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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 7 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
infield Scott (General-in-chief) Brig.-General John E. Wool Brig.-General David E. Twiggs Brig.-General William S. Harney. (Note.-E. V. Sumner was promoted Brigadier-General March 16, 1861, vice David E. Twiggs, dismissed March 1, 1861.) * Afterward in the Confederate service. The United States Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles. Assistant Secretary: Gustavus V. Fox. Yards and Docks: Rear-Admiral Joseph Smith. Ordnance and Hydrography Captain George A. Magruder (dismissed April 22, 1861) Captain Andrew A. Harwood (relieved July 22, 1862) Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren (relieved June 24, 1863) Commander Henry A. Wise. (By act of Congress of July 5, 1862, Hydrography was transferred to the Bureau of Navigation.) Navigation (established by act of July 5, 1862) Rear-Admiral Charles A. Davis. Equipment and recruiting (established by act of July 5, 1862) Rear-Admiral Andrew H. Foote (relieved June 3, 1863) Command
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
the mouth of Aquia Creek, there was a Confederate brigade of 3000 men and 6 guns under General Holmes. The approach to Richmond from the Lower Chesapeake, threatened by General B. F. Butler, was guarded by Confederates under Generals Huger and Magruder. On Beauregard's left, sixty miles distant, in the Lower Shenandoah Valley and separated from him by the Blue Ridge Mountains, was the Confederate army of the Shenandoah under command of General Johnston. Beauregard's authority did not extend over the forces of Johnston, Huger, Magruder, or Holmes, but Holmes was with him before the battle of Bull Run, and so was Johnston, who, 4 as will appear more fully hereafter, joined at a decisive moment. Early in June Patterson was pushing his column against Harper's Ferry, and on the 3d of that month McDowell was called upon by General Scott to submit an estimate of the number and composition of a column to be pushed toward Manassas Junction and perhaps the Gap, say in 4 or 5 days, to fav
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first fight of iron-clads. (search)
r.; Volunteer Aides, Lieutenant Douglas Forrest, C. S. A., Captain Kevil, commanding detachment of Norfolk United Artillery; Signal Corps, Sergeant Tabb. Every one had flocked to the army, and to it we had to look for a crew. Some few seamen were found in Norfolk, who had escaped from the gun-boat flotilla in the waters of North Carolina, on their occupation by Admiral Goldsborough and General Burnside. In hopes of securing some men from the army, I was sent to the headquarters of General Magruder at Yorktown, who was known to have under his command two battalions from New Orleans, among whom might be found a number of seamen. The general, though pressed for want of men, holding a long line with scarcely a brigade, gave me every facility to secure volunteers. With one of his staff I visited every camp, and the commanding officers were ordered to parade their men, and I explained to them what I wanted. About 200 volunteered, and of this number I selected 80 who had had some exp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Summer campaign of 1863-report of General W. E. Jones. (search)
ss. A failure to rally promptly and renew the fight is a blemish in the bright history of this regiment. Many officers and men formed noble exceptions. In their efforts to renew the fight fell the noble brothers Captain and Lieutenant Shoup, the former desperately wounded, and the latter instantly killed. Lieutenant Simpson, of this regiment, on provost guard duty, was in the thickest of the fight from first to last, capturing many more prisoners than he had men. Captains Kuykendall and Magruder also added to their brilliant and well earned reputations. Fortunately the Seventh had a chance in a day or so and cleared its reputation. The Sixth Virginia cavalry (Major C. E. Flournoy, commanding), was next ordered to charge, and did its work nobly. Adjutant Allan and others fell at its head, but nothing daunted it passed the skirmishers, assailing and completely routing one of the best United States regiments, just flushed with victory. The fruits were many killed and wounded, amon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
by J. Wm. Jones. Paper no. 3.--down the Valley after Stonewall's quarter-master. I pass by the scenes of our winter quarters at Manassas, and of the falling back from that line of defence; for although there are many points of interest connected with these events, I can only in these papers touch on a few of the more important movements of our army. Ewell's division held the line of the Rappahannock, while Johnston fell back to Richmond, and went thence to the Peninsula to support Magruder in the skillful and gallant resistance he had been making to the advance of the overwhelming force of the enemy. The situation at this time was anything but encouraging. The Confederates after the battle of Manassas, had been beguiled into the idea that the war was virtually over — that foreign powers would certainly recognize the the Confederacy, and that it was scarcely necessary to make much preparation for another campaign. I remember meeting, the day after the brilliant affair, ne
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The attempt to Fasten the assassination of President Lincoln on President Davis and other innocent parties. (search)
to be equally false and mendacious. Conover mentions, in his secret examination, the names of other gentlemen as his intimate associates in Montreal, viz: Captain Magruder and Dr. Fallen, both of whom made affidavits. Says Captain Magruder: I, George A. Magruder, late Captain in the Navy of the United States, and Chief of the Captain Magruder: I, George A. Magruder, late Captain in the Navy of the United States, and Chief of the Bureau of Ordinances and Hydrography, now residing in the city of Montreal, having been duly sworn upon the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, doth depose and say: That having read the evidence or testimony of one Sanford Conover, alias James Watson Wallace, as reported in the public papers to have been given by him, and taken befoGeorge A. Magruder, late Captain in the Navy of the United States, and Chief of the Bureau of Ordinances and Hydrography, now residing in the city of Montreal, having been duly sworn upon the Holy Evangelists of Almighty God, doth depose and say: That having read the evidence or testimony of one Sanford Conover, alias James Watson Wallace, as reported in the public papers to have been given by him, and taken before the Military Commission, now sitting at Washington, D. C., in which he declares that, with others named by said Conover, alias Wallace, he wasi ntimately acquainted with me. This I swear to be absolutely false and untrue. Further, I declare never to have seen this person to my knowledge, nor have I ever heard his name, or assu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
re of Richmond by attacking the lines held by Magruder in the hope of carrying them before Lee couldriters have concurred in this view. Even General Magruder seems to have had serious apprehensions o no such apprehensions, as he remarked on General Magruder's report: General Magruder is underGeneral Magruder is under a misapprehension as to the separation of the troops operating on the north side of the Chickahominneral and simultaneous attack to be opened by Magruder and D. H. Hill. But Magruder was misdirectedMagruder was misdirected by his guide and was late getting into position. Hill mistook the signal, and, attacking alone, dihed gallantry only to meet a bloody repulse. Magruder attacked later and with the same result. Somich General Lee got off at the expense of General Magruder--as gallant a gentleman as ever drew sabrs won for him the soubriquet of Prince John. Magruder had been unfortunate the day before; his guidmpt. What is that? What is that? exclaimed Magruder, who hoped to remove the objection, and saw g
onsummating this design he was badly wounded by a fragment of a shell striking him in the left eye, which unfortunately has lost its sight. Capt. E. P. Turner, assistant adjutant-general, likewise behaved with conspicuous gallantry. Lieutenants Geo. A. Magruder and H. M. Stanard, my aides-de-camp, executed my orders with remarkable gallantry, promptness and intelligence. These two officers have thus been distinguished in the battles of Bethel, Yorktown, Savage Station and Malvern Hill It is only just that I should commend them to the special consideration of the government. Lieutenant Magruder volunteered for the service, and brought off in the most gallant manner some pieces which the men had been compelled to retire from. Lieutenant Stanard behaved with equal gallantry in the execution of orders, exposing himself to the enemy's fire. Lieutenant-Colonel McNeill, of Sibley's brigade, adjutant. and inspector-general, rendered distinguished service in carrying out my orders, as