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, Babb, Callais, and Ragin all fell in the gallant discharge of their duties, as also did J. Roarker Lane, of Company E, Fifth Virginia cavalry, who at the time was acting as my volunteer Aid. I cannot speak in too high terms of the behavior of the officers of this brigade. Colonel Barbour, though wounded, was from time to time with his command, giving all the assistance he could. Major Morris, wounded in the foot, left the hospital on horseback and assisted in re-forming his regiment. Major Mayhew, after the left wing of the Thirty-third was withdrawn, and Lieutenant-Colonel Cowan, wounded, gallantly commanded the skirmishers in the night attack, was wounded in the charge the next day, and is now thought to be in the hands of the enemy. Lieutenant-Colonel Spear was wounded in one of the night attacks, and Colonels Avery and Haywood, Lieutenant-Colonels George and Ashcroft, and Major Davidson, in the charge of Sunday morning. After the loss of so many field officers, Major Barry an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chancellorsville. (search)
ack, Weaver, Bouchelle, Babb, Callais and Regan, all fell in the discharge of their duties, as also did J. Rooker Lane of company E, Fifth Virginia cavalry, who at the time was acting as my volunteer aid. I cannot speak in too high terms of the behaviour of this brigade. Colonel Barbour, though wounded, was from time to time with his command, giving all the assistance he could. Major Morris, wounded in the foot, left the hospital on horseback, and assisted in reforming his regiment. Major Mayhew, after the left wing of the Thirty-third was withdrawn, and Lieutenant-Colonel Cowan was wounded, gallantly commanded the skirmishers in the night attack; was wounded in the charge next day, and is now thought to be in the hands of the enemy. Lieutenant-Colonel Speer was wounded in one of the night attacks, and Colonels Avery and Haywood, Lieutenant-Colonels George and Ashcraft, and Major Davidson in the charge Sunday morning. After the loss of so many field officers, Major Barry and
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 2: the secular writers (search)
er a piece of Mr. Belcher's cake and ginger-bread wrapped up in a clean sheet of paper: told her of her father's kindness to me when Treasurer, and I Constable. My daughter Judith was gone from me and I was more lonesome — might help to forward one another in our journey to Canaan. In the evening I visited Madam Winthrop, who treated me with a deal of courtesy; wine, marmalade. . . . 8r. 11th, 1720. I writ a few Lines to Madam Winthrop to this purpose: Madam, These wait on you with Mr. Mayhew's Sermon, and Account of the state of the Indians on Martha's Vineyard. I thank you for your unmerited favours of yesterday; and hope to have the happiness of waiting on you to-morrow before eight o'clock after Noon. I pray God to keep you, and give you a joyful entrance upon the two hundred and twenty-ninth year of Christopher Columbus his Discovery; and take leave, who am, Madam, your humble Servt. S. S. 8r. 12. Mrs. Anne Cotton came to door ('t was before 8.) said Madam Winthrop wa
n the burglar a set of false keys, not quite finished, by which he would certainly, within twenty-four hours, have had his mistress out of jail. Parent-Duchatelet found always the remains of modesty among the fallen women of Paris hospitals; and Mayhew, amid the London outcasts, says that he thinks better of human nature every day. Even among politicians, whom it is our American fashion to revile as the chief of sinners, there is less of evil than of good. In Wilberforce's Memoirs there is an labor from the moment of his baby's birth; he scarcely sees it when awake, and yet it is with him all the time. Every stroke he strikes is for his child. New social aims, new moral motives, come vaguely up to him. The London costermonger told Mayhew that he thought every man would like his son or daughter to have a better start in the world than his own. After all, there is no tonic like the affections. Philosophers express wonder that the divine laws should give to some young girl, almost
mmar, Washington Village, built, 1877 On Dudley street, built, 1874 Hancock (old), Hanover street, built, 1822 (New), Richmond street, built, 1847 High (English), Bedford street, built, 1821 (Latin) Warren avenue, built, 1879 Latin, So., School alley, built, 1652 Moved nearer the burying-place, 1652 Lawrence, Third street, South Boston, built, 1856 Lincoln, Broadway, South Boston, built, 1859 School Houses Lyman, Meridian street, East Boston, built, 1846 Mayhew, Hawkins street, built, 1803 Rebuilt, 1846 New Norman, Mason street, built, 1848 Newbury, Newbury street, built, 1875 Norcross, D street, South Boston, built, 1868 North Writing, Love lane, built, 1699 Rebuilt, 1712 Rebuilt by Gov. Hutchinson, 1717 Prescott, Prescott street, built, 1865 Phillips, Phillips street, built, 1862 Prince, Exeter street, built, 1880 Primary, on Richmond street, built, 1866 Quincy, Tyler street, built, 1848 Rebuilt, 1859 Ric
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Micaiah Towgood. (search)
. About this time he published a valuable tract on the sentiments suitable to a season of recovery from sickness. It was designed as a present to such of his congregation as had lately been raised from dangerous disorders, and contained serious reflections, resolutions, and devout meditations, suitable to persons in these circumstances. It passed through three editions in this country, besides a large impression in America, under the direction of the author's friend and correspondent, Dr. Mayhew, of Boston, in New England. In 1745, the year of the rebellion, our author again came forward in the character of a political divine; more excusably than before, because at that period it was scarcely possible not to connect the threatened restoration of the Stuart dynasty with the prevalence and, perhaps, even the reestablishment of Popery; notwithstanding the remarkable fact, that the great bulk of the Catholics of these kingdoms stood aloof from the conflict, while the most determine
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
Hiacoomes, the first Christian preacher on Martha's Vineyard; for a biography of whom the reader is referred to Increase Mayhew's account of the Praying Indians, 1726. The following is related of him: ‘One Lord's day, after meeting, where Hiacoomesthese Powwaws ever able to do these Christian Indians any hurt, though others were frequently hurt and killed by them.’ — Mayhew, pp. 6, 7, c. I. stood,— The wild apostle of the wood, Shook from his soul the fear of harm, And trampled on the Powwaw's Hiacoomes, the first Christian preacher on Martha's Vineyard; for a biography of whom the reader is referred to Increase Mayhew's account of the Praying Indians, 1726. The following is related of him: One Lord's day, after meeting, where Hiacoomes these Powwaws ever able to do these Christian Indians any hurt, though others were frequently hurt and killed by them. — Mayhew, pp. 6, 7, c. I. Note 16, page 363. The tooth-ache, says Roger Williams in his observations upon the language and c
by depriving it of its security, and religion of its power to solace, by subjecting it to supervision and control. His crime would not only enslave a present race of men, but forge chains for unborn generations. There can be no fouler deed. Tried by the standard of his own intentions and his own actions, Charles I., it may be, had little right to complain. Yet when history gives its impartial verdict William Prynne's Protestation, in Walker's Anarchia Anglicana, II. 52—54. So, too, Mayhew of Boston. Mass. Hist. Coll. II, 35. on the execution, it remembers that, by the laws of England, the meanest individual could claim a trial by his peers; and that the king was delivered, by a decimated parliament, which had prejudged his case, to a commission composed of his bitter and uncompromising enemies, and erected in defiance of the wishes of the people. His judges were but a military tribunal; and the judgment which assumed to be a solemn exercise of justice on the worst of crimin
heard of. But such had been the force of his example, that his father, though bowed down by the weight of seventy years, resolved on assuming the office of the son whom he had lost, and, till beyond the age of fourscore years and twelve, continued to instruct the natives of the isles; and with the happiest results. The Indians within his influence, though twenty times more numerous than the whites in their immediate neighborhood, preserved an immutable friendship with Massachusetts. See Mayhew's Indian Converts, and, at the end of it, T. Prince's Account of English ministers, &c. &c. Compare Neal's N. E.; Mather, b. VI. c. VI.; Gookin's Praying Indians, Ms. Thus churches were gathered among the heathen; villages of praying Indians established; at Cambridge an Indian actually became a bachelor of arts. 16 Yet Christianity hardly spread beyond the Indians on Cape Cod, Martha's Vineyard, and Nantucket, and the seven feeble villages round Boston. The Narragansetts, a powerful t
arrives, 427. Episcopal service, 428. Arbitrary taxation, 429. Solicits the restoration of its charter, II. 78. Territory enlarged, 81. Plans the conquest of Acadia, 217. Is refused a synod, 391 Withholds a fixed salary from the royal governor, 391. Recovers impressed seamen, 465. Massasoit, I. 317. Masts, II. 89; III. 106, 391. Mather, Cotton, III. 71. Champion of witchcraft, 76. Wonders of the invisible world, 95, 98. Mather, Increase, II. 434; III. 71, 83, 89, 375. Mayhew, II. 97. Melendez, I. 66. Mermet, Father, III. 198. Mesnard, Father Rene, III. 144. Lost among the Chippewas, 147. Miamis, III. 240. Miantonomoh, I. 361, 423, 424. Michigan visited by Jesuits, III. 128, 152, 155. French in, 194. Micmacs, III. 237. Milborne, III. 52. Executed, 54. Miller, governor of Carolina, II. 156. Miruelo Diego, I. 34. Mississippi company, III. 350, 354. Mississippi River discovered, I. 51; III. 157. Mississippi State, Soto in, I
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