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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Edward R. McCall or search for Edward R. McCall in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ball's Bluff, battle at. (search)
tes had left Leesburg at a little past the middle of October, when General McClellan ordered General McCall, who commanded the advance of the right of the National forces in Virginia, to move forward and occupy Drainesville. At the same time he ordered General Stone to co-operate with General McCall, which he did by Map of Ball's Bluff. making a feint of crossing the river at the two ferries abint of concealment not far off, Misinformed as to the position of the confederates and supposing McCall to be near enough to give aid if necessary, Stone, on the morning of the 21st, ordered some Masse troops to the Maryland side of the river. He concluded to go forward, supposing the forces of McCall and others to be near. He was ignorant of the fact that General McClellan had ordered McCall toMcCall to fall back from Drainesville. On reaching the field of conflict, Baker took the chief command of all the forces on the Bluff, about 1,700 strong. Very soon afterwards, while he was in the thickest
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Enterprise, the. (search)
lag being nailed to the mast, it could not be lowered until the Americans should cease firing. It was found that Capt. Blyth had been cut nearly in two by an 18-pound cannon-ball. Almost at the same moment when Blyth fell on the Boxer, Burrows, of the Enterprise, was mortally wounded. So also was Midshipman Kervin Waters. Blyth was killed instantly; Burrows lived eight hours. The latter refused to be carried below until the sword of the commander of the Boxer was delivered to him, when he grasped it and said, Now I am satisfied; I die contented. The command of the Enterprise devolved upon Lieut. E. R. McCall, of South Carolina, who conducted his part of the engagement to its close with skill. He took both Vessels into Portland Harbor on the morning of the 7th. The two young commanders were buried side by side in a cemetery at Portland. Congress presented a gold medal to the nearest masculine representative of Lieutenant Burrows; and another was presented to Lieutenant McCall.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McCall, Edward R. 1790-1853 (search)
McCall, Edward R. 1790-1853 Naval officer; born in Charleston, S. C., Aug. 5, 1790; entered the navy as midshipman in 1808, and in the summer of 1813 was lieutenant of the brig Enterprise. In the action with the Boxer, Sept. 4, 1813, his commander (Lieutenant Burrows) was mortally wounded, when the command devolved upon McCall, who succeeded in capturing the British vessel. For this service Congress voted him a gold medal. He was made master-commander in 1825, and captain in 1835. He dofficer; born in Charleston, S. C., Aug. 5, 1790; entered the navy as midshipman in 1808, and in the summer of 1813 was lieutenant of the brig Enterprise. In the action with the Boxer, Sept. 4, 1813, his commander (Lieutenant Burrows) was mortally wounded, when the command devolved upon McCall, who succeeded in capturing the British vessel. For this service Congress voted him a gold medal. He was made master-commander in 1825, and captain in 1835. He died in Bordentown, N. J., July 31. 1853.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Medals. (search)
el GreeneVictory at Eutaw SpringsGold. Oct. 16, 1787Capt. John Paul JonesCapture of the Serapis, 1779Gold. March 29, 1800Capt. Thomas TruxtonAction with the Vengeance (French´╝ëGold. March 3, 1805Com. Edward PrebleTripoliGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Isaac HullCapture of the GuerriereGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Jacob JonesCapture of the FrolicGold. Jan. 29, 1813Capt. Stephen DecaturCapture of the MacedonianGold. March 3, 1813Capt. William BainbridgeCapture of the JavaGold. Jan. 6, 1814Lieut. Edward R. McCallCapture of the BoxerGold. Jan. 6, 1814Com. Oliver H. PerryVictory on Lake ErieGold. Jan. 6, 1814Capt. Jesse D. ElliottVictory on Lake ErieGold. Jan. 11, 1814Capt. James LawrenceCapture of the PeacockGold. Oct. 20, 1814Com. Thomas MacdonoughVictory on Lake ChamplainGold. Oct. 20, 1814Capt. Robert HenleyVictory on Lake ChamplainGold. Oct. 20, 1814Lieut. Stephen CassinVictory on Lake ChamplainGold. Oct. 21, 1814Capt. Lewis WarringtonCapture of the EpervierGold. Nov. 3, 1814Capt.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Seymour, Truman 1824-1891 (search)
Seymour, Truman 1824-1891 Military officer; born in Burlington, Vt., Sept. 24, 1824; graduated at West Point in 1846; served in the war against Mexico, and also in the Florida war (1856-58); and became captain of artillery in 1860. He was in Fort Sumter during its siege in 1861; joined the Army of the Potomac in March, 1862; and was made chief of artillery of McCall's division. Late in April of that year he was made brigadier-general, and commanded a brigade in the Peninsular campaign. He led a brigade in the battles at Groveton, South Mountain, and Antietam, and commanded a division in the assault on Fort Wagner, where he was severely wounded (July 18, 1863). In February, 1864, he commanded an expedition to Florida, and fought a battle at Olustee. He commanded divisions at the beginning of the Richmond campaign of 1864, and in the Shenandoah Valley the same year. He was in the Richmond campaign from December, 1864, to the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, and was brevetted maj