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at he was accustomed to run rapidly over Euclid and other mathematical works with which he was familiar, reviving at a glance their trains of reasoning. General Johnston read slowly, and not many books; but he thought much on what he read. His habit was to revolve what he read in every possible relation to practical life. He was familiar with Shakespeare; he enjoyed Dickens, and drew largely upon Gil Blas for illustration. He was fond of physical science, and Mrs. Somerville and Sir Charles Lyell were favorites with him. But, at the time of which I speak, his chief literary delight was a translation of Herodotus. He was the first to impress upon me the veracity of the Old Historian, and to point out the care with which he discriminated between what he saw, what he heard, and what he surmised or inferred. While I was with him, a report came that his friend, Colonel Jason Rogers, commanding at Monterey, was cooped up in the Black Fort, with a small garrison — the Louisville
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
-headed, hard, persevering, unscrupulous, carnivorous, . . . with an incredible genius for lying. Ere this, however, better sense was prevailing. Basil Hall, though preferring the manners of aristocratic England, was not unkindly, nor was Mrs. Trollope (1832) unsympathetic. Dickens himself, having followed the Ohio and the Mississippi to St. Louis, and having visited Looking-Glass Prairie, in 1842 published his American notes, in which he blows 'em up with moderation. The courteous Sir Charles Lyell (1845) was unfortunately justified in a dislike of American boasting. Meanwhile the Americans, sensitive as well as vainglorious or patriotic, on their part had not been idle, whether in the magazines or in books. Niles' weekly Register, and The North American review, with Edward Everett as editor, hurried to the defence, and Timothy Dwight, Irving, Fenimore Cooper, and Paulding were among those who, with or without finesse, parried the foreign thrusts. Robert Walsh wrote An appe
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
162 Locke, 57, 58, 66, 70 n., 81, 93, 116, 1 8, 329, 334 Locke Amsden, 310 Lockhart, 305 Logan, 309 Logan, C. A., 228 Logan, James, 189 Loiterer, the, 234 London chronicle, the, 129, 140 London magazine, the, 121 Long, Major S. H., 205, 210 Longfellow, 166, 212, 244, 261, 262, 273, 355 Looking Glass for the times, a, 151 Love in 1876, 226 Lowell, James Russell, 241, 244, 249, 261, 268, 270, 276, 279, 282, 341, 344 Lucretius, 269 Lycidas, 274 Lyell, Sir, Charles, 186, 207 Lyon, Richard, 156 Lyrical ballads, 183, 262, 262 n. Lytton, Lord, 243 M McDonough, Thomas, 222 McFingal, 139, 171-173, 182 McKinnon, John D., 163 McLane, Louis, 250 MacDonald, W., 125 n., 130 n., 134 n., 141 n. Madison, 146, 148, 149, 170 Madoc, 212 Magnalia, 51 Malebranche, 58 Mallet, David, 215 Man at home, the, 290 Mandeville, Bernard, 91 Mandeville, 292 Manners of the times, the, 175 Manual of American literature, a, 324 n.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
ers of Parliament, Sir Charles and Lady Trevelyan (daughter of Zachary Macaulay), Miss Cobden, Lady Lyell and Miss Lyell, Professor Fawcett and wife, Professor Beesly, Henry Fawcett. Victor SchoelcheMiss Lyell, Professor Fawcett and wife, Professor Beesly, Henry Fawcett. Victor Schoelcher, As Colonial Minister under the French Republic of 1848, Schoelcher precipitated the abolition of slavery in the French colonies. W. Vernon Harcourt, Jacob Bright, E. S. Beesly. Justin McCarthy,the objects of the meeting were also received from the Earl of Shaftesbury, Lord Houghton, Sir Charles Lyell, Sir T. F. Buxton, Goldwin Smith, Charles Buxton, M. P., Professor J. E. Cairnes, Thomas Hughes, M. P., and many others unable to attend. Of these we give but one: Sir Charles Lyell to F. W. Chesson. 73 Harley Street, June 22, 1867. W. L. G. Breakfast, p. 17. dear Sir: I regnow will be glad to contribute to its success. Believe me, dear Sir, Very truly yours, Charles Lyell. Here it will not be inappropriate to cite the following private tribute from Charles Darwi
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
from his bed, threw open his window, and, hailing the terrified watchman, cried out: It's not four o'clock; it wants five minutes of it! and, after this volley, at once fell asleep. At the same dinner last week, I met Hallam, Whewell, Babbage, Lyell, Sir Charles Lyell, 1797-1875. Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey Murchison, 1792-1871. Dr. Buckland, Sedgwick, Rev. Adam Sedgwick, 1785—. and one or two M. P. s. Hallam talked about Prescott's book, and praised it very much. He said that LoSir Charles Lyell, 1797-1875. Murchison, Sir Roderick Impey Murchison, 1792-1871. Dr. Buckland, Sedgwick, Rev. Adam Sedgwick, 1785—. and one or two M. P. s. Hallam talked about Prescott's book, and praised it very much. He said that Lord Holland was in ecstasy about it; and that he was the most competent judge of it in England. Mr. Mountstuart Elphinstone 1779-1859; noted for his official service in India, and his descriptive and historical writings upon that country.—one of the most remarkable men in England—has read it with the greatest care; and he spoke of it to me with the highest praise. I find myself in such a round of society that I hardly know of which dinner or reunion to write you. I have many more invitatio
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
d the British Constitution. Jan. 16, 1839. This London is socially a bewitching place. Last evening I first dined with Booth, a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquentMrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 16, 1839. (search)
Jan. 16, 1839. This London is socially a bewitching place. Last evening I first dined with Booth, a Chancery barrister; then went to Rogers's, where was a small party, —Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Austin, Miss Martineau, Mr. and Mrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passMrs. Lyell, Mr. and Mrs. Wedgewood, Harness, Rev. William Harness. and Milman. We talked and drank tea, and looked at the beautiful pictures, the original editions of Milton and Spenser, and listened to the old man eloquent (I say eloquent indeed); and so the time passed. This morning I spent chatting with Hayward about law, literature, and society; then walked with Whewell, and afterwards dined with Bellenden Ker. H. Bellenden Ker was a conveyancer; was a friend of Lord Brougham, and passed the later years of his life at Cannes, in France, where he died, about 1870. Sumner was his guest at dinner on different occasions, at 27 Park Road, Regent's Park. And the dinner! it is to be spoken of always. There was a small company: our host and his wife,—one o
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
ne person to the Presidency beyond a single term. To these views he always adhered. See remarks in the Senate, Feb. 11, 1867; Works, Vol. XI. p. 98. In December, 1873,—three months before his death,—he moved joint resolutions in the Senate for Constitutional amendments limiting the Presidency to a single term, and extending it to six years; providing for the President's election by a direct vote of the people; and abolishing the office of Vice-President. Early in August, 1841, Sir Charles Lyell arrived by steamer from Liverpool,—the first of his two visits to the United States; and Sumner had pleasant associations with him during his visits to Boston, driving him and his wife to the suburbs, both then and a year later, when they embarked on their return. Lord Morpeth lost his election to Parliament, for the West Riding in Yorkshire, in the summer of 1841; and made a visit to this country in the autumn, arriving by steamer at Boston, Oct. 21. He spent nearly a year in Amer<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
st seeming cold, getting easily interested in whatever is going forward. . . . At half past 8 we adjourned in mass, after a very lively talk, from the tavern, which was the well-known Crown and Anchor, in the Strand, to the Geological Rooms at Somerset House. . . . . Sedgwick read a synopsis of the stratified rocks of Great Britain; an excellent, good-humored extemporaneous discussion followed, managed with much spirit by Greenough, the first President, and founder of the Society; Murchison; Lyell, the well-known author; Stokes; Buckland; and Phillips of York. . . . . May 24.—Dined at Holland House, with Lady Fitzpatrick, Mr. Akerley,—who has done such good service as chairman of the committee on the Poor-Laws,—Lord Shelburne, Sir James Kempt,— who is thankful to be no longer Governor-General of Canada,— Lord John Russell, Allen, and two others. It was a pleasure to dine in that grand old Gilt Room, with its two ancient, deep fireplaces, and to hear Lord Holland's genial talk, for
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
eneral of the United States. January 2, 1842. Many thanks for your kindness to the Lyells. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lyell, afterwards Sir Charles and Lady Lyell. They deserved it. You give us the Mrs. Charles Lyell, afterwards Sir Charles and Lady Lyell. They deserved it. You give us the last news we get of them, and the last, perhaps, we ever shall get, if your account of the storm in which they left Washington is to be taken without mitigation. But I suspect you politicians there aLady Lyell. They deserved it. You give us the last news we get of them, and the last, perhaps, we ever shall get, if your account of the storm in which they left Washington is to be taken without mitigation. But I suspect you politicians there are so in the habit of exaggeration, that fiction, half the time, comes as handy as fact. At the latest dates, I notice, the Treasury was so empty that the draft of the proper officer, to procure fund them which would not give you pleasure. Their visit has thus far certainly been successful. Mr. Lyell has found enough in the geology of the country to reward him for his trouble, and enough intelpping a fortnight in my family—for a still longer tour in the West and in Canada. . . . But to Mrs. Lyell these varieties, as far as they chance to be disagreeable, are not of consequence, so long as
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