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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House 2 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Marylander or search for Marylander in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
t her, to push on — only one regiment in the town, and that might be completely surprised; if we pressed on we might get the whole. This young lady was the afterward notorious rebel spy, Belle Boyd, who was to my eye, recorded the adjutant, pleasant and lady-like in appearance, and certainly had neither freckled face, red hair and large mouth, as the New York Herald said she had. She seemed embarrassed by the novelty of her position, and very anxious that we should push on. That gallant Marylander See page 553, volume I. made a spirited resistance against the overwhelming force, ten times his own in Fac-Simile of Jackson's note to Ewell. this is an exact fac-simile of Jackson's entire note to Ewell, with all its blots, carefully copied from the original, kindly placed in the hands of the author by the late Frank Henry number, but he was driven from the town. He made a stand on a ridge a mile distant, from which he was soon pushed across the river. He attempted to burn the