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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 27: Gettysburg-Second day. (search)
ese reports, which go to show that it was one o'clock in the afternoon when the Third Corps, upon which the First Corps was to form, was in position. Under the conduct of the reconnoitring officer, our march seemed slow,--there were some halts and countermarches. To save time, I ordered the rear division to double on the front, and we were near the affair of Anderson's regiments with the outpost guard of Sickles. Anderson's division deployed,--Wilcox's, Perry's, Wright's, Posey's, and Mahone's brigades from right to left. General Hood was ordered to send his select scouts in advance, to go through the woodlands and act as vedettes, in the absence of cavalry, and give information of the enemy, if there. The double line marched up the slope and deployed,--McLaws on the right of Anderson, Hood's division on his right, McLaws near the crest of the plateau in front of the Peach Orchard, Hood spreading and enveloping Sickles's left. The former was readily adjusted to ground from
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
Lieut.-Col. Hilary A. Herbert; 9th Ala., Capt. J. H. King; 10th Ala., Col. William H. Forney, Lieut.-Col. James E. Shelley; 11th Ala., Col. J. C. C. Sanders, Lieut.-Col. George E. Tayloe; 14th Ala., Col. L. Pinckard, Lieut.-Col. James A. Broome. Mahone's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William Mahone; 6th Va., Col. George T. Rogers; 12th Va., Col. D. A. Weisiger; 16th Va., Col. Joseph H. Ham; 41st Va., Col. William A. Parham ; 61st Va., Col. V. D. Groner. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright, Col. WilBrig.-Gen. William Mahone; 6th Va., Col. George T. Rogers; 12th Va., Col. D. A. Weisiger; 16th Va., Col. Joseph H. Ham; 41st Va., Col. William A. Parham ; 61st Va., Col. V. D. Groner. Wright's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Wright, Col. William Gibson; 3d Ga., Col. E. J. Walker; 22d Ga., Col. Joseph Wasden, Capt. B. C. McCurry; 48th Ga., Col. William Gibson, Capt. M. R. Hall; 2d Ga. Battn., Maj. George W. Ross, Capt. Charles J. Moffett. Perry's Brigade, Col. David Lang; 2d Fla., Maj. W. R. Moore; 5th Fla., Capt. R. N. Gardner; 8th Fla., Col. David Lang. Posey's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Carnot Posey; 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor; 16th Miss., Col. Samuel E. Baker; 19th Miss., Col. N. H. Harris; 48th Miss., Col. Joseph M. Jayne. Artille
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 38: battle of the Wilderness. (search)
as supports, and R. H. Anderson's division of the Third Corps. Colonel Sorrel, chief of staff, was ordered to conduct three brigades, G. T. Anderson's of Field's, Mahone's of R. H. Anderson's, and Wofford's of Kershaw's division, by the route recommended by General Smith, have them faced to the left, and marched down against Hancoak, first slowly, then rapidly. Somehow, as they retreated, a fire was accidentally started in the dry leaves, and began to spread as the Confederates advanced. Mahone's brigade approached the burning leaves and part of it broke off a little to get around, but the Twelfth Virginia was not obstructed by the blaze and moved directbroke up in hasty retreat. Field's brigades closed to fresh ranks; the flanking brigades drew into line near the Plank road, and with them the other regiments of Mahone's brigade; but the Twelfth Regiment, some distance in advance of the others, had crossed the road to strike at Wadsworth's left before the other regiments were i
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 39: again in front of Richmond. (search)
ond Corps, under Hancock, to be supported by parts of the Fifth and Ninth Corps. General Lee had his Third Corps (A. P. Hill's), Heth's and Wilcox's divisions and Mahone's in reserve. Hancock's advance was met by Mahone's division, and the entire march of the different commands was arrested after a severe rencounter, in which MahMahone's division, and the entire march of the different commands was arrested after a severe rencounter, in which Mahone got a number of prisoners and some pieces of artillery,--the latter not brought off, as the enemy held the bridge. According to the reports of the Adjutant-General's Office the Federal losses were 1284. The Confederate losses were not accurately accounted for, but the Federal accounts claimed two hundred prisoners taken aMahone got a number of prisoners and some pieces of artillery,--the latter not brought off, as the enemy held the bridge. According to the reports of the Adjutant-General's Office the Federal losses were 1284. The Confederate losses were not accurately accounted for, but the Federal accounts claimed two hundred prisoners taken at one time, and other losses equal to their own. I was informed of troops crossing the bridge to the north side on the 25th, and that the crossings continued at intervals till after the night of the 26th. The plan of operations contemplated that General Butler should have twenty thousand men north of the James where Longstree
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 41: battle of five Forks. (search)
times were looked upon as urgent. The quartermaster was despatched to Richmond to have the transportation at the station as soon as the troops could reach the depot, and the division was ordered to march in anticipation of due preparation for their transit. But the quartermaster found that the railroad company could furnish transportation for three brigades only. General Lee was informed of the fact, and I suggested that his only way to be assured of the service of a division was to draw Mahone's from Bermuda Hundred and have Pickett's march to replace it. He preferred part of Pickett's division,finding it could not be used as a division, as Pickett, the ranking officer, would be called to command the work during the early morning, for which he had no opportunity to prepare. General Lee collected about eighteen thousand men near the sallying field, ordered men selected to cut away the fraise and abatis for the storming column that should advance with empty guns (to avoid premat
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 42: Petersburg. (search)
ir startled cover, and the solid pounding upon Mahone's defensive walls drove the foxes from their ls at the former, but was repulsed when he met Mahone's strong line. At Petersburg he had more succe to cross the Appomattox at the bridge there, Mahone's division to march to Chesterfield Court-Housed near Manchester and pursued its march. General Mahone marched on his line just mentioned. Af Heth's division was put in support of Wilcox, Mahone to support Field. Just then I learned that Oras to the disaster at Sailor's Creek. He drew Mahone's division away, and took it back to find the r from them. Then turning to me, he said, General Mahone, I have no other troops, will you take youirect him in the matter, which he did. General Mahone withdrew at eleven o'clock at night throug attack got in as far as Poague's battery, but Mahone recovered it, and then drove off an attack agaand took in some three hundred prisoners, General Mahone claimed seven hundred in all. the last of [11 more...]
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 43: Appomattox. (search)
Lee, A. L. Long. A little after nightfall a flag of truce appeared under torchlight in front of Mahone's line bearing a note to General Lee: Headquarters Armies of the United States, 5 P. M., April quarters. He thought not. Then, I said, your situation speaks for itself. He called up General Mahone, and made to him a similar statement of affairs. The early morning was raw and damp. GenerGeneral Mahone was chilled standing in wait without fire. He pushed up the embers and said to the general he did not want him to think he was scared, he was only chilled. General Mahone sometimes liked tGeneral Mahone sometimes liked to talk a little on questions of moment, and asked several questions. My attention was called to messages from the troops for a time, so that I failed to hear all of the conversation, but I heard enough of it to know that General Mahone thought it time to see General Grant. Appeal was made to me to affirm that judgment, and it was promptly approved. General Grant had been riding with his colu
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 22: from Cold Harbor to evacuation of Richmond and Petersburg (search)
winter camps. We were not responsible for being now, as it were, mustered out of service; yet we could not repress a vague feeling that, somehow, we were not doing our full duty. Especially was this feeling intensified when, a few months later, Mahone's division, which had been manning a very trying part of the Petersburg lines, was brought over between the Appomattox and the James to relieve Pickett's, which was sent north of the James. We thought we had before seen men with the marks of hard service upon them; but the appearance of this division of Mahone's, and particularly of Finnegan's Florida brigade, with which we happened to be most closely associated, made us realize, for the first time, what our comrades in the hottest Petersburg lines were undergoing. We were shocked at the condition, the complexion, the expression of the men, and of the officers, too, even the field officers; indeed we could scarcely realize that the unwashed, uncombed, unfed and almost unclad creatures
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
ward S.: family of, 294- 96; mentioned, 74, 85, 95, 159-60, 229, 260, 271, 291, 293-96. McClellan, George Brinton, 74, 79, 88-89, 92-95, 101-104, 106-108, 125-26, 285 McDowell, Battle of, 218 McDaniel, Henry Dickerson, 220-21. McGowan, Samuel, 57-58. McGuire, Hunter Holmes, 105, 245-46, 351 McLaws, Lafayette: described, 223; mentioned, 129, 165, 168-69, 173- 79, 182, 192, 222-24, 231, 270 Machine guns, 76-77. Magruder, John Bankhead, 75, 79-80, 94-97, 102, 107, 160 Mahone, William, 311 Malvern Hill, 41, 96-97, 101-18, 130, 146, 309 Manassas, Va.: first battle of, 41, 44- 48, 59, 111, 324; second battle of, 118-24, 191 Manly's Battery (N. C.), 154, 168, 301, 310 Marse Robert, 18-21. Marshall, Charles, 226 Mascots, 170-72. Massachusetts Infantry: 20th Regiment, 130 Maury, Matthew Fontaine, 79 Maury, Richard Launcelot, 79 Meade, George Gordon: Lee's comments on, 227-28; mentioned, 207, 222, 237, 288 Mechanicsville, Va., 93-94. Nort
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
Smith (w). Brigade loss: k, 149; w, 680; m. 37 = 866. Huger's division, Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Huger. Armistead's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Armistead: 5th Va. Battalion; 9th Va., Col. D. J. Godwin (w); 14th Va.; 53d Va., Col. H. B. Tomlin. Mahone's Brigade, Brig.-Gren. William Mahone: 3d Ala., Col. Tennent Lomax (k) ; 12th Va.; 41st Va. Blanchard's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. G. Blanchard: 3d Ga.; 4th Ga.; 22d Ga.; 1st La, artillery (not previously mentioned) La. Battery, Capt. Victor MaurWilliam Mahone: 3d Ala., Col. Tennent Lomax (k) ; 12th Va.; 41st Va. Blanchard's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. G. Blanchard: 3d Ga.; 4th Ga.; 22d Ga.; 1st La, artillery (not previously mentioned) La. Battery, Capt. Victor Maurin; Va. Battery, Capt. David Watson. Total loss of the Right Wing, as reported by Gen. Longstreet: 816 killed, 3739 wounded, and 296 missing = 4851. left wing, Major-General Gustavus W. Smith. Couriers: Capt. R. W. Carter's Co. 1st Va. Cav. Smith's division, Brig.-Gen. W. H. C. Whiting (temporarily). Whiting's Brigade, Col. E. McIver Law: 4th Ala.; 2d Miss.; 11th Miss.; 6th N. C. Brigade loss: k, 28; w, 286; m, 42 = 346. Hood's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John B. Hood: 18th Ga., Col. W. T. W
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