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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), South Carolina, (search)
etire......Nov. 12, 1775 Colonel Moultrie, authorized by the council of safety, takes possession of Haddrell's Point, and with artillery drives the British vessels from Charleston Harbor......December, 1775 Constitution framed by the Provincial Congress of South Carolina adopted, March 26, 1776, and courts of justice opened......April 23, 1776 British fleet under Sir Peter Parker unsuccessfully attacks Fort Moultrie, Sullivan's Island.......June 28, 1776 Thomas Heyward, Jr., James Lynch, Jr., Arthur Middleton, and Edward Rutledge sign the Declaration of Independence......1776 Colonel Williamson, with 2,000 men, marches against the Cherokees, Sept. 13, and lays waste all their settlements east of the Apalachian Mountains......September, 1776 Cherokee Indians by treaty cede to South Carolina all their land eastward of the Unaka Mountains......May 20, 1777 Henry Laurens, of South Carolina, chosen president of the Continental Congress......Nov. 1, 1777 Constitutio
trust that the present arrangement is not permanent. With many wishes for your success, believe me very sincerely and respectfully Your obedient servant, Robert G. Shaw, Colonel Commanding Fifty-fourth Regiment Mass. Infantry. Upon the national holiday all unnecessary duty was dispensed with. Everywhere on land and water the stars and stripes were displayed and saluted. At the camp many men were permitted to pass the lines. Several officers visited the camp of the Second South Carolina. Colonel Shaw and others attended a celebration of the day held by the freedmen in the yard of the Baptist Church, some six miles distant, where the Declaration of Independence was read, hymns sung, and addresses made. Rev. Mr. Lynch, a colored clergyman from Baltimore, held religious services for the Fifty-fourth on Sunday, the 5th. News was received of the promotion of Major Hallowell to be lieutenant-colonel in place of his brother, promoted colonel of the Fifty-fifth Massachusetts.
but all united in acknowledging the kindness and assistance of their only friends, the negroes. Besides the departure of the One Hundred and Fifty-seventh New York, on the 21st, the Morris Island garrison was further reduced by the transfer of the One Hundred and Twenty-seventh New York to Beaufort. This necessitated the detail the next day of Lieutenant Leonard and Company K as provost guard, and Company A joined in that duty shortly after. At a meeting of the officers on the 24th the Rev. James Lynch, a colored man, was elected chaplain of the Fifty-fourth. He was subsequently commissioned, but not mustered. Sergeant Cezar, of Company D, was appointed acting sergeant-major, and Wm. J. Netson, principal musician. With a diminished garrison the duties bore heavily on the remaining troops. The Fifty-fourth began furnishing grand-guard details when relieved of the prisoners. It was nearly two miles from the camp to Gregg. Reliefs going beyond Wagner were exposed to the enemy's
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Roster of the Fifty-Fourth Massachusetts Infantry. (search)
otion. Wounded 30 Nov 64 Honey Hill, S. C. Other service:— Co. F. 2nd Mass. 25 May 61; re-enld 30 Dec 63, Sergt., Capt 103d U. S. C. T. 9 May 65. Discharged 16 Apl 66 ex. term., Oakland, Cal. Webster, Frederick hedge; 2nd Lieut. 2 Aug 43 Boston; single; clerk; Boston. 2d Lt 4 May 64, must. 16 Jly. Died of disease 25 Jan 65 Gen. Hos. Beaufort, S. C. The following officers were commissioned in the regiment, but were not mustered:— Bowditch, Henry P. as Major 27 Jly 63 declined. Lynch, James, as Chaplain 27 Oct 64, commission cancelled. Greeley, Adolphus W. as 2nd Lieut. 28 Feb 63, commission cancelled. Smith, Charles F. as 2nd Lieut. 9 Jly 63, commission cancelled. Hall, F. A. as 2nd Lieut 1 Aug 63 commission cancelled. Adams, Z. Boylston, as 2nd Lieut. 15 Aug 63 declined. Hocking, Alfred as 2nd Lieut 4 May 64 declined. Patten, Thomas H. as 2nd Lieut. 22 Feb 65, commission cancelled. Haskins, William G. as 2nd Lieut. 1 Apl 65 commission cancelled.
Little, James L., 15. Little, John L., 207. Littlefield, Henry W., 34, 51, 133, 135, 164, 166, 196, 234, 276. Littlefield, M. S., 107, 117, 176. Lockwood, John B., 227. Long Island, S. C., 200. Loqueer, J. W., 12. Loring, C. G., 15. Loring, Mrs. William J., 16. Louisiana Troops. Infantry: Native Guards (Colored), 1. Loveridge, R. C., 168. Lowell, Charles R., Jr., 19. Lowell, John, 15. Lownde's plantation, 275. Loyalist, steamer, 309. Luck, John T., 99, 100, 101. Lynch, James, 50, 232. M. Mackay's Point, S. C., 258, 263. Mackey, Albert G., 283, 312. Magnolia Cemetery, 284, 310. Magrath, A. G., 264. Mahaska, gunboat, 177. Maine Troops. Infantry: Ninth, 74. Eleventh, 110, 187. Manchester, S. C., 295, 296, 297, 298, 307. Manchester and Wilmington Railroad, 295. Managault, Edward, 201. Mann, O. L., 123. Mann, Samuel Willard, 34, 54, 55, 56, 59, 61, 79, 81, 90, 133. Manning, S. C., 293. Manning, John L., 307. Manning plantation, 307. Manni
chael Hogan. Philip Hunt. William Hamilton. Charles Harris. Fred W. Hubner. Andrew P. Green. Michael Gahagin. Co. D.Frank Heill. Charles Ferguson. William Smith. Co. E.William Johnson, Corporal. Julius Rieser. James M. Harrison. Henry Hagedon. Michael Holligan. Alfred Horstman. Peter Kennedy. William B. Kelley. Rodney King. Michael Kenney. George Jones. Robert Slocum. Henry Urban. Co. F.Charles Lynch, Corporal. George Doherty. Jeremiah Lucius. John Larouche. James Lynch. Frank Lopez. William Marshall. John McDonald. Charles Matthews. John M. Duncan. John Mack. Philip Morton. Nelson E. Knights, Sergeant (re-enlisted Jan. 3.) Co. G.Daniel Daley (Jan. 27th, to Co. I.) James N. Barrett. Lewis McCrillis. John Wheeling. Thomas Waters. John Young. Joseph A. White. Co. G.William White. George Wood. Lewis Waldick. Co. H.Florence McCarty. Charles Mortimer. Dominick McTague. Henry Mattieson. John McCaul. Charles A. Mohr. John Nieur. Pe
..................................... 292 Lucy, George,........................................................ 105 Ludlow, James,..................................................... 341 Lummus, Benjamin,............................................... 203, 329 Lurvey, James T.,................................................. 4, 8, 50 Lyford, John,........................................................ 331 Lynch, Charles,....................................................... 292 Lynch, James,........................................................ 292 Lynchburg, Va.,.................................... 337 Lyons, Martin,...................................................... 143 Mace, George,..................................................... 95, 105 Mack, John,......................................................... 292 Mack, Thomas,....................................................... 290 Mackin, Francis,...................................................... 331
Petersburg affairs. --A large Union procession, with music, transparencies, &c., took place in Petersburg on Tuesday night.--At the polis, Tuesday morning, Jas. Thayer, in a quarrel with Wm. Rand, stabbed him in the shoulder. James Lynch, of Chesterfield, while driving into the city Thursday, was run into by a hand-car on the South-Side Railroad, his carriage overturned, and himself badly hurt.
Margaret Baker, a free colored woman, from Chesterfield, was ordered ten lashes for remaining in the city contrary to law.--John L. Ward, a soldier, arrested for assaulting a comrade in the Virginia Hospital, was dismissed with an admonition.--James Lynch, charged with assaulting Julia Cronin last Saturday night, appeared before the Mayor yesterday, and, after an unsuccessful effort to prove a practical application of Lynch law, was set at liberty. There was some testimony about scandalous lanch, charged with assaulting Julia Cronin last Saturday night, appeared before the Mayor yesterday, and, after an unsuccessful effort to prove a practical application of Lynch law, was set at liberty. There was some testimony about scandalous language, a hatchet, a brass candlestick, and some stolen "today," which the reporter did not definitely comprehend. Mrs. Cronin was afterwards required to give security for her future good behavior, she having threatened to take the life of Mary Lynch.
owed by the death of the murderer. The circumstances, as we learned them, were as follows: A man named Talbott, who resided near Lynchburg, dined that day with James Lynch. After dinner, the two were seen at Lynch's corner, talking and drinking together apparently in the most friendly manner. Soon after Lynch was found dead by hLynch's corner, talking and drinking together apparently in the most friendly manner. Soon after Lynch was found dead by his counter, literally cut to pieces. Talbott's hat, spectacles, pocketbook with money in it, and a portion of his cravat were found on the counter near the dead man; and Talbott himself was soon after discovered near by, his clothes torn and ragged, as if in a severe struggle, and covered with blood. He was at once arrested and aLynch was found dead by his counter, literally cut to pieces. Talbott's hat, spectacles, pocketbook with money in it, and a portion of his cravat were found on the counter near the dead man; and Talbott himself was soon after discovered near by, his clothes torn and ragged, as if in a severe struggle, and covered with blood. He was at once arrested and a guard placed over him. At the first relaxation of vigilance on the part of the guard, after dark, he broke from them and ran — The guard pursued, and repeatedly ordered him to stop, threatening to shoot if he did not. He continued to run, and at length the guard fired killing him instantly. Such are the circumstances as we l
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