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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 2 Browse Search
John Beatty, The Citizen-Soldier; or, Memoirs of a Volunteer 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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This sergeant is without a haversack; he depends on you for food; don't give him a bite; let him starve. The General appears to be well pleased with his fortifications, and asked me if I did not think it looked like remaining. I replied that the works were strong, and a small force could hold them, and that I should be well pleased if the enemy would attack us here, instead of compelling us to go further south. Yes, said he, I wish they would. General Lytle is to be assigned to Stanley Matthews' brigade. The latter was recently elected judge, and will resign and return to Cincinnati. The anti-Copperhead resolution business of the army must be pretty well exhausted. All the resolutions and letters on this subject that may appear hereafter may be accepted as bids for office. They havehowever, done a great deal of good, and I trust the public will not be forced to swallow an overdose. I had a faint inclination, at one time, to follow the example of my brother officers, a
ate number. We reached the Grant home about eight o'clock, or a little after. Mr. Colfax, his distinguished mother, Mrs. Matthews, and his half-sister, Miss Matthews, arrived soon after, followed by Mr. E. B. Washburn, Mr. Halsey, of New Jersey, aMiss Matthews, arrived soon after, followed by Mr. E. B. Washburn, Mr. Halsey, of New Jersey, and General Grant's staff-Generals Rawlins, Babcock, Dent, Badeau, and Colonel Comstock. After exchanging greetings and pleasantries, General Grant was informed that the committee had arrived. He and Mr. Colfax moved to the rear of the parlor, and stood side by side while the committee was presented. Mrs. Grant and her venerable father, Mr. Dent, and Mrs. and Miss Matthews were not far from them. After the presentation, Governor Hawley, with all the power of his eloquence in his palmy damerican affairs. In the reserved galleries were Mrs. Grant, Mrs. Dent, Mrs. Sharp, members of General Grant's staff, Mrs. Matthews, Schuyler Colfax's mother, and his sister, wives and ladies of the Supreme Court, senators and members, and also many
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 10: (search)
s, presented an imposing appearance, while the galleries were filled to their utmost capacity. Mrs. Grant, her children, and father Colonel Dent, and Mrs. and Miss Matthews, mother and sister of Mr. Colfax, occupied front seats in the reserved galleries. The diplomatic gallery and that reserved for ladies looked brilliant with thg defended the administration or some officer who was in command of a military post in the South. Mrs. Grant was ably supported on all social occasions by Mrs. Matthews and Mrs. Colfax, the mother and the wife of Vice-President Colfax. Both Mrs. Matthews and Mrs. Colfax were charming, graceful women who appreciated their posiMrs. Matthews and Mrs. Colfax were charming, graceful women who appreciated their position and the obligation they owed to the people who had elevated Mr. Colfax to the second highest position within their gift. They realized that, should anything happen to President Grant, Mr. Colfax, by provision of the Constitution, would slip into the very highest position in the land. They were untiring in their efforts to be
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 14: (search)
ted herself to everything which tended to advance the interests of her husband. She had absolute faith in his destiny, and unbounded confidence in his ability to climb to the topmost rung of the ladder of fortune and fame. He had begun the ascent when the nation was startled by a call to arms of her loyal sons. Rutherford B. Hayes could not turn a deaf ear to that call. He helped to raise the 23d Ohio Volunteer Infantry, of which General Rosecrans was colonel, and the late Associate Justice Stanley Matthews, was lieutenant-colonel, going himself as major of that regiment. During the trying years of the varying fortunes of the Army of the Potomac, in which the 23d served, Mrs. Hayes was a frequent visitor to her husband in the field. At South Mountain Major Hayes was badly wounded. Mrs. Hayes appeared soon afterward to nurse him and many others back to health. When in camp, and it was possible to leave her husband, she spent her time in ministering to the Union and Confederate
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
Middle Tennessee would be placed under his orders. The general dispositions included a few regiments for the immediate protection of Nashville, under the command of General Ebenezer Dumont, who besides was charged with the communications of the army, in certain respects. A regiment was also designated as a provost-guard for Nashville, with orders to answer the demands of the military governor, Andrew Johnson, for the enforcement of his authority. The fine regiment (51st Ohio) of Colonel Stanley Matthews, now a justice of the United States Supreme Court, was selected for that position, on account of the efficient and judicious character of its commander. Governor Johnson was not pleased with the limited power thus arranged for himself. He wanted a much larger force under his control, and the records exhibit earnest protests from him to the President and Secretary of War against the defenseless condition in which he considered that I had left him. Under the instructions given to
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Perryville, Ky., October 8th, 1862. (search)
Brig.-Gen. Horatio P. Van Cleve. Eleventh Brigade, Col. Samuel Beatty: 79th Ind., Col. Frederick Knefler; 9th Ky., Lieut.-Col. George H. Cram; 13th Ky., Lieut.-Col. J. B. Carlile; 19th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. E. W. Hollinsworth; 59th Ohio, Col. James P. Fyffe. Fourteenth Brigade, Col. Pierce B. Hawkins: 44th Ind., Col. Hugh B. Reed; 86th Ind., Col. Orville S. Hamilton; 11th Ky., Lieut.-Col. S. P. Love; 26th Ky., Col. Cicero Maxwell; 13th Ohio, Col. Joseph G. Hawkins. Twentythird Brigade, Col. Stanley Matthews: 35th Ind., Col. Bernard F. Mullen; 8th Ky., Col. Sidney M. Barnes; 21st Ky., Col. S. Woodson Price; 51st Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Richard W. McClain; 99th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. John E. Cummins. Artillery: 7th Ind., Capt. George R. Swallow; B, Pa., Lieut. Alanson J. Stevens; 3d Wis., Capt. Lucius H. Drury. Sixth division, Brig.-Gen. Thomas J. Wood. Fifteenth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Milo S. Hascall: 100th Ill., Co]. Frederick A. Bartleson; 17th Ind., Lieut.-Col. George W. Gorman; 58th Ind., Col.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Cavalry operations in the West under Rosecrans and Sherman. (search)
shville, a number of cavalry regiments were being recruited in Kentucky, and that State became a general camp of instruction for new regiments on their way to the front from other States. They were not able, however, to protect the country from the raids of the Confederate cavalry. On the 7th of December, 1862, John H. Morgan attacked the Federals at Hartsville, Tennessee, and captured the garrison. On the 9th General Joseph Wheeler attacked unsuccessfully a Federal brigade under Colonel Stanley Matthews, on the road leading to Murfreesboro‘. A little later in December Morgan moved into Kentucky and destroyed bridges on the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. The Federal cavalry was not in condition at this time to operate successfully against these efforts of the Confederates. In the same month of December, 1862, a bold movement was made by a force of Federal cavalry under General S. P. Carter, composed of three regiments — the 9th Pennsylvania, 2d Michigan, and 8th Ohio. Carte
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
building and in it Governor Harris was living, it is said, in a very frugal manner, when he was summoned to fly from Nashville. He expressed a belief that the hearts of a greater portion of the people of that State would be rejoiced by the fact; Capitol at Nashville. and he assured the inhabitants that the rights of person and property should be respected. On the following day, General Grant and staff arrived, and he and General Buell held a consultation about future movements. Colonel Stanley Matthews, of the Fifty-first Ohio Volunteers, was appointed Provost-Marshal, and order was speedily restored. Railroad connection with Louisville was soon opened, and the inhabitants were invited to resume their avocations. The capture of Nashville, the flight of the Governor and Legislature of Tennessee from the State capital, and the virtual dissolution of civil government in that Commonwealth, imposed upon the National authorities the duty of providing a substitute for the people. It
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
862. by a dash of Wheeler, with a heavy force of cavalry and mounted infantry, upon a National brigade Fifty-first Ohio, Thirty-fifth Indiana, Eighth and Twenty-first Kentucky, and a section of Swallow's Seventh Indiana battery. under Colonel Stanley Matthews, guarding a forage train at Dobbins's Ferry, on Mill Creek. After a short fight Wheeler was repulsed, and Matthews took his train to camp unharmed. Three days after this, General Stanley allowed his men to try the efficacy of two thousMatthews took his train to camp unharmed. Three days after this, General Stanley allowed his men to try the efficacy of two thousand revolving rifles, which he had just received. They pushed down the road toward Franklin, drove the Confederate vedettes from that village, Dec. 12. obtained some important information, and returned with a few prisoners. Such were a few of the minor operations of the Army of the Cumberland, while its commander was preparing for more important movements. The hour for those movements had now arrived. On Christmas eve he had in store at Nashville thirty days provisions and supplies. Brag
rs in stores was lost through the acts of the cowardly and ravenous mob of Nashville. Gen. Floyd and Col. Forrest exhibited extraordinary energy and efficiency in getting off Government stores. Col. Forrest remained in the city about 24 hours, with only 40 men, after the arrival of the enemy at Edgefield. the positive Union gain was inconsiderable. Gen. Buell soon afterward reached Nashville, and established there his headquarters, while his army was quartered around the city. Col. Stanley Matthews, 51st Ohio, was appointed Provost-Marshal, and soon restored the city to order; discovering and reclaiming a considerable amount of Rebel stores which had been appropriated to private use. The bridges and roads northward were speedily repaired, and railroad connection with Louisville reopened. The wealthier classes had in great part left, or remained sullenly disloyal; but among the mechanics and laboring poor a good degree of Union feeling was soon developed. By the Union succe
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