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Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 4 (search)
o. I was afterwards still more interested in her, by the warm praises of Harriet Martineau, who had become acquainted with her at Cambridge, and who, finding Margarg us together. I remember, during a week in the winter of 1835-6, in which Miss Martineau was my guest, she returned again and again to the topic of Margaret's excelacquaintance; which I willingly promised. I am not sure that it was not in Miss Martineau's company, a little earlier, that I first saw her. And I find a memorandum, in her own journal, of a visit, made by my brother Charles and myself, to Miss Martineau, at Mrs. Farrar's. It was not, however, till the next July, after a little don Falls; and, in the autumn, made the acquaintance, at Mrs. F.'s house, of Miss Martineau, whose friendship, at that moment, was an important stimulus to her mind. ough, after her father died, the disappointment of not going to Europe with Miss Martineau and Mrs. Farrar was extreme, and her mother and sister wished her to take h
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Chapter 8: first years in Boston (search)
olitical efficiency had begun to occupy the attention and divide the feeling of the American public. When, after the close of the civil war, the question was again brought forward, with a new zeal and determination, Mr. Phillips gave it the great support of his eloquence, and continued through a long course of years to be one of its most earnest advocates. The last time that I heard Wendell Phillips speak in public was in December, 1883, at the unveiling of Miss Whitney's statue of Harriet Martineau, in the Old South Meeting-House. Mrs. Livermore was one of the speakers of the occasion. When the stated exercises were at an end, she said to me, Let us thank Mr. Phillips for what he has just said. We shall not have him with us long. I expressed surprise at this, and she said further, He has heart disease, and is far from well. Soon after this followed his death, and the splendid public testimonial given in his honor. I was one of those admitted to the funeral exercises, in whi
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899, Index (search)
g, 339. Marco Bozzaris, 22. Margherita, Queen, at King Umberto's coronation, 424. Mario, sings at Lansdowne House, 101. Marion, Gen., Francis, 4. Martel, a hair-dresser, 65. Martin Chuzzlewit, transcendental episode in, 139. Martineau, Harriet, statue of, 158. May, Abby W., aids bazaar in behalf of the Cretans, 320; her energy in the Association for the Advancement of Women, 393. May, Rev. Samuel J., 394. McAllister, Julian, marries Louisa Cutler, 33. McAllister, Mrs. on the annexation of Santo Domingo, 181, 345. White, Mrs. Andrew D., 346. White, Charlotte, a character in early New York, 77. Whiting, Solomon, attends Mrs. Howe's lecture in Washington, 309. Whitney, Miss, Anne, her statue of Harriet Martineau, 158. Whittier, John G., praises Passion Flowers, 228; his characterization of Dr. Howe, 370. Wieck, the German composer, described by Mrs. Jameson, 40. Wilbour, Mrs. Charlotte B., prominent in the woman's congress, 385, 386. Wi
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 16., Distinguished guests and residents of Medford. (search)
ultural Society. The writer remembers his dignified manner as she sat opposite him at a banquet of the society. Harriet Martineau, the English writer, came to this country in 1835, remaining two years. She was a guest in the home of Rev. Caleb or low lying Pasture Hill above, there must have been much pleasant conversation on subjects of common interest, for Miss Martineau's brother was a celebrated Unitarian divine. A relative of the Stetsons says, There floats in my mind a dim tradition of Miss Lucy Osgood having made a tea party for Miss Martineau at that time, borrowing my aunt's guest knives and forks, as extras were needed, but not inviting her. I doubt if any ladies were present but the two sisters and Miss Martineau; they Miss Martineau; they found manly-scholarly conversation much more to their liking than the usual feminine-domestic. Yet no one relished a spicy bit of gossip, not unfriendly, more than they, but it must be the spice, not the substance, of life. John Quincy Adams visi
Harriet Martineau and the Tariff. --Harriet Martineau thus writes to the National Abolition Standard, of the Morrill tariff: "Since I wrote my last, the general feeling in England and, I believe, in most others, has gone round — if not in favor of the South, at least far away from the North." She argues and explains thiHarriet Martineau thus writes to the National Abolition Standard, of the Morrill tariff: "Since I wrote my last, the general feeling in England and, I believe, in most others, has gone round — if not in favor of the South, at least far away from the North." She argues and explains this at length, but we have no room at present for her letter. This testimony from Harriet Martineau is strong and decisive, and is confirmed by all authentic reports that have reached us. nd and, I believe, in most others, has gone round — if not in favor of the South, at least far away from the North." She argues and explains this at length, but we have no room at present for her letter. This testimony from Harriet Martineau is strong and decisive, and is confirmed by all authentic reports that have reached
t he had said without directly accusing Lord Melbourne of falsehood. "My noble friend, " he remarked, "though but a novice "in office, made the denial with a glibness and "readiness that might have done honor to the "moderate habits of official assertion, only acquired by those who are born at Whitehall "and bred in Downing street." The element of unexpectedness in though and statement has been regarded a considerable charm of invective. It has been observed that the best criticism on Harriet Martineau's atheistical book is the remark of a London wit, who was asked what was the doctrine which it inculcated. He replied: "The doctrine seems to be this: there is no God, and Harriet is his prophet." The following example is given of a peculiar kind of invective by epigram, which springs directly from personal character. Sidney Smith once justified an assault on a man of moderate abilities, whose purposes he considered as mischievous as they were well meant. "I do not attack him,
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