Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for Mann or search for Mann in all documents.

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ucky Infantry. No. 61.--Col. Benjamin H. Bristow, Twenty-fifth Kentucky Infantry. No. 62.-Maj. William B. Wall, Twenty-fifth Kentucky Infantry. No. 63.-Lieut. Cuthbert W. Laing, Second Michigan Battery. No. 64.-Lieut. Edward Brotzmann, Mann's battery Missouri Light Artillery. No. 65.-Brig. Gen. William T. Sherman, U. S. Army, commanding Fifth Division. No. 66.-Col. John A. McDowell, Sixth Iowa Infantry, commanding First Brigade. No. 67.-Capt. John Williams, Sixth Iowa Infant7 3 24 27       34 Total Third Brigade 4 66 70 15 369 384   4 4 458 not brigaded.                     5th Ohio Cavalry, First and Second Battalions.   1 1   6 6       7 13th Ohio Battery   1 1   8 8       9 Missouri Light Artillery, Mann's battery.   3 3 2 12 14       17 2d Michigan Battery         5 5 3 53 56 61 Total Fourth Division 18 299 317 70 1,371 1,441 7 104 111 1,869 Fifth Division.                     Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherma
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
s and Veatch's brigades, which were posted on the right and left of the main Corinth road, looking directly south. For some time I was in doubt whether the artillery fire we had sustained had come from the enemy's fixed or field batteries, and intended to move forward at great hazard to ascertain the fact, when about 3 p. m. we were startled by the quick rattle of musketry along our whole picket line, followed by the cheers and yells of an attacking column of the enemy. Our artillery and Mann's battery of Veatch's brigade had been judiciously posted by Major Taylor, and before the yell of the enemy had died away arose our reply in the cannon's voice. The firing was very good, rapid, and well directed, and the shells burst in the right place. Our pickets were at first driven in a little, but soon recovered their ground and held it, and the enemy retreated in utter confusion. On further examination of the ground, with its connection on the left with General Hurlbut and right rest