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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 44 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 20 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 17 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 15 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 4 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 10 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Martindale or search for Martindale in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
assault in column against certain selected points instead of a general attack in line, as originally intended. Grant and His Campaigns, p. 352. Meade's Report of Campaign of 1864. At 8 1/2 A. M. Kershaw's division moved into position on right of the Confederate line, and at 9 o'clock General Lee rode upon the field. It was noon before the enemy essayed any vigorous attack, but then began a series of swift and furious assaults, continuing at intervals far into the evening — from Martindale on the right, from Hancock and Burnside in the centre, from Warren on the left; but though their men advanced with spirit, cheering and at the run, and their officers displayed an astonishing hardihood, several of them rushing up to within thirty yards of the adverse works, bearing the colors, yet the huge columns, rent by the plunging fire of the light guns, and smitten with a tempest of bullets, recoiled in confusion, and finally fled, leaving their dead and dying on the field along the