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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Cruise of the Nashville. (search)
The Cruise of the Nashville. By Judge Theodore S. Garnett, Jr. [from facts furnished by Lieutenant W. C. Whittle.] In 1861 the Nashville, then used as a freight and passenger steamer, was seized in the port of Charleston, S. C., by the Confederate authorities and soon fitted out for the purpose of taking Messrs. Mason and Slidell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brig-rigged steamer, of about one thousand two hundred or one thousand four hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; Charles M. Fauntleroy, First Lieutenant; John W. Bennett, Second Lieutenant; William C. Whittle, Third Lieutenant; John H. Ingram, Master; Jno. L. Ancrum, Surgeon; Richard Taylor, Paymaster; James Hood,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
Old, Fourth Virginia, and Irving, First Virginia, all of Munford's old brigade; Captain Henry Lee, A. A. G.; Lieutenant Abram Warwick, A. D. C.; Lieutenant Mortimer Rogers, Ordnance Officer; and Sergeant-Major L. Griffin, Second Virginia cavalry. I cannot close this, my last official report, without commending for their valuable services the following officers of my staff not previously mentioned, and who at the last moment were found doing their duty on the fated field of Appomattox: Majors Mason and Treaner, Assistant Adjutant and Inspector-Generals; Major W. B. Warwick, Chief Commissary; Dr. A. C. Randolph, Chief Surgeon; Major Breathed, Chief of Artillery; Major G. M. Ryalls, formerly of General Stuart's staff; and Captain Lewellyn Saunderson, who, having just arrived from his native country, Ireland, joined me previous to the fall of Petersburg, and remained with me to the last. The proverbial intrepidity of the dashing Mason and reckless Breathed upon every battle-field of t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division army of Northern Virginia Association (search)
rnside's two corps; and during the 13th the cavalry made two separate stands against the Federal infantry in Middletown Valley, for the purpose of saving time and retarding the advance. By noon of the 13th, however, Burnside had obtained possesssion of the top of the mountain at Hagans. From that point is a most extensive and lovely view. Middletown Valley, rich in orchards, farm houses, barns, and flocks and herds spread before you, down to the Potomac and Virginia on the left, and up to Mason and Dixon's line and Pennsylvania on the right. The South Mountain, or Blue Ridge, stretches out, a wall of green on the western side of this Elysian scene, while Catoctin forms its eastern bounds. From Hagans the gap at Harpers Ferry is plainly visible. With a good glass you can see through it to the line and hills beyond. On the Maryland Heights was a high tower, erected for a signal station, and flags on it, and at Hagans it could have been readily distinguished. They were not eighte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Orations at the unveiling of the statue of Stonewall Jackson, Richmond, Va., October 26th, 1875. (search)
them in the writings of the essayists and historians of the mother-country. We honor ourselves and do homage to virtue, when we hallow the names of those who in the council and in the field achieved such victories. We bequeath an influence which will bless coming generations, when with the brush and the chisel we perpetuate the images of our fathers and the founders of the State. Already has the noble office been begun. Here on this hill the forms of Washington, and Henry, and Lewis, and Mason, and Nelson, and Jefferson, and Marshall, arrest our eyes and make their silent but salutary and stirring appeals to our hearts. Nor are these all who merit eternal commemoration. As I look on that monument, I miss James Madison and others of venerable and illustrious name. Let us not cease our patriotic work until we have reared a Pantheon worthy of the undying glory of the past. But this day we inaugurate a new era. We lay the corner-stone of a new Pantheon in commemoration of our co
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
f the Baltimore Delegation in the legislature, which was in Frederick, in session. On May 7, 1861, she went to Chestnut Hill, Va., the residence of a friend, Mrs. Mason, and the next day her husband followed her with his company—the Frederick Volunteers—to Point of Rocks. There, in a few days, he was joined by a company from Beons of the regiment, she tended the sick that whole summer, and without doubt saved some lives. When Beauregard moved to the Potomac, and occupied the lines of Mason's and Munson's Hills, within sight of the Capitol at Washington, she and her escort, her little boy, were frequent visitors to the picket line, and he attracted th as a freight and passenger steamer, was seized in the port of Charleston, S. C., by the Confederate authorities, and soon fitted out for the purpose of taking Messrs. Mason and Slidell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brigrigged steamer, of about twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
Cruise of the C. S. Steamer Nashville. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, March 18, 1901.1 By Lieutenant W. C. Whittle, C. S. N. In 1861 the Nashville, then used as a freight and passenger steamer, was seized in the port of Charleston, S. C., by the Confederate authorities, and soon fitted out for the purpose of taking Messrs. Mason and Slidell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brigrigged steamer, of about twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood;
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
rince Polignac was sent to Paris to swap off Louisiana for intervention by Louis Napoleon, and to supersede Slidell, while another writer tells us how Mr. Duncan F. Kenner, of Louisiana, was dispatched with authority to supersede both Slidell and Mason. Perhaps this is the proper place to say that the secrets of the Confederate Government were well kept. I have heard a statement to the effect that the United States Government was regularly kept advised of the military strength and movements ody in 1861 without a personal enemy and with the sincere respect and esteem of all its members of either party. His mind was thoughtful, sagacious, well balanced, and pre-eminently conservative. His elaborate instructions to Messrs. Slidell and Mason, who were commissioned to London and Paris in September, 1865, embody the general policy of the Confederate State Department which was pursued to the close. Like Mr. Toombs, he was careless as to personal appearanee, but he was far more studious
Historic leaves, volume 7, April, 1908 - January, 1909, Report of the Committee on Necrology of the Somerville Historical Society. (search)
Library, on which he served five years, and was especially active in securing for the Library its fine collection of German works. Mr. Sawyer read German with pleasure, having traveled in Germany and other parts of Europe. He was a well-known Mason, a member of the Henry Price Lodge of Charlestown, one of the founders of Soley Lodge, and a Royal Arch Mason and Knight Templar. He aided in forming the Coeur de Lion Commandery of Charlestown, and for two years served as commander. Mr. SawyerMason and Knight Templar. He aided in forming the Coeur de Lion Commandery of Charlestown, and for two years served as commander. Mr. Sawyer was for nearly half a century president of the 999th Artillery Association of Charlestown. He was also an Odd Fellow, a member of the Manomet Club, and president for two years of the Training Field School Association in Charlestown. He married Julia A. Heal, of Belmont, Me., who died in 1894. One son survives his parents, Dr. Edward K. Sawyer, born in 1868. L. Frank Arnold was born in Somerville September 4, 1845, son of Leonard and Irene G. (Clark) Arnold. He lived in Somerville all his
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Sketches and tributes (search)
complied. With his letter came one from Governor Wise, in courteous reproval of her sympathy for John Brown. To this she responded in an able and effective manner. Her reply found its way from Virginia to the New York Tribune, and soon after Mrs. Mason, of King George's County, wife of Senator Mason, the author of the infamous Fugitive Slave Law, wrote her a vehement letter, commencing with threats of future damnation, and ending with assuring her that no Southerner, after reading her letterSenator Mason, the author of the infamous Fugitive Slave Law, wrote her a vehement letter, commencing with threats of future damnation, and ending with assuring her that no Southerner, after reading her letter to Governor Wise, ought to read a line of her composition, or touch a magazine which bore her name in its list of contributors. To this she wrote a calm, dignified reply, declining to dwell on the fierce invectives of her assailant, and wishing her well here and hereafter. She would not debate the specific merits or demerits of a man whose body was in charge of the courts, and whose reputation was sure to be in charge of posterity. Men, she continues, are of small consequence in comparison
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
ined to oppose most energetically. It was because it hoped to see the latter thus drawn into an European war that the Confederate government insisted with so much pertinacity on being recognized, and it had deputed two prominent politicians, Messrs. Mason and Slidell, to go and plead its cause in London and Paris in the capacity of envoys extraordinary. These two agents left Charleston by the steamer Theodora, and reached Havana after eluding the vigilance of the Federal cruisers. On the 7th the commissioners themselves came forward, protesting in their turn against the act of violence with which they were threatened. The reinforcements called for by Fairfax had come aboard and been drawn up amidships with fixed bayonets, while Messrs. Mason and Slidell retired to their respective cabins, declaring that they would not come out unless compelled by force. Fairfax went to bring them out, and with the aid of a few armed men took them by the shoulders, as if intending to carry them a
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