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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 80 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 25 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 12 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
other wagons. Following these as a reserve were the Sixteenth Alabama, Colonel Wood, and Branner's and McClellan's battalions of cavalry. The whole force was between four and five thousand strong. At early dawn, Zollicoffer's advance met the Union pickets. General Thomas had been advised of this movement. He had made! dispositions accordingly, and the pickets, encountered by the Confederate vanguard, were of Woolford's cavalry. These fell slowly back, and Woolford reported to Colonel M. D. Manson, of the Tenth Indiana, who was in command of the Second Brigade, stationed in advance of the main body. That officer formed his own and the Fourth Kentucky (Colonel S. S. Fry) in battle order, at the junction of the Somerset and Mill Spring Roads, about five miles from the latter place, to await attack, and then sent a courier to inform Thomas of the situation. The commanding general hastened forward to view the position, when he found the Confederates advancing through a corn-field
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
hmond it was met by the force organized by Wallace and then commanded by General M. D. Manson, for Nelson had not arrived. That force was superior to Smith's in the number of its men and weapons; but it was largely composed of raw troops. Yet Manson pressed forward to meet the invader. They came in collision a little beyond Rogersville, Aug. 30, 1862. and a severe battle was fought for three hours, when Manson was driven back, fighting gallantly. At this juncture Nelson arrived and tooks were utterly routed and scattered in all directions. Nelson was wounded, and Manson resumed command; but the day was lost. Smith's cavalry had gained the rear of ls, and stood in the way of their wild flight. The disaster was terrible. General Manson, hurt by his horse falling on him, was made a prisoner: a fate shared by sehe National loss was estimated at about 5,000, killed, wounded, and prisoners. Manson was well supported in the struggle by General Cruft, who, as we have seen, dist
the Tennessee and Cumberland Kirby Smith routs M. D. Manson and Nelson at Richmond, Ky. Bragg captures 4,00ual in numbers to his own, under command of Brig.-Gen. M. D. Manson, who immediately pushed forward to engage h line gave way. Using two of these as a rear-guard, Manson attempted to halt and reform just beyond Rogersvill; and again — having been driven back to his camp — Manson was trying to reform and make head, when, Gen. Nels prepare for and intercept the expected fugitives. Manson, who had resumed command when Nelson fell, had formeeing rabble were halted by a body of Rebel horse. Manson, hurrying up, attempted to form a vanguard; but onlvery one attempting to save himself as he could. Gen. Manson, with other officers, attempting escape by flightmany if not most of his compatriots in disaster. Manson's report says that his entire force this day did nostory, though exaggerated, is nearer the truth than Manson's. Smith set forward directly Sept. 1. for Le
ed at Franklin, 683. Manning, Col., wounded at Antietam, 207. Mansfield, Gen. J. K. F., killed at Antietam, 206. Manson, Brig.-Gen. Mahlon D., defeated by Col. Preston, 214; wounded and taken prisoner, 215; his report and losses, 215. Man 1864--its results, 654. Presidential Election, account of the, 671-2. Preston, Col., defeats Union levies under Gen. Manson, at Richmond, Ky., 214; at Chickamauga, 422. Price, Gen. Sterling, 26; abandons Missouri, 27; at Pea Ridge, 28; wourael B., at Malvern Hill, 165; at South Mountain, 198; at Antietam, 207; killed, 208. Richmond, Ky., Kirby Smith routs Manson and then Nelson at, 215. Richmond, Va., siege of, raised, 168; operations near, 173; demonstration made on, 394; Grant, killed at Antietam, 209. Rogers, commander Geo. W., killed at the assault on Fort Wagner, 478. Rogersville, Ky., Manson fights Kirby Smith near, 214. Rosecrans, Gen. Wm. S., succeeds Buell in command of the Army of the Ohio, 222; he atta
g to cross. On the following morning, Capt. Wetmore's battery was ordered to Russell's house, and assisted, with his Parrott guns, in firing upon the ferry. Col. Manson's brigade took position on the left, near Kinney's battery, and every preparation was made to assault their intrenchments on the following morning. The Fourtom this point I ordered a company of the Ninth Ohio to skirmish the woods on the right to prevent any flank movement of the enemy. Shortly after this Colonel. Manson, commanding the Second brigade in person, informed me that the enemy were in force and in position on the top of the next hill beyond the woods, and that they fornesota regiment in the action of the Cumberland, on the nineteenth inst. About seven o'clock on the morning of that day, and before breakfast, I was informed by Col. Manson, of the Tenth Indiana, commanding the Second brigade of our division, that the enemy were advancing in force, and that he was holding them in check, and that it
u. I am, sir, very respectfully, yours, M. D. Manson, Brigadier-General Commanding Forces at Rie it could be completed we were ordered by General Manson to move across the road and charge a battere lines of battle were formed by order of General Manson. The men fought gallantly, defending even the Sixteenth received orders to march. Gen. Manson rode along the lines, speaking cheering worfifth behind the battery in an open wood. General Manson with his staff was here. With most of thor lines, which began to give back. I heard Gen. Manson say, as he ordered Cruft's brigade into posdrawn up in line, cutting off all retreat. Gen. Manson, with Col. Lucas and Major Orr, tore down tg, when a shell burst near him. I had hoped Gen. Manson had escaped, but he was soon brought in. Th-stricken men, and by their conduct enabled Gen. Manson, the senior officer on the field, to make aed that nothing further could be done, left Gen. Manson in charge of the column, and placing himsel[10 more...]
u. I am, sir, very respectfully, yours, M. D. Manson, Brigadier-General Commanding Forces at Rint between Rogersville and Kingston, where General Manson's brigade had already engaged the enemy. en the Sixteenth received orders to march. Gen. Manson rode along the lines, speaking cheering worin front. By order of Col. Lucas I rode to Gen. Manson, who had established himself three hundred re. Perhaps they did well, but I know that Gen. Manson greatly blamed them for starting the confusr lines, which began to give back. I heard Gen. Manson say, as he ordered Cruft's brigade into poseventy-first came gallantly forward, led by Gen. Manson, and scarcely had they met the shock when Lg, when a shell burst near him. I had hoped Gen. Manson had escaped, but he was soon brought in. Ths's Michigan battery and the brigade of Brig.-General Manson, composed of the Fifty-fifth, Sixty-six-stricken men, and by their conduct enabled Gen. Manson, the senior officer on the field, to make a[9 more...]
manned by ten thousand of the enemy, many of them perfectly fresh, and carried it in fifteen minutes. It is impossible for me now to give you the exact results of these glorious battles. Our loss is comparatively small; that of the enemy many hundred killed and wounded, and several thousand prisoners. We have captured artillery, small arms and wagons. Indeed, every thing indicates the almost entire annihilation of this force of the enemy. In the first two battles they were commanded by Gen. Manson; in the last by Gen. Nelson. . . . . . We have large numbers of adherents here . . . . . I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, E. Kirby Smith, Major-General Commanding. Kentucky Statesman account. After passing many weary months under the oppressions of the ruthless military despotism of Mr. Lincoln's administration, the people of this portion of Kentucky have at last been liberated by the conquering army of heroes under the command of Major-Gen. Kirby Smith. His
At Bull Run, or Manassas, he commanded a brigade with Leaders in the Atlanta campaign— group no. 2: commanders of brigades and divisions which fought under McPherson, Thomas and hooker in the campaign for Atlanta, summer of 1864 Thos. H. Ruger commanded a brigade under General Hooker. J. C. Veatch, division leader in the Sixteenth Army Corps. Morgan L. Smith, leader of the Second division, Fourteenth Corps. J. D. Cox commanded a division under General Schofield. M. D. Manson, brigade leader in the Twenty-third Corps. Charles Cruft commanded a brigade under General Stanley. J. A. J. Lightburn led a division in the Army of the Tennessee. W. L. Elliott, chief of Cavalry under General Thomas credit, and though it was routed he quickly restored its organization and morale, and for this he was made a brigadiergeneral of volunteers. Transferred to Kentucky to assist General Robert Anderson, his former commander, in organizing the Federals of Kentucky, he
the 57th regiment. Thomas C. H. Smith, promoted from the 1st Cavalry in 1862. Nathaniel C. McLean, originally Colonel of the 7th Infantry. E. B. Tyler, originally Colonel of the 7th Infantry. Twenty-third Army Corps Created April 27, 1863, out of troops in the Department of the Ohio, then headed by Major-General A. E. Burnside. The regiments forming it had been stationed in Kentucky, and Major-General G. L. Hartsuff was placed in command. He was succeeded by Brigadier-Generals M. D. Manson, J. D. Cox, Major-Generals George Stoneman, and J. M. Schofield. The corps fought in Eastern Tennessee and was besieged in Knoxville. As the Army of the Ohio, it went on the Atlanta campaign and after the capture of that city, it returned to Tennessee and was prominent at Franklin and Nashville. The corps was then (except two divisions) moved to North Carolina and captured Wilmington in February, 1865. It joined Sherman's army at Goldsboro and marched with it to Washington.
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