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hours with this regiment. On my return, Colonel Cass accompanied me as far as Fort Albany. On our way, we called on Major-General Porter, and arranged with him about receiving our Sixth Battery. We also called at the headquarters of Brigadier-General Martindale, but he was absent; but I was glad to find, in a tent near by, our old friend Dr. Lyman; also, Captain Batchelder, late of the Twenty-second Regiment, now on Martindale's staff. We then proceeded over fields of fallen timber, and acrMartindale's staff. We then proceeded over fields of fallen timber, and across ravines, for about four miles, to Fort Cass, which was constructed last summer by the Ninth, and named in honor of their colonel. After warming ourselves and drying our clothes, we started across the country towards Fort Albany, passing through several camps; among them, that of the Nineteenth Indiana, commanded by an old veteran friend of mine, Colonel Meredith. At Fort Albany, we parted with Colonel Cass; he returning to his regiment, and we to Washington, and reached our hotel about six
ten new regiments for three years service, saying nothing about the men sent forward to fill up the old regiments), we claim that we are entitled to two brigadier-generals on that score; and, for the seventeen regiments of nine months men, we are entitled to four more. We therefore recommend, first of all, Colonel James Barnes, of the Eighteenth, whom he describes as a long-headed, able man, of thorough military education, over fifty years old, served all last fall, winter, and spring, in Martindale's brigade, now an acting brigadier with McClellan; the most constant, unremitting, and careful of men. He deserved the first promotion, and would have got it, probably, but that his regiment happened not to be in battle, for which he was not to blame. His lieutentant-colonel (Hayes) is able to lead the regiment, if promoted to its command, with the highest honor. He deserves promotion. Colonel Barnes was made a brigadier-general Nov. 29, 1862, a few days after this letter was written
's lines, and very many amusing scenes occurred. At one time General Weitzel and his orderly got among the rebels, and the latter was captured. He called to Weitzel to save him, which was done by placing a pistol at the rebel's head and ordering him to yield his musket to the orderly, by whom lie was marched off. Tables of this kind were constantly turned. General Butler was out in the thick tempest of rifle-shells. One shot passed between him and Colonel Kensett, one of his aids. General Martindale's sword was struck by a shrapnel shot and indented greatly. While the fighting was going on toward Richmond, an attempt was made on the part of the enemy to attack in rear, by coming up from Petersburg. General Ames, of the Tenth corps, who commands in that direction, gallantly kept them at bay until the order was given to retire. Tenth Army corps, near City Point, Va., Friday Evening, May 20, 1864. There has been to-day a fierce and sanguinary battle on the spot which I mentio
king the rifle-pits. Here, however, he was swept by the fire from a redoubt in his front, and Martindale, who was ordered to his support, not having been able to effect his dispositions in time to do the right with the Sixth, had advanced in conjunction with it; but the left division, that of Martindale, who led the attack in heavy, deep columns, got disarranged, and was repulsed. General Smith made three different attacks to relieve Martindale, but his last supports did not get up in time to allow him to hold on. The effect of this repulse on the left of Smith had a disastrous effect upon tng the crests of hills, on several farms, two miles from Petersburg. In this engagement General Martindale's division of the Eighteenth corps, which suffered moderately in the action, held the righied the works in their front, which they now firmly hold. At nine o'clock two brigades of General Martindale's division, supported by Duncan's brigade, were advanced on the right, and carried the reb
nd more efficient staff officers never drew rein or sabre, viz.: Major William Russell, Assistant Adjutant-General; Captain M. A. Reno, First United States cavalry, Chief of Staff; Captain R. Ellis, Sixth Pennsylvania cavalry, Assistant Inspector-General; Captain George B. Sandford, First United States cavalry, Assistant Commissary Musters; Captain J. J. Coppinger, Fourteenth Infantry, United States Artillery, A. A. D. C.; Captain Bailey, First New York Lincoln cavalry, A. A. D. C.; Captain Martindale, First New York Lincoln cavalry, A. A. D. C.; Captain M. Berry, Twentieth Pennsylvania cavalry, A. A. D. C.; First Lieutenant Wallace, Fifth Michigan cavalry, A. A. D. C.; First Lieutenant Ellis, Sixth Pennsylvania cavalry, A. A. D. C.; First Lieutenant Slater, First New York dragoons, amb. officer; First Lieutenant H. H. Goldsmith, Fifteenth New Jersey volunteer infantry, A. D. C. I take pleasure in expressing my sincere thanks to division commanders and their commands for the hear
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 24: the winter camp at Falmouth. (search)
Capt. Moncena Dunn, returned to duty March 22nd. First Lieut. David B. Chubbuck, promoted from Second Lieut. to date Dec. 21, vice Newcomb died of wounds. On special duty in command Co. E. Second Lieut. John J. Ferris, promoted from 1st Serg. Co. E, to date Jan. 22, vice Adams, promoted. On special duty in command Co. H. Co. E.Capt. Andrew Mahoney, returned to duty Feb. 27. On special duty, acting as Field Officer. Co. G.Capt. C. M. Merritt, on detached service, serving on Brig. Gen. Martindale's staff. First Lieut. Dudley C. Mumford, disabled by a sprain. Second Lieut. William Stone, returned to duty Mar. 27, in command of Co. G. Co. H.Second Lieut. Thos. F. Winthrop, promoted from Q. M. Sergt. to date Dec. 21, vice Chubbuck, promoted. On special duty, acting Quartermaster. Co. I.First Lieut. J. G. B. Adams, promoted from 2nd Lieut. to date Jan. 22, vice Prime, discharged. In command of Co. I. Second Lieut. Herman Donath, promoted from Sergt. Major, to date Dec. 13,
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 32: in pursuit of Lee. In camp at Morrisville. (search)
ncena Dunn, on detached service, A. A.Q. M. artillery brigade, 2nd Corps. First Lieut. David F. Chubbuck, in command Co. D. Second Lieut. William E. Barrows, on detached service, A. A.D. C. 3d Brig. 2nd Div. 2nd Corps. Co. E.First Lieut. John P. Reynolds, Jr., absent in Massachusetts, wounded at Antietam, S. C. extends to Aug. 29, 1863, Second Lieut. E. A. Hall, Acting Adjutant. Second Lieut. John J. Ferris, in command Co. F. Co. G.Capt. C. M. Merritt, on detached service, at General Martindale's headquarters, Washington. First Lieut. Dudley C. Mumford, in command Co. G. Co. H.Second Lieut. Charles S. Palmer, in command Co. H. Co. I.Capt. Jonathan F. Plympton, performing duties of field officer. First Lieut. J. G. B. Adams, absent wounded in Massachusetts. First Lieut. William Stone, transferred to Invalid Corps, S. O. 173, Headquarters Second Corps, July 28, 1863. gain: By conscripts from depot,163 loss:6 Recruits required to fill quota,497 died as result
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 33: the advance to Culpepper and Bealton. (search)
every morning. The regimental return for September, 1863, is as follows: Col. Devereux, still on detached service, Boston harbor. Lieut. Col. Wass, in command 3d Brigade, 2nd Div., 2nd Corps. Major Edmund Rice, in command of regiment. Co. C.Second Lieut. Joseph W. Snellen, promoted from Commissary Sergeant, to date July 16, 1863. Co. E.Capt. John P. Reynolds, Jr., returned Sept. 1, and mustered as captain to date Feb. 27th. Co. F.Capt. Chas. M. Merritt, on detached service, General Martindale's headquarters, Washington. Transferred from Co. G to Co. A, as First Lieutenant on account of non-muster. Mustered as Captain by order Sec'y of War to date Nov. 1, 1861, and transferred from Co. A to Co. F, Sept. 26, 1863. Second Lieut. John J. Ferris, in command Co. F. Co. G.First. Lieut Dudley C. Mumford, in command of company. Asst. Surg. W. D. Knapp, returned to duty Sept. 25, 1863, from hospital. Second Lieut. Charles L. Merrill, transferred to Invalid Corps, S. O. 202,
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
John, priv., (—), Dec. 2, ‘62; 22; N. F.R. Fitz Henry, priv., (H), Dec. 1, 1861; 25; wounded Dec. 13, ‘62; disch. disa. Mar. 10, ‘63 at Washington, D. C. by Gen. Martindale. Fitzgerald, Edward, priv., (G), July 25, ‘61; 23; wounded June 25, ‘62; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Fitzgerald, George, priv., (—), Aug. 5, ‘61; 18; N. F.R. Fitzge64. Gaston, George, priv., (E), Dec. 3, ‘64; 39; disch. June 10, ‘65. Gateley, Thomas, priv., (E), July 25, ‘61; 22; disch. disa. Dec. 26, ‘62 by order of Gen. Martindale. Gatz, George, priv., (C), Jan. 5, ‘65; 35; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Gaynor, Francis, priv., (D), July 24, ‘61; 34; died Feb. 24, ‘63. George, Willard K., priv.Aug. 22, ‘62; transf. to 20th regt.; resigned Mar. 14, ‘63. Tappan, Abraham, priv., (F), Aug. 4, ‘61; 45; disch. disa. Dec. 13, ‘62 at Washington, D. C. by Gen. Martindale. Tappan, Wm. S., priv., (F), Aug. 24, ‘61; 19; M. O. Aug. 28, ‘64 in Co. I. Tareno, Sareno, priv., (H), Dec. 17, ‘6
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 14: from Cold Harbor to Petersburg (search)
ade by some officers to discover who had perpetrated this outrage, as it was called, but without any success. We remained at Bermuda Hundred waiting an order to attack. It was reported on the 18th that General Wright and General Butler had quarreled, but it had no influence upon our movements. On the morning of the 19th we crossed the river and marched to the Petersburg front, to the vicinity of the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad, which position we occupied, relieving some of General Martindale's division of the Eighteenth Corps. At daylight on the 20th firing began on our front, and a battery just to our right kept up a continuous fire. Shortly after sunrise a Rebel picket came into our lines. He had a number of canteens and seemed to be confused and lost, and was greatly surprised when he jumped over the works. During the day of the 20th a Rebel mortar battery opened upon us, and for a little while made it very lively for us. Where we were posted the railroad had been
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