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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
d his wife were sold to a common owner, and returned voluntarily—or at least without resistance—to Missouri, where the husband brought suit for their freedom. The State court denied the suit, in default of evidence that their owners meant to manumit them by taking them on to free soil. Appeal was then made to the Federal Supreme Court, a body of nine members, of whom five were Lib. 27.62. slaveholders. The article in the Westminster [for July, 1857, by Harriet Lib. 27.173, 177, 181. Martineau, on the Manifest Destiny of the American Union], wrote Mrs. M. W. Chapman to Mr. Garrison, was, Ms. Oct. 24 (?), 1857. I find by comparison of dates, written at a time when no two papers in the United States agreed as to what the Dred Scott decision did mean—all the A. S. papers agreeing that if it meant anything, it meant the extension of slavery throughout the States. . . . I should really like to read the decision, with all the different ideas as to what it means—if I had a mont
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Lydia Maria child. (search)
rn society which had been followed by Nat Turner's insurrection; and now a literary lady, amid the cultivated circles of Boston, dared also to appeal. Only two years before (1831) Garrison had begun the Liberator, and only two years later (1835) he was destined to be dragged through Boston streeets, with a rope round his neck, by gentlemen of property and standing, as the newspapers said next day. It was just at the most dangerous moment of the rising storm that Mrs. Child appealed. Miss Martineau in her article, The martyr age in America, --published in the London and Westminster review in 1839, and at once reprinted in America,--gives by far the most graphic picture yet drawn of that perilous time. She describes Mrs. Child as a lady of whom society was exceedingly proud before she published her Appeal, and to whom society has been extremely contemptuous ever since. She adds: Her works were bought with avidity before, but fell into sudden oblivion as soon as she had done a grea
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
On September 23, 1835, her father was attacked by cholera, and died within three days. Great as must have been the blow to the whole family, it was greatest of all to Margaret. The tie between them had been very close, and this sudden death threw the weight of the whole household upon the eldest child. It came at what had seemed to her the golden moment of her whole life; for she was about to visit Europe with her constant friends, Professor and Mrs. Farrar, and with their friend Harriet Martineau, who was just returning home. But all this must be at once abandoned. Mr. Fuller had left barely property enough to support his widow, and to educate the younger children, with the aid of their elder sister. Mrs. Fuller was in delicate health, and of a more yielding nature than Margaret, who became virtually head of the house. Under her strong supervision, two out of the five boys went honorably through Harvard College,--a third having previously graduated,while the young sister wa
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, The woman's rights movement and its champions in the United States. (search)
, June 12th, 1840, the delegates from the Massachusetts and Pennsylvania societies were denied their seats. The delegation consisted of Lucretia Mott, Mary Grew, Abby Kimber, Elizabeth Neale, Sarah Pugh, from Pennsylvania; Emily Winslow, Abby Southwick, and Anne Greene Phillips, from Massachusetts. This sacrifice of human rights, by men who had assembled from all quarters of the globe to proclaim universal emancipation, was offered up in the presence of such women as Lady Noel Byron, Harriet Martineau, Elizabeth Fry, Mary Howitt, and Anna Jamieson. The delegates had been persuasively asked to waive their claims that the harmony of the convention might not he disturbed by a question of such minor importance. But through their champion, Wendell Phillips (who was then a young man, and brave too, I thought, to advocate so unpopular an idea almost alone in such an assembly), they maintained that as they had been delegated by large and influential organizations, they must press their cl
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 1: no union with non-slaveholders!1861. (search)
yed the account of your meeting in the Standard. Garrison is bringing up the rear like a good captain. Our dear chief (as Florence Nightingale calls Sidney Herbert) is one to be proud of. He is so great as a social reformer that, as H. M. [Harriet Martineau] says, in her sketch of him in the Once a Week, he is too great, as such, to be a representative man at present; however, his example may raise up a class hereafter. I wonder why we have never republished that sketch? I dare say Johnson dlong illness, on the 14th of November, in his 73d year. They were held in the same parlors of the old Hollis Street house in which the ladies of the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society met after the mob of 1835, and received a new ally in Harriet Martineau (ante, 2: 52, 57, 60). Like Charles F. Hovey, he left a noble bequest to the cause so dear to them both, and provided a fund which lasted beyond the abolition of slavery and helped to swell the contributions for the education of the freedme
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 3: the Proclamation.—1863. (search)
We have endured the misrepresentations of certain organs of our press too long, and we have now determined to endure them no longer. But always remember that, from the beginning, the best of our journals have remained true to the anti-slavery cause; that the Star, Daily News, The chief proprietor of the Morning Star was Samuel Lucas, a brother-inlaw of John Bright; its editors, Justin McCarthy and F. W. Chesson. The Daily News was edited by Thomas Walker, with the powerful aid of Harriet Martineau, who wrote scores of editorials on the American question. Westminster Review, Spectator, Nonconformist, British Standard, Dial, Birmingham Post, The Birmingham Post published an instructive series of letters on the American question from the pen of Mr. Samuel A. Goddard, an American gentleman long resident in that city, and a brother of Mrs. Mary May. They were subsequently collected in a volume (London, 1870). Manchester Examiner, Newcastle Chronicle, Caledonian Mercury, Belfast W
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
included their emancipation. But in his reply to Prof. Newman there was that largeness of view and recognition of outside difficulties which we call the statesmanlike quality of mind (Ms. May 14, 1887, Geo. Jacob Holyoake to W. P. G.). Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. Ambleside, August 10, 1864. Ms. I have been thinking of you with strong sympathy for a long time past. Indeed, as you know, I always did; but I mean particularly since your precious wife's illness, and since the pecfrailties, for the sake of the national welfare. ... I say as much as circumstances permit in honor of Mr. Lincoln in the Daily News, and I shall try my best to work in that, the best possible direction. Yours, dear friend, affectionately, H. Martineau. Thomas Hughes to W. L. Garrison. 3 old Square, Lincoln's Inn,Ms. London, Sept. 9, 1864. Lib. 34.158. my dear Sir: I cannot resist writing you a line, though you have probably scarcely ever heard my name, to say how right and wise I and
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 7: the National Testimonial.—1866. (search)
ed support, and in the end ensures him a competence. No act of Mr. Garrison's could have afforded more convincing proof of his unselfishness than his voluntary discontinuance of the Liberator, and his joyful recognition of the accomplishment of its immediate object. The Euthanasia of the Liberator was celebrated by Edmund Quincy in the N. Y. Independent of Jan. 11, 1866. Notable articles on the career of the paper and its editor also appeared in the London Daily News of Jan. 9 (by Harriet Martineau), N. Y. Nation (by O. B. Frothingham), and N. Y. Tribune (by H. B. Stanton) of Jan. 4, and in other leading journals. Certainly it was not without a pang of regret that he gave up the paper and its office, the loss of which and of his long-established editorial routine made him feel, as he expressed it, like a hen plucked of her feathers. Old habits he could not at once shake off. Many of his exchanges continued to come to him, and he would read and clip from them as industriously as
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
pon this question about thirty years ago; I allude to Harriet Martineau. (Cheers.) I recollect well the impression with whics cause in America. . . . When I read that article by Harriet Martineau, and the description of W. L. G. Breakfast, p. 20. tfor fully a quarter of a century; in fact, ever since Harriet Martineau introduced your name to the English people. When ourould have been an aggravation to go there and not see Harriet Martineau, whose ill-health rendered it doubtful whether she coand several letters were interchanged by them. Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. The Knoll, Ambleside, June 19, 18ation and affection, I am your old and grateful friend, H. Martineau. Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. Ambleside, JuHarriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. Ambleside, June 25, 1867. Ms. My dear friend: I really cannot resist telling you how happy you have made me by the present of your liks love and peace. I am your affectionate old friend, H. Martineau. During their stay in Glasgow, Mr. Garrison and his ch
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 10: death of Mrs. Garrison.—final visit to England.—1876, 1877. (search)
he Presidential campaign. In Hayes-Tilden. June he received a note from Harriet Martineau, acknowledging the Memorial of Mrs. Garrison, and this was swiftly follow as to which she frequently conferred with him during that autumn. Harriet Martineau to W. L. Garrison. Ambleside, May 30, 1876. Ms. my dear friend: Whenficulty. Accept the sympathy and reverent blessing of your old friend, Harriet Martineau. W. L. Garrison to Maria W. Chapman. Roxbury, Jan. 18, 1877. Ms. he Weymouth Express, to-day, H. M.'s Autobiography and your supplemental Harriet Martineau. volume, hoping I have not put you to any inconvenience by not returning d (Boston) Woman's Journal of Nov. 17, 1877. He also visited the grave of Harriet Martineau, in one of the July 8. Birmingham cemeteries. At Sheffield he paused onwentwater, Windermere, and Ullswater. At Ambleside he visited The Knoll, Harriet Martineau's Aug. 12. late home, and rejoiced to find the house occupied by sympath
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