchment of Resaca. Hardee's corps, also facing to the wem instantly. This event produced deep sorrow in the army, in every battle of which he had been distinguished. Major-General W. W. Loring succeeded to the command of the corps. A division of Georgia militia under Major-General G. W. Smith, transf
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ery, Capt. A. L. Huggins. Engineer troops, Lieut.-Col. S. W. Presstman. Polk's (or Stewart's) Corps, Army of Mississippi, Lieut.-Gen. Leonidas Polk, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring, Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart, Maj.-Gen. B. F. Cheatham, Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart. Escort: Orleans Light Horse, Capt. L. Greenleaf. Loring's division, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. Escort: B, 7th Tenn. Cav., Capt. J. P. Russell. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston, Col. Robert Lowry, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 1st Miss., Maj. M. S. Alcorn; 3d Miss., Col. T. A. Melton, Lieut.-Col. S. M. Dyer; 22d Miss., MajMaj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. Escort: B, 7th Tenn. Cav., Capt. J. P. Russell. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston, Col. Robert Lowry, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 1st Miss., Maj. M. S. Alcorn; 3d Miss., Col. T. A. Melton, Lieut.-Col. S. M. Dyer; 22d Miss., Maj. Martin A. Oatis, Lieut.-Col. H. J. Reid, Capt. J. T. Formby; 31st Miss., Col. M. D. L. Stephens, Lieut.-Col. J. W. Drane, Lieut. William D. Shaw, Capt. T. J. Pulliam, Col. M. D. L. Stephens; 33d Miss., Col. J. L. Drake, Capt. M. Jackson, Maj. A. J. Hall; 40th Miss., Col. W. B. Colbert, Lieut.-Col. George P. Wallace, Capt. C. A.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The struggle for Atlanta. (search)
ut the dreadful battle, hard to describe, was left to Thomas. He commanded two attacks, one opposite the Confederate General Loring's General Loring remained with his division in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana until the Atlanta General Loring remained with his division in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana until the Atlanta campaign was fairly opened by Sherman's advance, when all the infantry in Mississippi was ordered to Johnston. Polk, with Loring's division, reached Resaca May 11th. June 14th, Polk having been killed, Loring succeeded temporarily to the command of Loring's division, reached Resaca May 11th. June 14th, Polk having been killed, Loring succeeded temporarily to the command of the corps.--editors. left, the other in front of Cheatham. Newton's division led my attack, and Davis that of Palmer. Like Pickett's charge at Gettysburg, the movement was preceded by a heavy cannonade. Then our skirmishers sprang forward and opeLoring succeeded temporarily to the command of the corps.--editors. left, the other in front of Cheatham. Newton's division led my attack, and Davis that of Palmer. Like Pickett's charge at Gettysburg, the movement was preceded by a heavy cannonade. Then our skirmishers sprang forward and opened; and quickly the enemy's skirmish-line was drawn back to their main work. Harker, commanding one brigade, led his column rapidly over the open ground. Wagner did the same on Harker's left, and Kimball put his brigade in close support. The enem
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
n of the railroad in the vicinity as possible; also to send a division to Allatoona to capture that place, if, in the judgment of the commanding officer, the achievement was feasible. The main body of the army in the meantime moved forward and bivouacked near Carley's house, within four miles of Lost Mountain. On the 4th General Stewart captured, after a slight resistance, about 170 prisoners at Big Shanty, and at 9:30 A. M. the garrison at Ackworth, numbering 250 men, surrendered to General Loring. The forces under these officers joined the main body near Lost Mountain on the morning of the 5th, having, in addition, destroyed about ten or fifteen miles of the railroad. I had received information that the enemy had in store at Allatoona large supplies which were guarded by two or three regiments. As one of the objects of the campaign was to deprive the enemy of provisions, Major-General French was ordered to move with his division, capture the garrison, if practicable, and gai
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The death of Generals Cleburne and Adams. (search)
s. The wonder is that any of them escaped death or capture. In the Bivouac for November, 1885, John McQuaide, of Vicksburg, Miss., wrote: Some time since I called attention to the inaccuracies of current history in regard to the manner of General Patrick Cleburne's death at Franklin. The subject has been brought to my mind again by Mr. James Barr's letter. It has been stated that Cleburne and horse were killed on top of the works, which is incorrect. It was General John Adams, of Loring's division, Stewart's corps. Early next morning I assisted in putting his body in an ambulance; also the body of General Cleburne. Adams's horse was a bay. It was dead upon the works, with its front legs toward the inner side of the works. Adams's body was lying outside, at the base of the works, when I helped to pick it up. Cleburne's body was not less than fifty or sixty yards from the works, and on nearly a straight line from where Adams fell. This may appear strange, as the two gener
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Nashville, Dec. 15-16, 1864. (search)
; 4th La. Battalion, Capt. T. A. Bisland; 14th La. Battalion Sharp-shooters, Lieut. A. T. Martin. Holtzlaw's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. T. Holtzclaw: 18th Ala., Lieut.-Col. P. F. Hunley; 32d and 58th Ala., Col. Bushrod Jones; 36th Ala., Capt. N. M. Carpenter; 38th Ala., Capt. C. E. Bussey. Artillery Battalion (Eldridge's), Capt. C. E. Fenner: Ala. Battery, Capt. W. J. McKenzie; Miss. Bat'y, Lieut. J. S. McCall. Stewart's Corps (Polk's), Lieut.-Gen. A. P. Stewart. Loring's division, Maj.-Gen. W. W. Loring. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 1st Miss., Capt. O. D. Hughes; 3d Miss., Capt. O. H. Johnston; 22d Miss., Maj. M. A. Oatis; 31st Miss., Capt. R. A. Collins; 33d Miss., Capt. T. L. Cooper; 40th Miss., Col. W. B. Colbert; 1st Miss. Batt'n, Maj. J. M. Stigler. Adams's Brigade, Col. Robert Lowry: 6th Miss., Lieut.-Col. Thomas J. Borden; 14th Miss., Col. W. L. Doss; 15th Miss., Lieut.-Col. J. R. Binford; 20th Miss., Maj. Thomas B. Graham; 23d Miss., Maj. G. W. B.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 11.88 (search)
l, commanding the artillery brigade of the corps, had taken position on the hills in the rear of Fort Stedman, and with Fort Haskell and Battery IX opened on the captured works and the space around, driving the enemy to the bomb-proofs and materially interfering with the deployment of a line of battle. There was still a distance of three hundred yards between the left of the 200th and the right of the 205th, through which ran the road to Meade's Station, uncovered. A short time before, Colonel Loring, of General Parke's staff, had delivered to me, on the way over from the right to the left, orders to put the Second Brigade in position on the hills directly covering Meade's Station. But the positions of the 205th and 207th of this brigade were so favorable, and the spirit of the order had been so effectually carried out, that it was unnecessary to obey it literally, and only the 211th, now at hand after a three-miles march, was ordered to deflect to the right and take post on the hil
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