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army were many mere youths, and among these there were found not a few rare instances of earnest piety maintained amidst all the evils and temptations of camp life. The following illustrative incident occurred under the ministrations of Rev. Dr. John C. McCabe, one of the post chaplains at Richmond: One day, in making his usual visitations, Dr. McCabe called in at the Maryland hospital, Richmond, and in making his rounds, was attracted to the bed of a young and delicate boy, suffering fDr. McCabe called in at the Maryland hospital, Richmond, and in making his rounds, was attracted to the bed of a young and delicate boy, suffering from the effects of protracted fever. The little fellow had seen only fourteen summers, and his thin, pale face bore marks of disease and suffering. The following occurred, as reported by the chaplain: How old are you, my son? said the reverend gentleman. I was fourteen my last birthday. Why, that is very young to be in the army? Yes, sir; but I thought it my duty. Where are you from? Mississippi, sir. What is your name? Dwight Sherwood. Why, that is a Nor
the Astor House until yesterday afternoon, when they were turned over to the custody of the United States Marshal, who will consign them to Fort Lafayette. The offence of these ministers was that in the Sunday service they had omitted the prayer for the President of the United States. The following scene is a specimen of what occurred in many parts of the South under Federal rule: As the Rev. H. R. Smith, of Leesburg, Va., came from the pulpit, after the usual Sabbath services, Capt. McCabe, one of Mr. Lincoln's officials, arrested him for disloyalty, objecting to his sermon, his prayer, and chapter read from the Bible. The sermon was written, and, on examination, they were constrained to withdraw their charge against it. But you did not pray for the President of the United States? Mr. Smith replied, No, sir, I prayed, as the Bible directs, for all in authority, and if you consider Mr. Lincoln your President you could join in that prayer. Well, the captain found that he m
, and composed of the flower of our Southern youth — appropriately uniformed and officered, turned out well, averaging about seventy each. The Charlottesville companies were full, and these, joined by the West Augusta Guard, who arrived about 10 ½ P. M., swelled the number of soldiers to near five hundred men, sent on a service both of danger and honor. Among the members of the Southern Guard, the University company, I noticed a relative of Bishop Elliott, of Georgia, and a son of the Rev. John C. McCabe.--Thousands assembled at the depot, and addresses were made to the gallant young soldiers by Shelton F. Leake, Esq., Col. Robert R. Prentis, Esq., Procter of the University of Virginia. Prof. Holmes and Mr. Berry of Alexandria, amid the waving of Handkerchiefs from the ladies, and the shouts of thousands. About 11 o'clock at night they moved off, while "God bless you," "good bye," and "be victorious," were uttered by many a lip. The forms of ministers of the gospel were amid the "b
Chaplain appointed. --The Rev. John C. McCabe, D. D. has been appointed Chaplain of the military posts in and about the city of Richmond.
pon he appointed the following gentlemen to prepare appropriate preamble and resolutions in reference to this great national and social bereavement, viz: Rev. John C. McCabe, D. D; Geo. M. Jackson, George Lemmon, Thos. B. M. Lewis, Esqrs., and Captain B. S. White. The committee retired, and in a short time reported the following: ate, to the Speaker of the Confederate Congress, and to the family of the illustrious deceased. On presenting the preamble and resolutions, the Chairman, Rev. Dr. McCabe, remarked: "Mr. President, the shortness of time intervening between the call of this meeting and the action of the same, has prevented the committee on o day to weep at his grave," and to enshrine his memory in our heart of hearts." The preamble and resolutions were unanimously adopted; and, on resolution, Dr.McCabe was requested to furnish his remarks for the press of the city. The committee, appointed to confer with the Committee of Arrangements of Congress were Mayor
Interesting lecture, to-night. --Rev. John C. McCabe, D. D., late of Baltimore, (whence he was driven for declining to pray for the President of the United States,) will to-night deliver the second of the series of lectures heretofore announced. The proceeds will be devoted to the amelioration in some degree of the sufferings of the inhabitants of Hampton, and the lecture will be delivered at the Broad street Methodist Church, corner of 10th street. That it will be an intellectual entertainment of a high order, we have every assurance. The lecturer, besides possessing eminent abilities, has many claims to the favor of a Richmond audience. If the church is not crowded to-night, it should be, at any rate. Other gentlemen, of acknowledged literary powers and acquirements, follow in the above good work on each Thursday night till the course is completed.
Dr. McCabe's lecture to-night, and the Hampton sufferers. We would call special attention to the second lecture in the regular winter course, which comes off to-night in the Lecture Room of the Broad Street Methodist Church, (Dr. Doggatt's,) by Rev. John C. McCabe, D. D. The character of the lecturer, who has occupied, at various times, the lecturer's stand in several of our large cities, including the Smithsonian Institute, Washington, and the subject, "Popular preaching, popular preacherRev. John C. McCabe, D. D. The character of the lecturer, who has occupied, at various times, the lecturer's stand in several of our large cities, including the Smithsonian Institute, Washington, and the subject, "Popular preaching, popular preachers, and average hearers," should, of themselves, secure a full and appreciative audience. But, in addition to this, we learn that the proceeds of this evening's lecture will be specially appropriated to the benefit of the Hampton sufferers. We bespeak for the occasion a full house.
Literary. --We understand that the "Petersburg Library Association" have invited the Hon. J. L. M. Curry, of Alabama, and the Rev. John C. McCabe, D. D., to repeat the lectures recently delivered by those gentlemen in this city, before that body. Both gentlemen, we learn, have accepted. Mr. Curry will lecture there on Tuesday, the 27th inst., and Dr. McCabe on the Tuesday night following. Our Petersburg friends may look out for a rich treat. Literary. --We understand that the "Petersburg Library Association" have invited the Hon. J. L. M. Curry, of Alabama, and the Rev. John C. McCabe, D. D., to repeat the lectures recently delivered by those gentlemen in this city, before that body. Both gentlemen, we learn, have accepted. Mr. Curry will lecture there on Tuesday, the 27th inst., and Dr. McCabe on the Tuesday night following. Our Petersburg friends may look out for a rich treat.
Soldiers buried. --The dead bodies of the members of the 48th North Carolina regiment, (18 in number,) which were brought into the city on Thursday, were interred in Oakwood Cemetery on the afternoon of that day, with appropriate religious services at the ground, by the Rev. John C. McCabe, D. D., Chaplain C. S. A.
Assault and battery. --Thomas Collier and Mike Walsh alias Nelson, were yesterday arraigned before the Mayor for assaulting and beating, a few days since, T. V. Ramos, a Portuguese barber, living on Main street. The Rev. John C. McCabe testified that the day on which the difficulty occurred he was walking in the direction of the basin, at the foot of 9th street, when he was met by Ramos running towards him, appealing for protection from a party of young men who were in close pursuit. He (the witness) expostulated and told them it was a pity to beat an old man like that, more especially as he was a cripple. Walsh replied, "D — n you, I'll strike you." McC.'s reply was, "I am a clergyman, sir," whereupon the same party said he "didn't care who he was." The witness then replied that he (Walsh) was a "cowardly scoundrel." Ramos was after wards kicked and cuffed about considerably, until an officer arrived and took the attacking party in custody. There being-no positive evidence t
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