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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
matic, dry, infinitely to the point, full of wisdom, of sarcasm, and cold humor. He says the most ill-natured things, and does the best. He came up to me at Miss Martineau's, where there was a little party of very clever people, and said: Mr. Sumner, it is a great piece of benevolence in you to come here. Determined not to be d of Mr. Montagu to Talfourd as a person whom I liked very much, when the author of on said: He is a humbug; he drinks no wine. Commend me to such humbugs! Miss Martineau 1802-76. Sumner visited Miss Martineau at Ambleside in 1857. She became quite impatient in later life with him and with all who maintained, as he did, theMiss Martineau at Ambleside in 1857. She became quite impatient in later life with him and with all who maintained, as he did, the liability of England for the escape of the rebel cruisers in our civil war,—a liability which was found to exist by the award at Geneva. I see pretty often. She has been consistently kind to me; and though circumstances have made me somewhat independent of her civilities, yet I feel grateful to her, and am glad to confess that I
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, March 1, 1839. (search)
s concluded a contract with a bookseller for his history of England. If this is so, farewell politics,— for a while at least. He is said to have all the history in his mind, for fifty or sixty years following the Revolution, so as to be able to write without referring to a book. Lord Brougham is revising his characters in the Edinburgh Review for publication in a volume. Sketches of Statesmen of the Time of George the Third. The booksellers have offered him five hundred guineas! Miss Martineau's novel of Deerbrook will be published in a few days. I have already, I believe, borne my testimony to her; I think she has been wronged in America. I have mingled in her society much, and have been happy to find her the uniform and consistent friend of our country, and much attached to many of its inhabitants. I am also glad to confess my obligations to her for much kindness. I have always found her heartily friendly. I should like to write you about Parliamentary orators, all of w
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
enate. Mrs. Eames (nee Campbell), living in Washington most of the time while Sumner was in the Senate, died in 1890. He found also solace and good cheer in the congenial fellowship of men and women, distinguished for antislavery activities or sympathies, who gathered almost daily in the home of Dr. Bailey of the National Era. Hardly a foreigner of distinction ever came to Washington while Sumner was in the Senate without seeking him. At this session Jacob Bright came, commended by Harriet Martineau; Arthur h. Clough, by John Kenyon; Dr. Charles Eddy, fellow of Oxford, by Macready; but it was not till the next session that he welcomed Thackeray. Among old English friends who visited Washington in 1852 were Lord and Lady Wharncliffe, John Stuart Wortley, the second Lord Wharncliffe. accompanied by their daughter, since Lady Henry Scott. Lord Wharncliffe, after his return home in the spring of 1852, wrote Sumner long and friendly letters; and though highly conservative, was symp
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
orth at Holwood. He dined twice with Mr. Parkes at the Reform Club, but his friends were mostly absent from London. He then went north to attend the exhibition at Manchester, and to fulfil engagements for visits at Mr. Ashworth's at Bolton, Miss Martineau's at Ambleside, and Mr. Ingham's at South Shields. From Edinburgh he penetrated into the highlands of Scotland as far as Fort Augustus, in order to visit an old acquaintance, Edward Ellice, Sr., at Glenquoich. From this northern point he wr9. Again all day at the Exhibition. In the evening went to Ellenbeck, the seat of Mr. Cardwell, where I dined and passed the night. September 30. Stopped an hour at Preston; also an hour at Kendal; saw these towns; went on to Ambleside to Miss Martineau's, where I passed the night. October 1. Left Ambleside early; stopped at Brougham Hall for a couple of hours; resisted pressing invitation to stay to dinner and all night; went on to Carlisle. October 2. Drove out to Scaleby Hall (seven
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
Printed in Memoires de l'academie des Sciences Morales et Politiques, vol. XI. p. 33. at the Institute, receiving a complimentary ticket from Mignet, the lecturer. Tender messages came across the channel from the Wharncliffes, Roebuck, Harriet Martineau, Parkes, Senior, the Duchess of Argyll, and Ingham,—all sympathetic in his suffering, and urging visits as soon as his progress to health admitted. He went some days to the galleries of the Louvre; but his best resource during the few hou the same occasion to make my first acquaintance with your friend Mr. Forster, for whose roof, I believe, you left Mine, or vice versa, when you were last in England. I was much struck with his straightforward grasp of mind. I went to see Harriet Martineau in the autumn, chiefly because you told me to do so. . . . In only one respect have I to find fault with your letter, and that must be very gravely,— you do not vouchsafe one syllable about the state of your own health, which is what above
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
not thinking it a bit too strong. The duchess reported Tennyson as warmly approving it, and saying, I thought the most eloquent thing in the speech was the unspoken thing,—the silence about his own story. Punch gave it a hearty assent, and Miss Martineau in public letters expressed her cordial sympathy with its scope and spirit. Miss Martineau's letters appeared in the New York Antislavery Standard. As the agitation went on in the summer and autumn,—the profoundest and most universal iMiss Martineau's letters appeared in the New York Antislavery Standard. As the agitation went on in the summer and autumn,—the profoundest and most universal in our history,—the people of the free States, it was found, were feeling and thinking as Sumner thought and felt; and the discussion broadened beyond the precise point in issue,—the extension of slavery into the Territories,—and embraced the character and history of slavery and the supremacy of the slave-power in the national government. It came to pass that Sumner's speech was read beyond that of any other statesman; and the call for his voice in different States was most urgent, even fro
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ork of William T. Harris, was even more potent in Great Britain. In 1835 De Tocqueville reported that in no part of the civilized world was less attention paid to philosophy than in the United States. One gets the same impression from Harriet Martineau's Society in America and from the account of Philarete Chasles. Whether because of absorption in the material conquest of a vast continent, or because of a narrow orthodoxy which was then hindering free intellectual life in England as well were interested. During this period America was peculiarly conscious of its growth in national independence and sensitive as to its provincialism. This sensitiveness was not rendered less acute by the comments of friendly visitors such as Miss Martineau (Society in America, 1837) and Charles Dickens (American notes, 1842), guests not inclined to see Americans first. Some of these foreign commentators on educational America were more generous in appreciation. George Combe, the celebrated ph
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
nghorne Marlowe, Christopher, 126 Marlowe, Julia, 279, 283 Marlowe, 291 Marquis, Don, 22 Marriage of Guenevere, the, 51 Marsh, George Perkins, 473 Marsh, James, 228 Marshall (Discoverer of Gold in California), 145 Marshall (English playwright), 279 Marshall John, 253 Marshall W. I., 137 Marshall's Own Account of the Gold Discovery, 145 Martin, Edward S., 22 Martin, E. W., 356 Martin, G. M., 420 Martin, Helen R., 585 Martin, W. A. P., 155 Martineau, Harriet, 228 n., 406 Martin Eden, 94 Martini, 450 Martyr, Justin, 466 Martyr Book, 536 Marvellous country, the, 132 Marvin, W. T., 264 Maryland, 497 Marzio's Crucifix, 88 Mason, Lowell, 495, 499, 500 Mason, Walt, 498 Masque of judgment, the, 63 Masquerier, L., 438 Massachusetts, its historians and history, 198 Massacre of Cheyenne Indians, 148 Masses, 333 Masters, Edgar Lee, 65, 76, 615 Mater, 277 Mather, Cotton, 73, 389, 390, 392, 444 Mather, Ric
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
No one has a title to witness with purer joy the successful close of your great contest; for from the first you proclaimed the cause of the abolition of slavery — the cause of your noble exertions throughout your life—as your object in the war, and the sole reward to be looked to. William E. Forster wrote, Nov. 22, 1861, heartily in our favor, approving Sumner's recent speech at Worcester, and expressing the hope that our government would soon hoist the standard of emancipation. Harriet Martineau complained, Nov. 18, 1862, that American opinion treated England unfairly as compared with France, as the former country had resisted the latter's pressure for breaking the blockade and for intervention. Martin F. Tupper, though of positive antislavery convictions, wrote, Nov. 9, 1862, that it would be better to let the South go than to attempt a forced union. Earl de Grey (later Marquis of Ripon), who succeeded G. C. Lewis as Secretary of War, answered, June 14, 1863, Sumner's note
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 3 (search)
shall feel greater confidence in them. Miss Martineau. In the summer of 1835, Margaret found stimulus to self-culture in the society of Miss Martineau, whom she met while on a visit at Cambridgwas to her, appears from her journals. Miss Martineau received me so kindly as to banish all embprehend myself. I have had some hope that Miss Martineau might be this friend, but cannot yet tell.o my defects. A delightful letter from Miss Martineau. I mused long upon the noble courage withinvited her to be their companion; and, as Miss Martineau was to return to England in the ship with the time, laid aside De Stael and Bacon, for Martineau and Southey. I find, with delight, that the Magnanimity. Immediately after reading Miss Martineau's book on America, Margaret felt bound in e of light streams from his torch. When Harriet Martineau writes about America, I often cannot tesr side of the Atlantic, by their censor, Harriet Martineau. I do not like that your book should [1 more...]
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