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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 30 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 1 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boston, (search)
was a great elm, under which the Sons of liberty held meetings, and it was known as Liberty tree. On its branches the effigies of leaders among the supporters of the British ministers were hung. The house of Secretary Oliver, who had been appointed stamp-distributor, was attacked by a mob (Aug. 15, 1765), who broke his windows and furniture, pulled down a small building which they supposed he was about to use as a stamp-office, and frightened him into speedy resignation. At that time Jonathan Mayhew, an eloquent and patriotic preacher in Boston, declared against the Stamp Act from the pulpit, from the text, I would they were even cut off which trouble you. The riots were renewed on Monday evening after this sermon was preached. The luse of Story, registrar of the admiralty, was attacked (Aug. 26) and the public records and his private private papers were destroyed; the house of the comptroller of customs was plundered; and the rioters, maddened by spirituous liquors, prcceeded to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mayhew, Jonathan 1720- (search)
Mayhew, Jonathan 1720- Clergyman; born in Martha's Vineyard, Mass., Oct. 8, 1720; graduated at Harvard in 1744, and ordained minister of the West Church, Boston, in 1747, which post he held until his death, July 9, 1766. He was a zealous republican in politics, and his preaching and writing were remarkable for their controversial character. He warmly opposed the operations of the British Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, for he regarded it as an instrument for the spread of Episcopacy. He became involved in a controversy with Dr. Seeker, Archbishop of Canterbury, because the latter proposed the introduction of bishops into the colonies; co-operated with Otis and others in their resistance to measures of the British Parliament concerning the Americans; and was among the boldest of the Whigs. His death deprived the cause of a stanch champion.
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: philosophers and divines, 1720-1789 (search)
tyle, was Chauncy's younger contemporary, Jonathan Mayhew (1720-1766), a graduate of Harvard in 174ines of passive obedience and non-resistance. Mayhew gained a reputation for bringing a new style acharacter of God and a libel on human nature. Mayhew's opposition to the five points of Calvinism whis barber not to go and hear such a heretic. Mayhew was really that, for he violently resisted then the arrival of Whitefield in Boston in 1749, Mayhew claimed that the evangelist's hearers were chirobation reappears. So, like Chauncy himself, Mayhew offers the same antidote. In place of a God old that wisdom without goodness might be good, Mayhew held that goodness without wisdom might be badof the king of heaven, save his own glory. As Mayhew in his Discourse concerning unlimited submissiy of his hearers were in danger of hell fire. Mayhew calmly carried out that implication. He had tugh the two Massachusetts divines, Chauncy and Mayhew, one may traverse, by parallel paths, the whol[4 more...]
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
ts Circular Letter, The, 132 Massachusetts Historical Society, 20, 2 1 Massachusetts liberty song, 167 Massachusetts reports, 125 n. Massachusetts spy, 120, 121, 233 Matchless Orinda, 159 Mather, Cotton, 48, 49, 50-52, 54, 55, 91, 93, 153, 158, 161 Mather, Increase, 39, 49-50, 51, 54 Mather, Richard, 49, 156 Matthews, Albert, 120 n., 216 n. Matthews, Brander, 225 n. Matthews, Cornelius, 230 May day in town or New York in an Uproar, 219 Mayflower, 19 Mayhew, Jonathan, 78-80 Mayo, William Starbuck, 320 Mazeppa, 212 Meat out of the Eater, etc., 157 Medina, Louisa, 222, 230 Meditation on a Quart Mug, a, 95 Melanie, 280 Mellichampe, 315 Melville, Herman, 307, 309, 320-323 Memorabilia, 93 Memoirs of an American Lady, 311 Memoirs of the life of William Wirt, 312 M Menander, 178 M Mentoria, 285 n. Mercedes of Castile, 302 Mercury, 118 Meredith, George, 269, 276 Meredith, Hugh, 95 Merry tales of the three Wi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
of eighteenth-century Europe, need not be traced here. It is sufficient to observe that in America the Unitarians drew strength from the liberal wing of any or all of the Protestant churches. The less strict Calvinists, like Ezra Stiles. Jonathan Mayhew, and Charles Chauncy, are thus accounted to have been upon the verge of Unitarianism. Mayhew (died 1766) See also Book I, Chap. V. had been a champion not more of civil than of religious liberty. Stiles exhibited the Unitarian tolerancMayhew (died 1766) See also Book I, Chap. V. had been a champion not more of civil than of religious liberty. Stiles exhibited the Unitarian tolerance: he was the friend not only of Hopkins but of the Boston progressives and of the Newport rabbis. His administration at Yale is said to have broadened and secularized the college. In his pursuit of the intellectual life he touched another side of Unitarianism: he and Cotton Mather were the two American scholars whom Timothy Dwight considered able to stand comparison with British scholars. Chauncy See ibid. had condemned the more violent manifestations of the Great Awakening of 1740. In t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ora, and other poems, the, 40 Masque of the red death, the, 68 Massachusetts Historical Society, 114 Mass. Hist. Soc. Coll., 107 Massachusetts magazine, the, 162 n. Massachusetts quarterly review, the, 166 Massachusetts Spy, the, 178, 180 Master Skylark, 405 Mather, Cotton, 150, 204, 206, 396 Mathews, Cornelius, 152 Matthews, Brander, 388 Maud Muller, 48 Maupassant, 385, 386 Maurice of Nassau, 145, 147 Maximilian, 143, 145 Mayflower, the, 175 Mayhew, Jonathan, 206 May-Pole of Merry Mount, The, 23 Meadow Grass, 390 Medley, the, 161 Meek, A. B., 288, 298, 311 Mellonta Tauta, 67 Melville, Herman, 279, 281, 282, 284, 285 Memorials of a Southern planter, 314 Men and women, 137 Mendelssohn, 224 Menu, Laws of, 9 Mercury (Charleston), 296 Mercury (Newport), 178 Meredith, George, 18 Meredith, William Tuckey, 285 Merimee, 384 Merry Christmas, a, 381 Merry Mount, 134, 135, 136 Merwin, Henry Childs, 362 n.
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 16: ecclesiastical History. (search)
ade for the renewal of divine worship till the beginning of the year 1790. 1 Hist. Notice, p. 53. The edifice was then repaired, and an effort was made for the regular administration of religious services. Rev. Joseph Warren, Rev. William Montague, and others, officiated for short periods, but for nearly forty years the church was generally supplied with lay Readers, among whom were Theodore Dehon, afterwards Bishop of South Carolina, and Jonathan—Mayhew Wainwright, Grandson of Rev. Jonathan Mayhew of Boston, who, a half century earlier, was a most zealous and formidable adversary of Rev. Mr. Apthorp and of Episcopacy generally. afterwards Bishop of New York. The church was thoroughly repaired in 1825, and was again opened for service July 30th, 1826, when the Rev. George Otis, M. A., then tutor in the University, preached a sermon, afterwards printed. Hist. Notice, p. 61. Mr. Otis was chosen Rector, but declined the office, as it was supposed to be inconsistent—with his off
urity against religious and civil bondage. Of that cause the champion was Jonathan Mayhew, offspring of purest ancestors, nurtured by the ocean's-side, sanctified fs liberty, this made me conclude that freedom is a great blessing. Sermon of Mayhew's, printed in 1766. From early life, Mayhew took to his heart the right of privMayhew took to his heart the right of private judgment, clinging to it as to his religion. Truth and justice he revered as realities which every human being had capacity to discern. The duty of each individnothing before it but its own futurity. In January, 1750, the still youthful Mayhew, him- 1750. self a declared volunteer in the service, instinctively alarmed atbear a part in the defensive war against tyranny and priestcraft. Sermons of Mayhew, preached and printed in 1750. He reproved the impious bargain between the scept citizens delighted in the friendship of the eloquent teacher. The words of Mayhew were uttered at a time when the plautations engaged the whole thoughts of the m
ston Evening Post, 27 June, 1757. in chap. XII.} 1757. New England, petitions went up for the Prussian hero, who had drawn his sword in the cause of religious liberty, of the Protestant interest, and the liberties of Europe. His victories, said Mayhew, of Boston, are our own. Sermon of Cooper, of Boston, 24. Two Discourses by Jonathan Mayhew, 20, 22, 23. Too much attention has been given to the posthumous calumnies in which Voltaire exhaled his suppressed malice and spleen. In point of chJonathan Mayhew, 20, 22, 23. Too much attention has been given to the posthumous calumnies in which Voltaire exhaled his suppressed malice and spleen. In point of character Voltaire was vastly inferior to Frederic. The Reformation was an expression of the right of the human intellect to freedom. The same principle was active in France, where philosophy panted for liberty; where Massillon had hinted that kings are chosen for the welfare of the people; and Voltaire, in the empire of letters, marshalled hosts against priestcraft. Monarchy, itself, was losing its sanctity. The Bourbons had risen to the throne through the frank and generous Henry the Fou
ide in any person below the crown. Ezra Stiles to Franklin, Dec., 1761. You adore the Oliverian times, said Bernard to Mayhew, at Boston. I adore Him alone who is before all times, answered Mayhew, and at the same time avowed his zeal for the priMayhew, and at the same time avowed his zeal for the principles of the glorious Revolution of 1688, especially for the freedom of speech and of writing. Bradford's Life of Jonathan Mayhew, 222. Already he was known among royalists as an enemy to kings. The alarm rose every where to an extreme heightJonathan Mayhew, 222. Already he was known among royalists as an enemy to kings. The alarm rose every where to an extreme height, and every question of authority in church and state chap. XVIII.} 1762. was debated. The old Puritan strife with prelacy was renewed; and Presbyterians and Congregationalists were jealous of the favor shown by the royal governors to the establiedge among the Indians; but the king interposed his negative, and reserved the red men for the Anglican form of worship. Mayhew, on the other hand, marshalled public opinion against bishops; while Massachusetts, under the guidance of Otis, dismissed
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