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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 6 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion. You can also browse the collection for W. Gordon McCabe or search for W. Gordon McCabe in all documents.

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riginal position. Immediately the enemy drove it in, at the same time making an effort to carry the line of battle. They were promptly repulsed. An attack was then made on Hoke's line with a like result. The firing then ceased for the night. McCabe: Life and Campaigns of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Per contra. A little before dark it was evident from the commotion among the Confederates in front of the Philadelphia Brigade, and of the brigades on the right and left, that an assault was in pickets are very close to the enemy's . . . . . . . Major Wooten, 18th N. C. Infantry, met Col. Lyman and myself.—Diary of a Staff Officer. After some informalities in the asking had been adjusted, For interesting particulars on this point see McCabe's Life and Campaigns of Lee. the truce was granted the 7th, to last from 12 M. till 3 P. M. Then ensued a scene so anomalous in the prosecution of war! All the firing soon died away, the details went out from both sides to engage in the buria
the authorities of that city would be seized with such trepidation as would compel Grant to send a large part of Meade's army to protect it, and possibly would result in raising the siege of Petersburg. Life and Campaigns of IX. E. Lce, p. 544. McCabe. In accordance with this theory, about the 1st of July, he dispatched Gen. Early's corps in that direction, which resulted, as is well known, in exciting quite a commotion in the capital city, and Grant sent the Sixth Corps to meet the emergencywas instructed to take and hold a position near Chapin's Bluff, which commanded the enemy's pontoons across the river at this point. Gen. Grant must have been misinformed as to the location of these bridges. The lowest was above Drewry's Bluff.—McCabe's Life and Campaigns of Gen. Robert E. Lee. But owing to a probable misapprehension of the Lieutenant General, and to the large reinforcements sent hither by Gen. Lee, the expedition was a failure in this respect. This movement induced Gen. Lee
ing it with heavy loss. Here fell the Rebel General William J. Pegram, the Boy Artillerist, as his Confederate associates called him. In the spring of 1861, a youth of modest demeanor, he entered the military service as a private soldier; in the spring of 1865, still a mere lad, he fell in action, Colonel of Artillery, mourned by an army. . . . . Such was William Johnson Pegram of the Third Corps, who, at the early age of twenty-two, died sword in hand at the head of his men. Capt. W. Gordon McCabe,in Army of Northern Virginia Memorial volume. The discomfited men of the Maltese Cross now fell back pell-mell upon the position held by the Second Corps on Hatcher's Run. Elated with their easy victory, the Rebels burst from the wood two hundred yards distant, eagerly following up, when Battery K, which seemed to possess the faculty of being in the right place at the right time, and the supporting infantry of Mott's (Third) Division (De Trobriand's Brigade), —both posted at the cro