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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The plan to rescue the Johnson's Island prisoners. (search)
to carry them into execution; but it was only after repeated efforts that the Government was induced to take any active part in promoting the expedition, though Mr. Mallory, the Secretary of Navy, was in favor of it from the inception of the plan; but money, or rather the want of it, seemed to be the cause of delay, which, howevere, as the balance was, and still is, strongly against us. With this view I found myself one day, in August last, closeted with Mr. Seddon, Secretary of War, and Mr. Mallory, who asked me to give my views on the contents of a letter, a part of which Mr. Seddon read to me, containing a proposition for the release of our poor fellows.e engaged upon such duty. Well, sir, nearly a month of precious time passed away without my hearing another word on the subject, when one day I was sent for by Mr. Mallory, who told me to organize an expedition, select the officers, make all the necessary preparations, and then concluded by offering me the command of it, which, ho
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
I suggested my plan of seizing the Saint Nicholas, and carrying out the scheme that had suggested itself to me at Colonel S——'s. I was told that the Secretary (Mr. Mallory) would not agree to the plan, but that the Governor (Letcher) would. I then remarked that I would obtain Mr. Mallory's permission to apply to the Governor. I Mr. Mallory's permission to apply to the Governor. I walked into Mr. Mallory's room and asked his permission. He granted it, and I at once went straight to the Governor's. When I made my proposition, Governor Letcher, without a moments hesitation, acceded to the proposal, and gave me a draft for $1,000 to send North for arms and men, etc. He then and there introduced me to Colonel TMr. Mallory's room and asked his permission. He granted it, and I at once went straight to the Governor's. When I made my proposition, Governor Letcher, without a moments hesitation, acceded to the proposal, and gave me a draft for $1,000 to send North for arms and men, etc. He then and there introduced me to Colonel Thomas, of Maryland, alias Zarvona, as a person who could be trusted to go North to purchase arms, or transact other business. That same afternoon I started off for Point Lookout via Fredericksburg. After leaving Fredericksburg I met my two sons, who were on their way to Richmond; they joined me of course. That next evening we re
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
e came to the plank road, and turned up towards Chancellorsville. I felt as if I was on holy ground; for it was right along here that we marched the 1st day of May, thirty-three years ago, led by Lee and Jackson, and A. P. Hill, and Heth, and Mallory. It is just about as warm and dusky now as then. We soon came to the road that we took to the left by The Furnace, but our time being limited, we conclude it is not sufficient to take the route we marched around Hooker's army; so we take the s swept by such a destructive artillery fire as can only be imagined. I don't believe the like was ever known before or since. The darkness and the fire combined render it impossible to execute the movement. The men drop on the ground. Colonel Mallory calls upon the officers to do their duty (the last words he ever spoke). My company, which was the right company of the regiment, was wheeled to the left and marched through the storm down to the color line. How beautifully the company resp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
crew in May, 1864. These were the first vessels ever injured in war by any system of electrical defences. In a long letter from the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, to me after the war, he says: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending the James river to co-opercontemplated attack on Drewry's Bluff to which I referred in my first letter to you, and concerning which I quoted from the letter of the Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, occurred in 1864, as clearly shown in my letter and in Mr. Mallory's words, which I here repeat: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Mr. Mallory's words, which I here repeat: The destruction of the Commodore Jones, the leading vessel of Admiral Lee's fleet, which was ascending James river to co-operate with General Butler in the attack on Drewry's Bluff, by causing the retirement of that fleet, undoubtedly saved Drewry's Bluff, the key to Richmond. How widely different in date and nature are the two circumstances, and yet you, of all persons, confuse them, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
chmond were taking part in the charades, and some of the most brilliant officers of the army. There were present Mr. Davis, Mr. Stephens, Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary Mallory, Mrs. Mallory—in fact, all the cabinet officers and their wives, the representatives in Congress, justices of the Supreme Court, etc., and General Stuart wasMrs. Mallory—in fact, all the cabinet officers and their wives, the representatives in Congress, justices of the Supreme Court, etc., and General Stuart was the observed of all observers, as he gaily led the charades. He was so brilliant, so handsome and daring, that he was called the Prince Rupert of the Confederacy, as he used to dash around Richmond on his noble charger, with his black plume flying in the breeze. That night he left the smiling throng with a flower that some pred's history bears no purer or greater name than that of Robert Lee. Many reminiscences did Mr. Semmes recall of Mason and Slidell, Yancey and Breckenridge, and Mallory and Stephens, Beauregard and Johnston. He remembered as though it were only yesterday, every incident of that war, and spoke of the death of Albert Sidney Johns
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Harper's Ferry and first Manassas. (search)
ghest pitch, and especially filling our two companies, the Southern Guard, Captain E. S. Hutter, and the Sons of Liberty, Captain J. Tosh, with an earnest desire to lend a hand in the defence of our State. The taking of Harper's Ferry was the first object that presented itself to our minds, and when, on Wednesday, Captain Duke returned from Richmond with authority to take 300 men to Harper's Ferry, our two companies, with the Albemarle Rifles, Captain Duke, and the Monticello Guards, Captain Mallory, from Charlottesville, offered our services. We immediately got ready, and that night, when the train from Staunton, with the West Augusta Guards, the Mountain Guards, and Imboden's Battery, from Augusta county, came along, we joined them and went on to Harper's Ferry, taking up different volunteer companies all along the railroad, until, when we reached Strasburg about 12 o'clock Thursday, where we had to take it afoot, our force was quite formidable, numbering some eight or ten compa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Thomas R. R. Cobb. (search)
ettle down on $8 per day and 10 cents mileage. This will pay me the enormous sum of $300 for which I have lost I doubt not in my private business $3,000. I am urging Congress to take no pay and set an example of patriotism. The nomination of Mr. Mallory as Secretary of the Navy was confirmed after a struggle. His soundness on the secession question was doubted. March 5.—The President appealed to me again to go to Arkansas but I positively refused. This morning he and Mrs. Davis took there sworn in to-day have given us more confidence in that State. She is in earnest. In addition to this the good news of the secession of Arkansas and Tennessee have kept the cannon booming all day. If we could only get rid of Lee Walker and Mallory The Secretaries of War and Navy. and the Lord would kill off Governor Letcher and his General Gwynn at Norfolk, I should feel like shouting to-night. I am satisfied that General Scott will make no attack on Virginia. May 10—Would to God
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crenshaw Battery, Pegram's Battalion, Confederate States Artillery. (search)
rney brought us to the foot of Cash Mountain, where we had several men captured. Owing to the long and continuous marching of the battalion, the stock of horse flesh had been considerably reduced, and in order that the currency of the Confederacy might have a more extended and healthful circulation—that the miniature portrait of our beloved President might have more admirers —a party was made up headed by Lieutenant John Hampden Chamberlayne of our battery, with Sergeants Smith, Newman and Mallory, besides several others of the battalion, and started out in the mountains to purchase horses. The party soon came upon the picketpost of the Jessie Scouts, of the Federal army, when Ham Chamberlayne picked out about half a dozen of the men who were armed with revolvers, put himself at the head of them and led a charge. The picket-guard fell back on the regiment, and the whole party were captured and sent to prison. We remained here two days, waiting presumably for our army to close up (
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.8 (search)
. It is true that Captain Farrand, who had been run out from Mobile, was sent down; he messed with me and would occasionally sally out to look after his defunct navy, but his being there was more of an accident than otherwise, and he did not undertake to interfere with my command in the fort, which bore the brunt of the fight, and I am not aware that any man connected with the navy put his hand upon any gun in the fort during that engagement. After the fight, Captain Farrand reported to Mr. Mallory for the navy, and I, upon the recommendation of General Mahone, who witnessed the engagement, reported to Governor Letcher, who communicated with the Secretary of War, and upon their recommendation, I was promoted to major of artillery, and in the body of my commission, directed to remain in command of Fort Drewry, which I did until it was determined to make a naval post out of it, in command of Captain Lee, and my command was revoked with instruction to report to Brigadier-General John
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
e interior of North Carolina. The peremptory order of General Joseph E. Johnston for the abandonment of the navy-yard was communicated to Capt. S. S. Lee by Secretary Mallory, in a letter dated Richmond, May 3, 1862. The work of evacuation was expected to be accomplished in two weeks. The citizens at first would not believe the red while the vessel was in the dry dock, and when the time came to let water into the dock and float her, by direction of the Confederate Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Mallory, she was named Virginia. On Saturday, March 8, 1862, under the command of Flag Officer Franklin Buchanan, she started for Hampton Roads on her trial trip, anrief. Captain Buchanan's report embraced the operations of both days, March 8th and 9th. It is dated Naval Hospital, March 27th, 1862, and was forwarded to Secretary Mallory, who turned it over to Jefferson Davis, and was by the latter submitted to the Confederate Congress on the 10th of April, 1862. The report of Lieutenant Jon
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