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ave thirty days for all vessels in Southern ports to leave, but made no provision for vessels arriving after its passage.--New Orleans Picayune, May 25. The Senate of Kentucky passed resolutions that that State will not sever her connection with the National Government, nor take up arms for either belligerent party, but arm herself for the protection of peace within her borders, and tender her services as a mediator to effect a just and honorable peace.--Ohio Statesman, May 25. join Lothrop motley published an article on the Causes of the civil War in America, in the London Times of this day.--(Doc. 146 1/2.) Jefferson Davis issued at Montgomery, Ala., a proclamation appointing Thursday the 13th day of June, 1861, to be observed as a day of fasting and prayer by the people of the seceded States.--(Doc 194.) A General movement into Virginia was executed under the command of Gen. Mansfield. The N. Y. Seventh Regiment left their camp in Washington at 1:20 A. M., each m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
t moved his headquarters to Jackson, Tennessee. Pursuant to this order, on the 26th of September I repaired to Corinth, where I found the only defensive works available consisted of the open batteries Robinett, Williams, Phillips, Tannrath, and Lothrop, established by Captain Prime on the College Hill line. I immediately ordered them to be connected by breastworks, and the front to the west and north to be covered by such an abatis as the remaining timber on the ground could furnish. I emplo front lest the enemy should turn his left, and directed General Stanley to hold the reserve of his command ready either to help north of the town or to aid McKean if required. I visited Battery Robinett and directed the chief of artillery, Colonel Lothrop, to see to the reserve artillery, some batteries of which were parked in the public square of the town; then the line of Davies's division, which was in nearly open ground, with a few logs, here and there, for breast-works, and then on his e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Corinth. (search)
t moved his headquarters to Jackson, Tennessee. Pursuant to this order, on the 26th of September I repaired to Corinth, where I found the only defensive works available consisted of the open batteries Robinett, Williams, Phillips, Tannrath, and Lothrop, established by Captain Prime on the College Hill line. I immediately ordered them to be connected by breastworks, and the front to the west and north to be covered by such an abatis as the remaining timber on the ground could furnish. I emplo front lest the enemy should turn his left, and directed General Stanley to hold the reserve of his command ready either to help north of the town or to aid McKean if required. I visited Battery Robinett and directed the chief of artillery, Colonel Lothrop, to see to the reserve artillery, some batteries of which were parked in the public square of the town; then the line of Davies's division, which was in nearly open ground, with a few logs, here and there, for breast-works, and then on his e
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
on of Regulars, Lieutenant Du Bois' light battery of four pieces, and tie First Missouri Volunteers. Deitzler's brigade was composed of the First and Second Kansas and First Iowa Volunteers, and two hundred mounted Missouri Home Guards. Sigel's column consisted of the Third and Fifth Missouri Volunteers, one company of cavalry, under Captain Carr, another of dragoons, under Lieutenant Farrand, of the First Infantry, and a company of re, fruits, with a light battery of six guns, under Lieutenant Lothrop. At the same time, as we have observed, the Confederates were preparing for a similar movement. They were divided into four columns, and ordered to march at nine o'clock on the night of the 9th, August. so as to surround Springfield and attack the National Army at dawn the next morning. On account of a gathering storm and the intense darkness, McCulloch countermanded the order, and his army, wearied with waiting and watching, was still in camp on Wilson's Creek on the morning of
ice. Col. J. W. Bissell, engineer regiment, rendered me most valuable service, both before and during the bombardment of the place. He conducted the erection of the heavy batteries, and remained in them until the enemy evacuated the place. Major Lothrop, Chief of Artillery, has distinguished himself throughout the operations. My personal staff, Major Butler, Assistant Adjutant-General, Major C. A. Morgan, and Capt. L. H. Marshall, Aids-de-Camp, and Major Corse, Inspector-General, were prot and efficient in conveying my orders under fire of the enemy. I transmit, enclosed, the reports of division and brigade commanders immediately concerned in the final operations, as also of Capt. Mower, commanding in the batteries, and of Major Lothrop, Chief of Artillery. Col. J. W. Bissell, Engineers, has been too incessantly occupied to make a written report, but desires to mention the following officers of this regiment who displayed unusual gallantry: Lieut.-Col. Adams, Captains Dea
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
Literary notices. Poems of Paul Hamilton Hayne — complete edition — with numerous illustrations. Boston: D. Lothrop & Co. We have received from the Publishers this superb specimen of the Book-maker's art, of which, (reserving a full review for a future number) we can only say now that it presents the sweet poems of our Southern bard in most attractive form and we really know of no more appropiate gift book for the approaching holidays than this beautiful volume which is sold for $4, $5, $7, or $10 according to binding. Agents are wanted everywhere. The century and St. Nicholas lose none of their attractions as the months and years go on. The former maintains its well earned reputation as a really first class family Magazine, and as for St. Nicholas we would leave it to any intelligent boy or girl in the land, who has had the privilege of reading it to say if there is anything in this country or in Europe at all comparable to it. Our boys pronounce the December (Christmas)
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter III (search)
d. On the following day I was relieved from mustering duty, and at General Lyon's request was ordered to report to him at Boonville, remaining with him as adjutant-general and chief of staff until his death at Wilson's Creek. The foregoing account gives the organization (the strength was about 14,000) of the volunteer force with which the war in Missouri was begun. To this was added Lyon's company of the 2d Infantry, a detachment of regular recruits, about 180 strong, commanded by Lieutenant Lothrop, and Totten's battery of the 2d United States Artillery. Lyon, who, as described, had been elected brigadier-general of the militia, was on May 17 appointed by the President to the same grade in the United States volunteer forces; and when, on May 30, General Harney was relieved from the command of the Department of the West, General Lyon became the commander of that department. General Lyon was a man of ability and scholarly attainments, an earnest patriot, keenly alive to the nat
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Index (search)
9, 240, 295; letter from Grant, Feb. 23, 1884, 240, 241; on the establishment of Fort Sheridan, 454; attitude in the Fitz-John Porter case, 464, 465 London, Eng., S. in, 385, 392, 393 Longstreet, Lieut.-Gen., James, failure of Parke to expel him from Tennessee, 114; advances to Strawberry Plains, 114; retreats toward Morristown, 115; holds Bull's Gap, 115, 116; withdraws from Tennessee and joins Lee in Virginia, 116 Lookout Range, S. proposes to seize the passes through, 161 Lothrop, Lieut., service in Missouri, 35 Louisiana, included in Division of the Gulf, 447 Louisville, Ky., Logan recalled from, 239, 240; S. at, 345 Lovejoy's Station, Ga., Hood's rendezvous at, 159 Lunalilo, King, ascends the throne of Hawaii, 432 Lynnville, Tenn., proposed point of concentration of Thomas's troops, 201 Lyon, Brig.-Gen., Nathaniel, succeeds Harney in command of Department of the West, 33, 35; enrolls and musters Missouri troops, 33-35; elected brigadier-general Misso
her stand at the Fair Grounds, one mile east of here, where the State has an armory extemporized, Captain Voester again sent them his compliments from the old howitzer's mouth, which, with a couple of shots from Captain Totten, and a volley from Lothrop's detachment of rifles, scattered the now thoroughly alarmed enemy in all directions. Their flight through the village commenced soon after 8 o'clock, and continued till after 11 o'clock. Some three hundred crossed the river, many went south, bry on Second street, St. Louis, between Plum and Poplar, and M. N. Coolidge, of Company H, First regiment. Nine of our men were wounded, but few of them severely. One man is also missing, who was known to have been badly shot. Thos. McCord, of Lothrop's regulars, was one of the most seriously hurt. The loss of the enemy will, probably, never be fully ascertained. It did not fall short of fifty, and probably will run nearly as high as a hundred. Among their dead are Dr. William Quarles, Isa
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
gs Taylor; deserted Aug. 20, ‘63. Logan, Jere., priv., (B), Mar. 19, ‘62; 29; wounded Sept. 17, ‘62; disch. disa. Dec. 29, ‘62. Loftus, John P., priv., (K), Aug. 13, ‘61; 22; N. F.R. Long, Henry A., priv., (C), July 26, ‘61; 18; deserted Aug. 20, ‘61. Longwood, John, priv., (—), Dec. 2, ‘62,; 22; N. F.R. Lopez, Frank, priv.,(F), Aug. 3, ‘63; 22; sub. Joshua S. Hallet; transf. to 20 M. V. Jan. 14, ‘64 Lord, Jas. H., mus., (A), July 26, ‘61; 28; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Lothrop, Willard, priv., (B), Aug. 28, ‘62; 44; disch. disa. Dec. 23, ‘62. Loveland, Nath'l. Jr., priv., (—), Feb. 10, ‘62; 22; (lied June 27, ‘62, Yorktown, Va., in Co. D. Lowell, John Q., priv., (H), Aug. 26, 1861; 25; disch. disa. Oct. 8, ‘61. Lowell, Geo. W., priv., (—), Aug. 15, ‘61; 48; N. F.R. Lowey, Joshua, priv., (—), Nov. 20, ‘63; 30; disch. disa. Dec. 15, ‘63. Lucas, John G., priv.,(—),Aug. 10, ‘61; 20; see 24 Mass. Vols. did not serv
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