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The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1862., [Electronic resource], Affairs on the Rappahannock — depredations of the enemy — the approaching conflict. (search)
On a recent occasion the Yankees rode up to Mr. Bowler's house, in Madison, and demanded his two sons, who were known to belong to a Confederate regiment, and then at home on furlough; but they kept out of the way, and after several narrow escapes, succeeded in reaching Richmond on Wednesday last. One of these, Mr. B. F. Bowler, informs us that the Federals are scouring the country for the purpose of catching those who have volunteered or have substitutes in our army; that they discovered a Mr. May, who was at home, sick, and unable to leave his bed, and took his name, proposing to arrest him hereafter. The young men are, therefore, leaving the neighborhood by every opportunity. A painful incident occurred at Madison Court House a few days ago, which should be prominently remembered among the atrocities of the war.--A party of Yankees visited the residence of Gen. Banks, in his absence, and proceeded to demolish his furniture and table ware. Mrs. Banks endeavored to resist the
The Daily Dispatch: September 9, 1862., [Electronic resource], Our army in Maryland--particulars of the passage of the Potomac. (search)
aged, and the Yankees some 80,000, but with the usual result. We whipped them badly. Our brigade suffered severely. Gen. Mahone was wounded early in the action; Col Weisiger was badly, and, I expect, mortally wounded a short time afterwards; Major May killed; Adjutant Cameron, Capt. Lewellen, Captain Marks, Capt. Owens, and Lieut. May, wounded.--The casualties in the regiment, which numbered in the fight about 220, were 7 --a pretty large percentage. George Nicholas and Marx Myers were killLieut. May, wounded.--The casualties in the regiment, which numbered in the fight about 220, were 7 --a pretty large percentage. George Nicholas and Marx Myers were killed. Sergeant Heth, A. K. Crump, James Grame, George W. Hill, James Hollingsworth, A. P. Rogers, Bolling Pickett, and Tom Williams, wounded. The wounds are mostly slight. I think Crump's is probably the worst. He is wounded in the knee. The surgeons say that the bone is not broken, and he will not lose his leg, but it may be stiff, though I hope he may recover and have the use of it as well as ever. Two hundred and fifty nine Yankee prisoners have just passed, they were taken to-day at
the war, will, it is said, present some startling evidence. In the House of Representatives, on the 11th instant, Mr. Yeaman, of Kentucky, offered the following: Resolved, by the House of Representatives and the Senate concurring, That the proclamation of the President of the 22d September, 1862, is not warranted by the Constitution. Resolved, That the policy of emancipation, as indicated in the proclamation, is not calculated to hasten the restoration of peace, and is not well chosen as a war measure, and an assumption of power dangerous to the rights of citizens and the perpetuity of free government. Mr. Lovejoy moved to lay the resolution on the table. Agreed to — yeas 94, nays 55. Messrs. May and Crisfield voted no, Mr. Leary yea. Mr. Neell, of Missouri, desired leave to introduce a bill to secure the abolishment of slavery in the State of Missouri, and provide for the compensation of loyal persons there who own slaves. Mr. Wickliffe objected.
young men for a small tea-party, truly! Though commanding a regiment, Brownlow is nearly always out at the head of small scouting parties, trying to ambuscade our boys, and leaving saucy messages in writing for them at houses on the neutral ground. In one of these messages, about a month ago, he offered $5,000 if 100 of the best men of Patterson's regiment would come out and fight him and 100 of his men on open ground. Col. Patterson refused to allow this braggadocio to be noticed; but Lieut. May offered to come out with eighty men and most him and his hundred and clean him out, just for the fun of the thing — Brownlow didn't accept, and ever since then May has been trying to catch Brownlow, and Brownlow to catch May. May very nearly succeeded one day. He got on Brownlow's trail, and came up with him, their parties being about equal in number. After a brief carbonic and pistolonic interchange, Brownlow and his men fled, and May and his party pursued. May took individually after B
ntleman named Cock and a Mr. Telligan. The latter was murdered in cold blood, after he has surrendered. The Abiegden Virginian has the following about the probable, or rather improbable capture of the raiders: It is now reported that Col. May cut off their retreat through Burk's Garden, and that they attempted to make their way out through Mercer county, but when they get in the vicinity of the Cross Roads, they found that Celapel RcCarmland was in their front, and the only possible y cut off their retreat through Burk's Garden, and that they attempted to make their way out through Mercer county, but when they get in the vicinity of the Cross Roads, they found that Celapel RcCarmland was in their front, and the only possible way for their escape was by the way of Rocky Gap, Bland county. When they arrived here they met the gallant Col. Wm. R. Peters. with a portion of his new regiment and a small force sent him by Col. May, to whom report says, the Yankees surrendered.
Soldiers's last Massage to Gresley. --the Northern papers of the 27th contain the following dispatch from Mr. George N. Sounders, the last, we suppose, of the "peace negotiations": Buffalo, July 25.--The following dispatch has been received here from the Clifton House: "I send for the Associated Press a copy of my dispatch to Mr. Gresley: "To Hon. Horace Gresley: "What did you mean when you remarked to me, in preacher of Major May, that you hoped that we would not think we (you) were all blackguards? I certainly thought you wanted me to understand that you thought President Lincoln was. "G. N. "
Interesting speech of President Davis at Augusta. We give below a report from the Augusta (Georgia) papers of the speech of President Davis in that city on the 5th instant. It will be read with interest at this time. The President made his appearance, accompanied by Generals Beauregard, Hardee, Cobb, and a number of other officers, and on being introduced by Mayor May amid enthusiastic cheers, spoke as follows: Ladies and Gentlemen, Friends and Fellow Citizens of Georgia: At the moment of leaving your State, after having come hither to learn the exact truth as to the late military operations here, I go away much more confident than when I came. I have been to the army, and return imbued with the thought that they are as fully ready now as ever to meet the enemy, and that if all who are absent will return, and those owing service will go, thirty suns will not set before no foot of an invader will press the soil of Georgia. Never before was I so confident that en
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