Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Loring or search for Loring in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's Meridian expedition and Sooy Smith's raid to West point. (search)
servation of this large force in Mississippi two small divisions of Confederate States infantry, Loring at Canton, and French at Morton — about nine thousand men. S. D. Lee, with four brigades of cavas drawn from the vicinity of Natchez; Ferguson was placed between Canton and Big Black, covering Loring, and Ross near the Yazoo river above Mechanicsburg. The Big Black was picketed heavily towards k to Jackson, where it arrived about dark, passing out on the road towards Canton, to enable General Loring's infantry division to cross Pearl river from Canton, moving towards Morton on the Jackson alinton towards Madison station, on the railroad from Jackson to Canton, to more completely cover Loring's march. A regiment was sent to keep in front of the enemy, in case he moved towards Brandon aneen done without his Meridian expedition. Does the General forget that the Confederate infantry (Loring and French), which was in Mississippi at the time of his expedition, was also in Johnston's army
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Hardee and the Military operations around Atlanta. (search)
the enemy, by extending to the right, had nearly gained the Lick Skillet road. Loring's and Walthall's divisions had been relieved at the trenches, and it was expectged and in need of assistance. Accordingly, Walthall's division was moved out (Loring's following in support), and formed on Lee's left. It attacked the enemy, stro a hill, and failing, after a desperate fight and heavy loss, to dislodge them, Loring's division was placed in position along the Lick Skillet road, and Walthall directed to withdraw his in rear of Loring's. A short time previous to this, General Loring was wounded, leaving his division under command of Brigadier-General FeathersGeneral Loring was wounded, leaving his division under command of Brigadier-General Featherston. While his division was taking its position, I was myself disabled. The Federal accounts are to the same effect. And the Federal commander, in his official there and look after matters. While I was with him news came that Stewart and Loring were wounded. I went out at once, but did not assume command. I found that Br