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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 4 4 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (search)
George F. McGinnis; 8th Mo., Major John McDonald. Brigade-loss: k, 11; w, 69 = 80. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Lew Wallace. First Brigade, Col. Charles Cruft: 31st Ind., Lieut.-Col. John Osborn, Major Fred. Arm; 44th Ind., Col. Hugh B. Reed; 17th Ky., Col. John H. McHenry, Jr.; 25th Ky., Col. James M. Shackelford. Brigade loss: k, 35; w, 182 ;: m, 16 = 233. Second Brigade [attached to the Third Brigade]: 46th Ill., Col. John A. Davis; 57th Ill., Col. Silas D. Baldwin; 58th Ill., Col. William F. Lynch; 20th Ohio, Col. Charles Whittlesey. Brigade loss: k, 6; w, 15; m, 1 = 22. Third Brigade, Col. John M. Thayer: 1st Neb., Lieut.-Col. Wm. D. McCord; 58th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. F. F. Rempel; 68th Ohio, Col. S. H. Steedman; 76th Ohio, Col. Wm. B. Woods. Brigade loss: k,3; w,24; m, 1 = 28. Unattached: Battery A, 1st Ill. Lt. Artillery, Lieut. P. P. Wood; A, 32d Ill. Infantry, Capt. Henry Davidson. Loss: w, 10. iron-Clads and gun-boats, Flag-Officer Andrew H. Foote (w). St. Louis (flag
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Shiloh. (search)
etlain, Capt. James R. Hugunin; 81st Ohio, Col. Thomas Morton; 13th Mo., Col. Crafts J. Wright; 14th Mo. (Birge's Sharp-shooters), Col. B. S. Compton. Brigade loss: k, 99; w, 470; m, 11 = 580. Third Brigade, Col. Thomas W. Sweeny (w), Col. Silas D. Baldwin: 8th Iowa, Col. James L. Geddes (w and c); 7th 111., Maj. Richard Rowett; 50th Ill., Col. Moses M. Bane (w); 52d Ill., Maj. Henry Stark, Capt. Edwin A. Bowen; 57th Ill., Col. Silas D. Baldwin, Lieut.-Col. F. J. Hurlbut; 58th Ill., Col. William F. Lynch (c). Brigade loss: k, 127; w, 501; m, 619-= 1247. (A number of the captured or missing were also wounded.) Cavalry: C, 2d, and I, 4th U. S., Lieut. James Powell; A and B, 2d Ill., Captains John R. Hotaling and Thomas J. Larrison. Cavalry loss: k, 1; w, 5=6. Artillery: A, 1st Ill., Lieut. Peter P. Wood; D, 1st Mo., Capt. Henry Richardson; H, 1st Mo., Capt. Frederick Welker; K, 1st Mo., Capt. George H. Stone. Artillery loss: k, 4; w, 53 = 57. Third division, Major-General Lew Wallac
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.53 (search)
ce of the enemy's gun-boats was discovered. The Fanny tried to escape, but got aground and was captured, not, however, until after a spirited resistance by the men and officers with the two small guns which were mounted on her deck. Flag-Officer W. F. Lynch, C. S. N., in his report says: Colonel Wright, of the 8th Georgia regiment, who commands the military forces of the island, had agreed with me to make an attempt to destroy Hatteras Light-house, and we only waited the return of an emissaof affairs I have just stated, and he acquiesced. Arm in arm, we followed the retreating men. [For losses, see p. 679.] The two squadrons at Elizabeth City. The Confederate fleet, known as the mosquito filet, was under command of Commodore William F. Lynch, who, after firing one of his own steamers, the Curlew, and blowing up Fort Forrest, a work situated opposite Roanoke Island on the mainland, retreated up the Pasquotank River, and concentrated his vessels behind a four-gun battery at a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Early operations on the Potomac River. (search)
Its organization was closely connected with the service of the Washington Navy Yard, and other vessels attached to the yard occasionally cooperated with it. Its movements were under the direct supervision of the department. In the early part of May, 1861, the Navy of the State of Virginia began the erection of batteries on the Potomac, in order to close the navigation of the river to Federal vessels proceeding to and from Washington. Works were thrown up under the direction of Captain William F. Lynch, Commander Frederick Chatard, and other officers at Aquia Creek, the terminus of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad, at Mathias Point, and later at Quantico. A small steamer, the George Page, cooperated with the forces on shore. The batteries were manned chiefly by infantry acting as artillerists. The first duty of the Potomac flotilla was to clear the Virginia banks of these obstructions to navigation and open the river. With this object in view, the Freeborn, under Comma
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Red River campaign. (search)
nteenth Army Corps (detachment from the Army of the Tennessee), Brig.-Gen. Andrew J. Smith. Sixteenth Army Corps. first and Third divisions, Brig.-Gen. Jos. A. Mower. first division. Second Brigade, Col. Lucius F. Hubbard: 47th Ill., Col. John D. McClure; 5th Minn., Maj. John C. Becht; 8th Wis., Lieut.-Col. John W. Jefferson. Third Brigade, Col. Sylvester G. Hill: 35th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William B. Keeler; 33d Mo., Lieut.-Col. William H. Heath. Third division. First Brigade, Col. William F. Lynch: 58th Ill., Maj. Thomas Newlan; 119th Ill., Col. Thomas J. Kinney; 89th Ind., Col. Charles D. Murray. Second Brigade, Col. William T. Shaw: 14th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Joseph H. Newbold; 27th Iowa, Col. James I. Gilbert; 32d Iowa, Col. John Scott; 24th Mo. (non-veterans of 21st Mo. attached), Maj. Robert W. Fyan. Third Brigade, Col. Risdon M. Moore: 49th Ill., Maj. Thomas W. Morgan; 117th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Jonathan Merriam; 178th N. Y., Col. Edward Wehler. Artillery: 3d Ind., Capt. James
l be corrected. Commander Hunter, Lieut. Commanders Cooke, Parker, and Alexander, and Masters Commanding McCorrick, Taylor, and Hoole, bravely sustained the credit of the service, and every officer and man performed his duty with alacrity. Lieut. Commanding Simms, although absent on detailed service, exhibited such an eagerness to participate in the conflict as to give full assurance that, if gratified, he would have upheld his high reputation. I am, very respectfully, your obedient, W. F. Lynch, Flag-Officer. New-York Commercial narrative on board U. S. Steamer Cossack Hatteras Inlet, February 4. Monday has passed and no movement has yet taken place, but our preparations have evidently been made more complete. Yesterday and to-day the vessels to be towed in by steamers were hauled into positions astern of their respective steamers. On Monday morning, about eight o'clock, a small sail-boat was seen on the horizon toward the mainland, after which one of the gunboats
ound to be on fire. About the same time the rebel flag on the battery at Cobb's Point was taken down and waved apparently as a signal for the rebel gunboats. Wm. F. Lynch, Flag-Officer, was commanding at the fort. This signal was afterwards ascertained to be an order for the evacuation of the rebel gunboats. They immediately rspatch the victory was ours. The Commodore Perry was in the advance, and made for the rebel steamer Sea Bird, the flag-ship of the rebel navy, on which was Commodore Lynch, and run her down, cutting her through. The Ceres ran straight into the rebel steamer Ellis, and ran her down in like manner, boarding her at the same time. . W. Cooke; Raleigh, Capt. Alexander; Fanny, Capt. Taylor; Beaufort, Capt. Parker; Accomac, Capt. Sands; Forrest, Capt. Hoover; Sea Bird, (the rebel flag-ship,) Com. Lynch. All of these commanders were educated in the United States Naval Academy. Capt. Cooke is taken prisoner by our forces. As I have already said, the Raleigh an
e regiments, the Forty-sixth Illinois, Col. Davis; Fifty-seventh Illinois, Col. Baldwin; and the Fifty-eighth Illinois, Col. Lynch, believed to be a portion of the last-mentioned brigade, came up on Saturday during the action, and were attached to Co action, the Forty-sixth Illinois, Col. Davis; the Fifty-seventh Illinois, Col. Baldwin; and the Fifty-eighth Illinois, Col. Lynch. At three o'clock, on the afternoon of Friday, the fourteenth, I moved the brigade forward, under orders from Gen. W arriving at a small opening in the timber, I filed in to the right, crossing the ravine and ascending the hill, placed Col. Lynch's Fifty-eighth regiment on the right slope of the hill. The Chicago battery, Lieut. Wood, taking position, by directiordered forward for that purpose, if the emergency should arise, which, however, was not necessary. In the afternoon, Col. Lynch was sent forward with his regiment, to the assistance of our forces who were engaged on the right, where Gen. Wallace,
found their book of naval signals, uniform-books, many despatches, log-books, together with their naval-register, containing a list of all their officers who deserted the flag of the Union to take service in the insurgent navy. All these papers and documents were transmitted by Com. Goldsborough to the Navy Department. The following list of the navy is among them: Captains. Law. Rousseau,Geo. N. Hollins, French Forrest,D. N. Ingraham, Josiah Tatnall,Samuel Barron, V. M. Randolph,Wm. F. Lynch, Frank Buchanan,Isaac S. Sterett. commanders. Sidney S. Lee,John K. Mitchell, Wm. C. Whittle,Mat. F. Maury, Robt. D. Thorburn,Raphael Semmes, Robt. G. Robb,John R. Tucker, Wm. W. Hunter,Thomas J. Page, Henry K. Hoff,George Minor, Ebenezer Farrand,Robt. F. Pinkney, H. K. Thatcher,Thos. R. Rootes, John S. Missroon,H. J. Hartstene, Richard L. Page,J. L. Henderson, Frederick Chatard,Wm. T. Muse, Arthur Sinclair,Thos. T. Hunter, C. H. A. H. Kennedy,Chas. F. McIntosh. Thomas W.
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), First expeditions of the Federal Navy (search)
was particularly important that the river should be surveyed. Phelps ran boldly up under the guns of the Confederate batteries and worked for two hours, with the Confederate gunners, lock-strings in hand, plainly visible. Years afterward Colonel Wm. F. Lynch, C. S. A., who commanded the battery, explained that he had not given the order to fire because the Philadelphia seemed to him to be the property of some poor devil who had lost his way and from her appearance was not worth the powder. Th and until joined by the Pawnee, a sloop of less than 1,300 tons, was almost powerless against such heavy ordnance as had been mounted by the Confederates. Yet when the Freeborn and the Anacostia and the Resolute boldly advanced to attack Captain W. F. Lynch's batteries at Aquia Creek on May 29, 1861, the guns of the navy spoke out the brave determination which ever characterized that arm of the service throughout the four years of war. James Harman Ward many European countries believed
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