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Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Literary men and women of Somerville. (search)
Literary men and women of Somerville. By David Lee Maulsby. The following persons have rendered valuable help to the writer in the preparation of this paper: Mrs. John F. Ayer, Mr. Edwin M. Bacon, Miss Mary Bacon, Mr. Charles D. Elliot, Mr. Sam Walter Foss, Mrs. Mae D. Frazar, Mrs. Barbara Galpin, Mr. J. O. Hayden, Mrs. George T. Knight, Rev. W. H. Pierson, Mr. L. B. Pillsbury, Mrs. Lucy B. Ransom, Rev. Anson Titus, Miss Anna P. Vinal. after accepting the invitation of the Somerville Historical Society to address it upon the men and women of this city who have been writers, I found it necessary to draw some lines of limitation about the subject. To treat, even inadequately, all of our fellow-citizens that have issued their thoughts in print would be a greater undertaking than a single hour could see completed. It has seemed wise, therefore, to mark a boundary of demarcation between the dead and the living, and to confine this paper to those Somerville authors that are no lon
Literary men and women of Somerville. (Continued.) By David Lee Maulsby. associated with Mrs. Bacon in the editorship of the Ladies' Repository was Nancy Thorning Munroe, who had indeed begun to contribute to its pages at the age of sixteen. She served as one of the two assistant editors during the term of her sister-in-law's leadership. Mrs. Munroe also contributed to the Rose of Sharon. One of her contributions (1856) has peculiar local interest, since it relates to the people who lived on Prospect Hill near her residence. The yellow house with high steps on Walnut street, fronting Aldersey—a house built by her husband—is where Mrs. Munroe lived for many years. In Our Model Neighborhood, after discussing what makes good and bad neighbors, the author says of her own environment: And now, when I would fain describe it, my heart begins to falter. It is not large, though not from any spirit of exclusiveness, be it understood. It is peculiar in many things, and one is this:
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Literary men and women of Somerville. (search)
Literary men and women of Somerville. By David Lee Maulsby. [concluded.] Three persons remain to be briefly considered. Mrs. Mary A. Pillsbury, the daughter of Edwin Leathe, and connected by blood with the Weston family of Reading and the Brooks family of Medford, was born in Lynnfield in 1838. She was married in 1863 to L. B. Pillsbury. Of the four children, Harry N. Pillsbury, it is safe to say, is known as a chess player throughout America and Europe. Mrs. Pillsbury early began to write poems, ‘for her own amusement and for the gratification of her friends.’ In 1888, shortly before her death, a volume of her pieces was published, called ‘The Legend of the Old Mill, and Other Poems.’ The title poem is a story of Mallet's old wind-mill, still looking down upon us from the Nathan Tufts Park, perhaps the most venerable landmark of our city. An Acadian maiden, fleeing from one who would have tarnished her honorable name, takes refuge, disguised as a man, in the old mill