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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 70 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 66 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 52 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 52 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 26 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for James M. Mason or search for James M. Mason in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 3 document sections:

Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
erritory ceded should be held for the common benefit of the Union, and formed into republican States. The response of Virginia was prompt. In fact, Virginia had informally invited this action of Congress, as may be seen from the letter of Colonel Mason, author of the Remonstrance, written from the Virginia Assembly, July 27, 1780, to Mr. Joseph Jones, in Congress. (Life of Patrick Henry, by W. W. Henry, vol. 2, p. 85.) In this letter, Colonel Mason says that the members of the legislature Colonel Mason says that the members of the legislature wish for such reasonable propositions from Congress as they can unite in supporting. Her general assembly entered promptly upon the discussion of the proposed cession of the western lands. After debating its provisions through the Christmas holidays, the legislative forms of the act were completed January 2, 1781, by which Virginia tendered to the United States the most magnificent Christmas gift which history records, resigned the sovereignty of the largest tract of territory in the annals
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
in those States, thoroughly Union, and led by Mason, Toombs, Stephens, Cobb, Jefferson Davis and tive leaders as Mr. Crittenden, Mr. Stephens, Mr. Mason and Mr. Jefferson Davis. Referring to the ens in Congress were not peace preservative. Mr. Mason expressed his pride in the honorable office by the convention, and there I shall stand. Mr. Mason declared that his State would deeply deploreward two other embassadors were appointed, James M. Mason and John Slidell, and eventually distributamong the foreign courts was made by sending Mr. Mason to England, Mr. Slidell to France, Mr. Yost often discharged positions of public trust. Mr. Mason had become an experienced legislator in the erate President appointed John Slidell and James M. Mason diplomatic agents in October, 1861, with psaying that he would search the vessel to find Mason and Slidell. But while the English captain wa shrewd suggestion that in the capture of Messrs. Mason and Slidell on board a British vessel, Cap
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, until the close of the war. He then retired to a farm in Virginia, removed thence to Pennsylvania in 1876, and died at Penllyn, July 13, 1881. Lieutenant-General Richard Stoddart Ewell Lieutenant-General Richard Stoddart Ewell was born at Georgetown, D. C., February 8, 1817. He was graduated at West Point in 1840, and with promotion to a lieutenancy of dragoons served on the frontier until 1846. He went into the Mexican war as first-lieutenant of Mason's Dragoons, participated in the fighting from Vera Cruz to Chapultepec and received the brevet of captain for gallantry at Contreras and Churubusco. In 1849 he was promoted to captain, and continued in the United States service, on duty in New Mexico, until the spring of 1861, when he resigned his commission in order to tender his sword to Virginia. With the rank of lieutenant-colonel, corps of cavalry, he commanded the camp of instruction at Ashland, and was promoted brigadiergen-eral Ju