hide Matching Documents

Your search returned 14 results in 7 document sections:

65. to arms! by Martha Perry Lowe. Traitors and foes! We shall arm! We shall arm! Brethren are ye?--but it matters us not-- Men of the South! We are calm! We are calm! You are like madmen, misguided and hot! Long have we patiently borne with your hate; Shame has been rising and flushing our brow; Oh! we've entreated you, early and late-- God only knows what has come o'er us now! We are not angry — the fire is too deep; We will not taunt — that's for boys, and not men; Yet we have sworn, and our word we will keep, Never shall you trample on us again! You have dishonored the Stripes and the Stars! The pale North a moment did hold in her breath; Now thousands of eyes, like the red planet Mars, Do glare on you steady defiance and death! You love not to work, you are all gentle-men; Arms are your pastime, and “fight” is your word; We love the plow, and the loom, and the pen; Nobler is Peace, to our hearts, than the Sword. You have been plotting all over the land-- You have
and weal, Thy peerless chivalry reveal, And gird thy beauteous limbs with steel, Maryland! My Maryland! Thou wilt not cower in the dust, Maryland! Thy beaming sword shall never rust, Maryland! Remember Carroll's sacred trust, Remember Howard's warlike thrust-- And all thy slumberers with the just, Maryland! My Maryland! Come! 'tis the red dawn of the day, Maryland! Come! with thy panoplied array, Maryland! With Ringgold's spirit for the fray, With Watson's blood at Monterey, With fearless Lowe and dashing May, Maryland! My Maryland! Come! for thy shield is bright and strong, Maryland! Come! for thy dalliance does thee wrong, Maryland! Come! to thine own heroic throng, That stalks with Liberty along, And give a new Key to thy song, Maryland! My Maryland! Dear Mother! burst the tyrant's chain, Maryland! Virginia should not call in vain, Maryland! She meets her sisters on the plain-- “Sic semper,” 'tis the proud refrain, That baffles millions back amain, Maryland! Arise, in maj
Report of Necrology Committee. Somerville, April 6, 1903. The society mourns the loss of four members by death during the past year: Mrs. Martha Perry Lowe, Martin L. Carr, Mrs. Ernest L. Loring, and Christopher E. Rymes. A tribute has already been paid to the memory of Mrs. Lowe and Mr. Carr. Mrs. Loring died February 8, 1903. She had been a member of the society four years. Mr. Rymes died March 11, 1903. He had been prominently identified with the affairs of this city aMrs. Lowe and Mr. Carr. Mrs. Loring died February 8, 1903. She had been a member of the society four years. Mr. Rymes died March 11, 1903. He had been prominently identified with the affairs of this city and with many of its social and benevolent organizations during a long period, serving as a member of both branches of the city government, and for many years as a member of the board of trustees of the Somerville Public Library, and a most valued member and president of the Somerville Water Board. In 1875 he represented this district in the Massachusetts Senate. He was a man of sterling integrity, and conscientious in the discharge of every public duty.
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Literary men and women of Somerville. (search)
ing strings Doth joy's glad anthem swell. It is clear that Mrs. Libby had a feeling for metrical language, and also, in her best work, a measure of that essential impulse which makes poetry what it is. A still more recent loss is that of Mrs. Lowe, who died May 9, 1902. Mrs. Martha Perry Lowe for many years was known as one of the most public-spirited women in this city, active in all good wcrk. Her literary productions include a ‘Memoir’ of her husband, Rev. Charles Lowe, who from 1859Mrs. Martha Perry Lowe for many years was known as one of the most public-spirited women in this city, active in all good wcrk. Her literary productions include a ‘Memoir’ of her husband, Rev. Charles Lowe, who from 1859 to 1865 was pastor of the First Unitarian church here, and afterward Secretary of the American Unitarian Society. It is said that, in the midst of her numerous deeds of practical beneficence, Mrs. Lowe yet cherished the name of poet above all others. She has left four volumes of verse, and one longer poem unpublished. It is safe to say that, of the published books, ‘The Olive and the Pine’ and ‘The Immortals’ contain the poems by which Mrs. Lowe will be remembered. The former inclu
gifts made to us by our people. we would no doubt become soon a celebrated landmark to both old and young, and a power among our celebrated institutions, and we live in hopes that we may yet receive from some patriotic and philanthropic person sufficient funds to realize a structure, or else money which will be a nucleus for a building fund, devoted to history, and where the sons and daughters of Revolutionary heroes may also find a home. What better building could be erected in our midst? Like all organizations, death has entered into our midst, taking away some helpful workers. None will be more missed than our first vice-president, Luther B. Pillsbury, who died in 1905, and who was ever constant and interested in the growth of our Society. Also Mrs. Martha Perry Lowe, President Capen, of Tufts College, Quincy A. Vinal, and a few others. Having now covered the principal part of our doings the past ten years, we are working for still better results in the next decade to come.
sed.Mrs. Catherine Libby Mr. Charles P. Lincoln Charter members. Deceased.Mr. Charles S. Lincoln Resigned.Mrs. Emma A. Lincoln Mr. Williston Lincoln Charter members. Life members.Mr. George E. Littlefield Life members.Mr. Samuel T. Littlefield Mrs. Samuel T. Littlefield $ Charter members.Mr. Ernest S. Loring Resigned.Mrs. Ernest S. Loring Resigned. Charter members.Mr. George F. Loring Charter members.Mrs. Sarah F. Loring Deceased.Mrs. Martha P. Lowe Mrs. Mabel F. Luce Charter members.Mr. Robert Luce Resigned.Miss Eliza F. McKay Deceased.Miss Mary M. McKay Resigned.Mr. G. Roscoe Marsh Resigned.Mr. George L. Marshall Life members.Mr. Seth Mason Prof. David L. Maulsby Mrs. David L. Maulsby Mrs. Caroline L. Maynard Resigned.Mrs. E. A. Maynard Resigned.Mr. Walter C. Mentzer Mr. Fred H. Merrifield Mr. Frank E. Merrill Resigned.Mrs. May J. Miller Mrs. Harriet G. Minot Resigned.Mr.
Leathe, Mary A., 3. Leavitt, Major, 23. Leavitt, Rev. Horace H., 4. Lee, General. 44, 57. 77. Leighton,———. 13. Leland,———. 14. Leland, Caleb W., 55. Leland, Thomas J.,. 55. Lexington. Mass., 77. Libby, Mrs. Mary A., 3. Liberty Pole Square, 5. Licking Run, Va., 43. Lincoln, Charles S., Esq., 5, 41, 42. Line-field, The, 26. Linwood Street, 12. London, Eng., 30, 78. London's Plantation, 79. Long Bridge, 64. Longstreet's Corps, 56. Loudon, N. H., 1, 2. Lowe, Martha Perry, 78. Lowell Railroad, 12. Lovett, Washington, 22. Lyle, Colonel, Peter, 45, 64. Magoun House, 52. Magoun, John C., 8, 55. Main Street, Charlestown, 54. Malden. Mass., 5, 28, 51, 52, 54. Mallet, Andrew, 51. Mallet, Jean, or John. 51. Manassas Railroad, Va., 43. Mann, Eben C., Jr., 15. Marcus Aurelius. 81. Market Bank, 10. Marks, Patrick, 27. Marrett, D. A., 5, 40. Marrett, S. H., 5, 40. Mars, The Temple of, 81. Martindale Barracks, 19. Maryland Heights, 2