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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 23 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cold Harbor. June 1st, 1864. (search)
th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Edgar Perry. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Hiram Burnham: 8th Conn., Capt. Charles M. Coit; 10th N. H., Lieut.-Col. John Coughlin; 13th N. H., Col. Aaron F. Stevens; 118th N. Y., Capt. Levi S. Dominy. Third Brigade, Col. Guy V. Henry: 21st Conn., Lieut.-Col. Thomas F. Burpee; 40th Mass., Lieut.-Col. George E. Marshall; 92d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Hiram Anderson, Jr.; 58th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Montgomery Martin; 188th Pa., Lieut.-Col. George K. Bowen. Second division, Brig.-Gen. James H. Martindale. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George J. Stannard: 23d Mass., Col. Andrew Elwell; 25th Mass., Capt. Francis E. Goodwin; 27th Mass., Maj. William A. Walker; 9th N. J., Capt. Augustus Thompson; 89th N. Y., Col. H. S. Fairchild; 55th Pa., Capt. George H. Hill. Second Brigade, Col. Griffin A. Stedman: 11th Conn., Lieut.-Col. William C. Moegling; 8th Me., Maj. William M. McArthur; 2d N. H., Col. Edward L. Bailey; 12th N. H., Maj. John F. Langley; 148th N. Y., Col. George M. Guion. Third
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Eighteenth Corps at Cold Harbor. (search)
the duty of keeping the right flank secure. Martindale's division was to move down the stream to thcisely 4:30 on the morning of the 3d of June Martindale's command moved down the stream, out of the assault I made a personal inspection of General Martindale's front, and found that before again assertain the cause of the firing, I found that Martindale had anticipated matters, and that under his e following report to General Meade: General Martindale got into so hot a place that he was forc could not be spared for an assault. Of General Martindale's two brigades, Stannard's had been thor been repulsed, was holding the line between Martindale and Devens, and also endeavoring to keep dow and adding: I am sorry to hear that General Martindale is unable to assault. I have just heard in a dense thicket in the ravine down which Martindale had moved. A series of most unearthly screa At the close of the battle the front of General Martindale was less than two hundred yards from the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 11.81 (search)
d November 1st, 1864.--G. T. B. the retirement of our forces on the previous night from their first positions to the new line of defenses selected by me, as already explained, had so much surprised the assaulting columns as to induce their immediate commanders to additional prudence in their advance and to a complete halt in their operations. On that morning the troops arrayed against us consisted of Hancock's, Burnside's, and Warren's corps, with the larger portion of Smith's under General Martindale, and finally Neill's division from Wright's corps (the Sixth), strengthened by its whole artillery. This gave the enemy an aggregate of over 90,000 effectives. We had on our side, after Kershaw's arrival, but 15,000 men, no deduction being made for the casualties of the three preceding days. It was only later on, somewhere between 12 M. and 1 P. M., that Field's command was put in position on the line, and from that moment to the end of the day our grand total amounted to about 20,0