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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Lee's report of the surrender at Appomattox. (search)
trains west of the railroad, which impeded our advance and embarrassed our movements. On the morning of the 6th General Longstreet's corps reached Rice's Station on the Lynchburg railroad. It was followed by the commands of Generals R. H. Anderson, Ewell, and Gordon, with orders to close upon it as fast as the progress of the trains would permit or as they could be directed on roads father west. General Anderson, commanding Pickett's and B. R. Johnson's divisions, became disconnected with Mahone's division, forming the rear of Longstreet. The enemy's cavalry penetrated the line of march through the interval thus left, and attacked the wagon-train moving toward Farmville. This caused serious delay in the march of the center and rear of the column, and enabled the enemy to mass upon their flank. After successive attacks Anderson's and Ewell's corps were captured or driven from their position. The latter general, with both of his division commanders, Kershaw and Custis Lee, and his
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
gade, Col. Joseph H. Hyman: 13th N. C., Lieut.-Col. E. B. Withers; 16th N. C., Col. William A. Stowe; 22d N. C., Col. Thomas S. Galla-way; 34th N. C., Lieut.-Col. George M. Norment; 38th N. C., Col. John Ashford, Lieut.-Col. George W. Flowers. Mahone's division, Maj.-Gen. William Mahone. Forney's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H. Forney: 8th Ala., Lieut.-Col. John P. Emrich; 9th Ala., Maj. James M. Crow; 10th Ala., Maj. Louis W. Johnson; 11th Ala., Capt. Martin L. Stewart; 13th Ala., Capt. SaMaj.-Gen. William Mahone. Forney's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H. Forney: 8th Ala., Lieut.-Col. John P. Emrich; 9th Ala., Maj. James M. Crow; 10th Ala., Maj. Louis W. Johnson; 11th Ala., Capt. Martin L. Stewart; 13th Ala., Capt. Samuel Sellers; 14th Ala., Capt. John A. Terrell. Weisiger's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. David A. Weisiger: 6th Va., Col. George T. Rogers; 12th Va., Maj. Richard W. Jones; 16th Va., Lieut.-Col. Richard O. Whitehead; 41st Va., Lieut.-Col. Joseph P. Minitree; 61st Va., Col. Virginius D. Groner. Harris's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. N. H. Harris: 12th Miss., Capt. A. K. Jones; 16th Miss., Capt. James H. Duncan; 19th Miss., Col. Richard W. Phipps; 48th Miss., Col. Joseph M. Jayne. Sorrel's Brigade, Col. George E. Tay
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
g. His great charge of nine brigades, on the 18th of June, was repulsed; and on the 22d the Corps had that direful affair in which the whole Corps was flanked, by nobody at all, so to speak. The more I think on that thing, the more ex-traordinary and disgraceful does it appear. At the same time, it is in the highest degree instructive as showing what a bold and well-informed enemy may do in thick woods, where nobody can see more than a company front. The Rebel official accounts show that Mahone, with some 6000 or 7000 men, marched in the face of two corps in line of battle, took 1600 prisoners, ten flags, and four guns, paralyzed both corps, held his position till nightfall, and retreated with a loss of not over 400 men! I was with the 6th Corps and never heard a musket from the 2d nor dreamed it was doing anything, till an aide came to say the line had been driven in. . . . July 12, 1864 I sent off a detail of fifty men at daylight to prepare the ground for the new camp, and
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
cal observations, 44; thirty-first year , 226; visits the North, 228, 303; important, 335; meets Lee, 361; Meade's letter, 362. Lyon, Nathaniel, 9. McClellan, Arthur, 70, 112. McClellan, George Brinton, 141, 262. McGregor, —, 234. McKibbin, Chambers, 220. McLaughlen Napoleon Bonaparte, 261, 323. McMahon, John E., 154. McMahon, Martin Thomas, 107, 247. McParlin, Thomas Andrew, 115, 221. Macy, George Nelson, 97, 215. Madison's ordinary, 119. Mahon, Lord, see Stanhope. Mahone, William, 188. Mangohick Church, 130. Maps, difficulties of, 136. Marivault, —, de, 290. Marseilles, anecdotes of, 191. Marshall, Charles, 361. Marshall, Elisha Gaylord, 199. Martyn, steamer, 319. Marylanders, 221. Mason, Addison Gordon, 69, 122, 249. Mat, the, 121. Matile, George Auguste, 212. Matinee musicale, 317. Meade, George, 36, 48, 75, 359. Meade, George Gordon, 97, 107, 122, 338; at Key West, III; accepts Lyman as volunteer aide, 3; manner of riding, 8; at Ge
ee, Army of Potomac. 53. Those having a * affixed are dead, or have resigned since the commencement of the war. Philip St. George Cocke, Virginia, died in Virginia. 54. R. F. Rhodes, Alabama, Army of Potomac. 55. Richard Taylor, Louisiana, army of Potomac. 56. Louis T. Wigfall, Texas, Army of Potomac. 57. James H. Trapier, South Carolina, Coast of Florida. 58. Samuel G. French, Mississippi, Army of Potomac. 59. William H. Carroll, Tennessee, East Tennessee. 60. Hugh W. Mercer, Georgia,----. 61. Humphrey Marshall, Kentucky, Kentucky. 62. John C. Breckinridge, Kentucky, Kentucky. 63. Richard Griffin, Mississippi, Army of Potomac. 64. Alexander P. Stewart, Kentucky, Kentucky. 65. William Montgomery Gardner, Georgia, on furlough. 66. Richard B. Garnett, Virginia, Army of Potomac. 67. William Mahone, Virginia, Norfolk. 68. L. O'Brien Branch, North Carolina, Coast of North Carolina. 69. Maxey Gregg, South Carolina, Coast of South Carolina.
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
int Intriguers among the Confederates after Gettysburg Lee offers to resign in Mahone's favor Butler's farewell to his troops Ireturned to my command on the 16thstreet and Lee were quite continually at variance, and at the close of the war, Mahone was almost the only volunteer general left in high position. His celebrated bry who gave the parole, the balance having either deserted or been abandoned. Mahone was a railroad engineer, and held only the rank of brigadier-general, having remake that authority known at any time. It has come out, however, that Gen. William Mahone was the man recommended by Lee, and the statement is from Lee's own mouth. Since Mahone's change of politics in Virginia it has been most stoutly contradicted. It is but just to Mahone to say that at the time, he was ignorant both of LeMahone to say that at the time, he was ignorant both of Lee's resignation and of his recommendation. I present here a fac-simile letter of a gentleman of the highest standing in Virginia which tells the story in such word
trade carried on, 843. Hampton, Wade, in Lacy's letter, 881; Lee's conversation in regard to Mahone, 884, 886. Hampton Roads, fleet in, 774-775; reference 786; Lincoln meets Confederate commission on notice of, 100. Homans, Charles E., locomotive, 202. Hotel Chamberlain, Washington, Mahone's letter to Lacy written at, 881. Hood, General, reference to, 655; and Batte's battalions ofKu-Klux, outrages of, 961; the bill passed in regard to, 962. L Lacy, I. Horace, letter to Mahone from, 881, 887. Lafayette, upon military commission, 843. Lamb, Colonel, report of, 804; uLongstreet, 879; depletion in army of, 879; acknowledges mistakes at Gettysburg, 879; tribute to Mahone at state dinner, 881-887; Davenport's report of army, 900; crippled by want of reinforcements, 9282. Mahan, John, services as spy, 484-485. Mahan, Professor, reference to, 817. Mahone, Gen., William, position at close of the war, 879; merit for leadership recognized by Lee, 879-880; an
, through which he had entered Pleasant Valley, with the brigades of Semmes and Mahone. Owing to the rugged nature of the ground on which Kershaw had to operate, a been defended by the brigade of General Cobb, supported by those of Semmes and Mahone, but unable to oppose successfully the superior numbers brought against them, th North-Carolina,Laws's,Hood's,67177 Washington artillery,  1910 6th Virginia,Mahone's,Anderson's,124961 12th Virginia,Mahone's,Anderson's,96069 16th Virginia,MahMahone's,Anderson's,96069 16th Virginia,Mahone's,Anderson's,84755 41st Virginia,Mahone's,Anderson's,83442 48th Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,105161 22d Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,135063 3d Georgia,Wright's,Mahone's,Anderson's,84755 41st Virginia,Mahone's,Anderson's,83442 48th Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,105161 22d Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,135063 3d Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,22931 44th Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,52227 2d Florida, Anderson's, 66 8th Florida, Anderson's,5914 30th Virginia, Anderson's,3811 14th Alabama, AndeMahone's,Anderson's,83442 48th Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,105161 22d Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,135063 3d Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,22931 44th Georgia,Wright's,Anderson's,52227 2d Florida, Anderson's, 66 8th Florida, Anderson's,5914 30th Virginia, Anderson's,3811 14th Alabama, Anderson's,34447 Holcomb's Legion,Evans's, 24131155 18th South-Carolina,Evans's, 2786113 Carried forward,  49729123411 Brought forward,  49729123411 23d S
was dark, and resumed the march at daylight. Mahone advanced cautiously, captured many prisoners, erful battery of rifled guns opened on us. General Mahone disposed his troops, and advanced a batterkets were accordingly established by Brigadier-Generals Mahone and Wright, whose brigades slept on s report, that, in the charge, the brigades of Mahone and Wright came up immediately on his right, Cy respectfully, Your obedient servant, William Mahone, Brigadier-General. Official: A. G. Dickhich proved to be a small body under Brigadier-Generals Mahone and Wright. In the mean time, partithree regiments being still in advance of Generals Mahone and Wright's brigade, which came up immeddered by him to advance, supported by Brigadier-General Mahone's brigade, upon the enemy's right, an pressed, warmly and strongly supported by General Mahone's brigade, under a murderous fire of shot,ree hundred, with about an equal number of General Mahone's brigade, held our position under the ver[33 more...]
Plains, Boonsboroa, and Sharpsburg. Brigadier-General Mahone, at Manassas Plains, where he receiveright's Brigade72515135 8190 3225167331258448 Mahone's Brigade43418178  234 812805122227461 ArmistFeatherston'sAnderson's,65258 Twelfth VirginiaMahone's,Anderson's,33639 Sixteenth VirginiaMahone'sMahone's,Anderson's, 55 Sixth VirginiaMahone's,Anderson's,41923 Forty-first VirginiaMahone's,Anderson's,18Mahone's,Anderson's,41923 Forty-first VirginiaMahone's,Anderson's,189 Fourth VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's,32124 Fifth VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's,22628 Twenty-seventh VMahone's,Anderson's,189 Fourth VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's,32124 Fifth VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's,22628 Twenty-seventh VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's,358 Thirty-third VirginiaWinder's,Jackson's,31619 BatteriesWinder's,Jack south of Crampton's Gap) with his own and General Mahone's brigade, commanded by Colonel Parham, wi of the brigades of Generals Cobb, Semmes, and Mahone, and that of Wilcox, Kershaw, and Barksdale, wwas first in command, and from Colonel Parham, Mahone's brigade, who came next after, and made the d Gap. Those of Generals Cobb, and Semmes, and Mahone, (Colonel Parham,) had been engaged and badly <
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