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The Daily Dispatch: May 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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n1 1 Anderson'sWillcox's11th Alabama358 Anderson'sMahone's6th Virginia 11 Anderson'sMahone's41st Virginia24Mahone's41st Virginia246 Anderson'sMahone's61st Virginia 11    1687103 Pickett'sKemper's1st Virginia 99 Pickett'sKemper's3d VirgiMahone's61st Virginia 11    1687103 Pickett'sKemper's1st Virginia 99 Pickett'sKemper's3d Virginia 55 Pickett'sKemper's7th Virginia 44 Pickett'sKemper's11th Virginia 1313 Pickett'sKemper's24th Virginia ft, in the following order: Featherston's, Perry's, Mahone's, Wright's, and Wilcox's brigades. In the afterut shelter and without fire. It is due to Brigadier-General Mahone to say that he discovered and pointed out rmed in line of battle, my right resting on General Mahone's left, and my left upon General Wilcox's right. IGeneral, commanding Brigade. Report of Brigadier-General Mahone. headquarters Mahone's brigade, AnderMahone's brigade, Anderson's division, December 21, 1862. To Major T. S. Mills, Assistant Adjutant-General, Anderson's Division: Mr, very respectfully, Your obedient servant, William Mahone, Brigadier-General. Report of Col.
, offered no further opposition to his march. Mahone was placed on the old turnpike, Wright and Pos; McLaws, with his three brigades, preceded by Mahone's, on the latter. Generals Wilcox and Perry, tter place. After consultation with Brigadier-Generals Mahone and Posey, and an examination of the The advance commenced at eleven o'clock A. M. Mahone's brigade with Jordan's battery of Alexder's b force was advanced towards Chancellorsville. Mahone's brigade having its right on the plank road, me to advance along the turnpike road, having Mahone's brigade, of Anderson's division, in advance.able distance. I now strengthened the left of Mahone's, which was strongly threatened, with two regninth ultimo, being then in camp with Brigadier-General Mahone, near the United States Ford, we wereMississippi regiment,) and one regiment of General Mahone's brigade, to watch and defend the United of the plank road at Chancellorsville, and General Mahone's brigade in Ballard's and Nixley's fields[43 more...]
ght with the left of that corps. The other brigades of my division were then ordered up, and the line was formed as quickly as the nature of the ground would permit. During these movements of my command, Heth's division became hotly engaged, and a brigade of his troops, near the left of my division, was driven back. The enemy's skirmishers advanced through the gap, and General Long found it impracticable to post his artillery. Perry's brigade checked the further advance of the enemy, and Mahone's was put in motion to regain the ground from which our men had been driven, but before it reached the place, it was reoccupied by another brigade of Heth's division. Perry's and Posey's brigade then drove back the enemy's line of skirmishers, and General Long's artillery got into position; but it was now nearly dark, and, after a few minutes' cannonading, to which the enemy replied warmly, the firing was discontinued. The troops of my division remained in line of battle during the night
hteenth. The Confederates were driven back Mahone, the hero of the Crater General William MaGeneral William Mahone, C. S. A. It was through the promptness and valor of General Mahone that the Southerners, on JuGeneral Mahone that the Southerners, on July 30, 1864, were enabled to turn back upon the Federals the disaster threatened by the hidden mine.k the Federals massing at the Crater until General Mahone arrived at the head of three brigades. Atent were advancing to the left of the Crater. Mahone ordered a counter-charge. In his inspiring prs corps were advancing against them. Hill led Mahone's division through a ravine close by. Screenedre being rapidly reenforced. At eight o'clock Mahone's division of Georgians and Virginians swept oonfederates burst suddenly upon the Federals. Mahone thrust his gallant division through the Federa too great. This Fort was named after General William Mahone, who was conspicuously engaged in the the terrific charge, and the serried ranks of Mahone fell back. The Weldon Railroad was lost to th
hteenth. The Confederates were driven back Mahone, the hero of the Crater General William MaGeneral William Mahone, C. S. A. It was through the promptness and valor of General Mahone that the Southerners, on JuGeneral Mahone that the Southerners, on July 30, 1864, were enabled to turn back upon the Federals the disaster threatened by the hidden mine.k the Federals massing at the Crater until General Mahone arrived at the head of three brigades. Atent were advancing to the left of the Crater. Mahone ordered a counter-charge. In his inspiring prs corps were advancing against them. Hill led Mahone's division through a ravine close by. Screenedre being rapidly reenforced. At eight o'clock Mahone's division of Georgians and Virginians swept oonfederates burst suddenly upon the Federals. Mahone thrust his gallant division through the Federa too great. This Fort was named after General William Mahone, who was conspicuously engaged in the the terrific charge, and the serried ranks of Mahone fell back. The Weldon Railroad was lost to th
ttox, where the South Side Railroad crosses the river on piers 60 feet high. Hancock's (Second) Corps arrived on the south bank just after the Confederates had blown up the redoubt that formed the bridge head, and set fire to the bridge itself. The bridge was saved with the loss of four spans at the north end, by Colonel Livermore, whose party put out the fire while Confederate skirmishers were fighting under their feet. A wagon bridge beside it was saved by the men of Barlow's division. Mahone's division of the Confederate army was drawn up on a hill, north of the river behind redoubts, but when Union troops appeared in force the Confederates again retreated westward along the river. High bridge over the Appomattox High bridge over the Appomattox letter of the 8th instant, they are accepted. I will proceed to designate the proper officers to carry the stipulation into effect. R. E. Lee, General. Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant. When Federal officers were seen gallopin
ttox, where the South Side Railroad crosses the river on piers 60 feet high. Hancock's (Second) Corps arrived on the south bank just after the Confederates had blown up the redoubt that formed the bridge head, and set fire to the bridge itself. The bridge was saved with the loss of four spans at the north end, by Colonel Livermore, whose party put out the fire while Confederate skirmishers were fighting under their feet. A wagon bridge beside it was saved by the men of Barlow's division. Mahone's division of the Confederate army was drawn up on a hill, north of the river behind redoubts, but when Union troops appeared in force the Confederates again retreated westward along the river. High bridge over the Appomattox High bridge over the Appomattox letter of the 8th instant, they are accepted. I will proceed to designate the proper officers to carry the stipulation into effect. R. E. Lee, General. Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant. When Federal officers were seen gallopin
aniards. General Butler died at Columbus, S. C., April 14, 1909. Major-General William Mahone was born at Monroe, Southampton County, Virginia, December 1, 18eral in the Confederate Army in March, 1864. In the battle of Seven Pines, General Mahone commanded a brigade in Huger's Division, while at Malvern Hill also his troops were engaged. General Mahone also fought in the Chancellorsville and Gettysburg campaigns, as well as in the Wilderness. At the North Anna on May 24th, General General Mahone made a desperate attack on Warren's Corps, driving it back. On August 3, 1864, General Mahone was promoted to be major-general. He was active in the brillianGeneral Mahone was promoted to be major-general. He was active in the brilliant repulse of the Federal attack after the explosion of the mine at Petersburg and in the various operations about the Weldon Railroad. General Mahone was present at tGeneral Mahone was present at the last struggles of the war, and was paroled at Appomattox Court House, April 9, 1865. After the war he was made president of the Norfolk and Tennessee Railroad and
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
, April 20, 1864. Huger, Benj., Oct. 7, 1861. Johnson, B. R., May 21, 1864. Johnson, Edward, Feb. 28, 1863. Jones, David R., Oct. 11, 1862. Jones, Samuel, Mar. 10, 1862. Kemper, J. L., Sept. 19, 1864. Kershaw, J. B., May 18, 1864. Lee, Fitzhugh, Aug. 3, 1863. Lee, G. W. Custis, Oct. 20, 1864. Lee, W. H. F., Apr. 23, 1864. Loring, W. W., Feb. 17, 1862. Lovell, Mansfield, Oct. 7, 1861. McCown, John P., Mar. 10, 1862. McLaws, L., May 23, 1862. Magruder, J. B., Oct. 7, 1861. Mahone, William, July 30, 1864. Marmaduke, J. S., Mar. 17, 1865. Martin, Will T., Nov. 10, 1863. Maury, D. H., Nov. 4, 1862. Polignac, C. J., April 8, 1864. Pender, W. D., May 27, 1863. Pickett, George E., Oct. 10, 1862. Price, Sterling, Mar. 6, 1862. Ransom, R., Jr. , May 26, 1863. Rodes, Robert E., May 2, 1863. Smith, G. W., Sept. 19, 1861. Smith, Martin L., Nov. 4, 1862. Smith, William, Aug. 12, 1863. Stevenson, C. L., Oct. 10, 1862. Stuart, J. E. B., July 25, 1862. Taylor, Richard, J
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
without comment of our own, leaving our readers to sift the evidence and form their own conclusions.] A brief notice will be made of inaccuracies in the book, Four years with General Lee, recently published by Colonel Taylor, the Adjutant-General of the Army of Northern Virginia. Page 50. Referring to reinforcements that joined General Johnston after he had reached the vicinity of Richmond, May, 1862, says: He was reinforced by Huger's division, consisting of three brigades under Generals Mahone, Armistead and Wright. One of Huger's brigades, preceding and including Seven Pines, was commanded by General Blanchard. This brigade may have been subsequently known as Wright's brigade. Page 71. Enumerating the Confederate forces engaged at Sharpsburg, says: The command of General Longstreet at that time embraced six brigades under D. R. Jones, the two under General Hood and one unattached under General Evans. His other three brigades were temporarily detached under General R. H
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