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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 8 (search)
the 27th at Gaines Mill, and had lost 4300 men out of 22,000 engaged. They were taking the aggressive against Kearny's, McCall's, and Hooker's divisions (about 25,000 men), carefully posted, with some protection and obstructions. A fourth division, Sedgwick's, was in reserve in a second line behind McCall, and a fifth, Slocum's, was near on the right, each over 8000 strong. Almost the whole of these 40,000 troops took part in the battle. Within an hour's march were Richardson's and Smith'ken and retaken several times. Once, when in possession of the 11th Ala. regiment of Wilcox's brigade, it was charged by McCall's Pa. Reserves, and after a desperate bayonet fight each side fell back to adjacent woods, leaving the guns deserted, but. P. Hill's about 1700; total 4300. The Federal losses are not given separately, but were, doubtless, not very unequal. McCall was captured, riding into our lines by mistake, and we also secured 18 guns, besides some prisoners, and the gleanings of
balloon observations, and made quite an imposing array, the peaceful character of which very much surprised the Federal forces when they occupied these works, after their evacuation in the spring. On the 19th, General McClellan having ordered McCall's division to Drainsville, about sixteen miles west of Alexandria, to cover reconnoissances in that quarter, and procure supplies, directed Brigadier-General Stone to feign a crossing of the Potomac from Poolsville, Maryland, and threaten Leesburg, held by one of General Beauregard's brigades, under Colonel Evans. He hoped by these movements to induce the evacuation of the place. On the 21st, while General McCall was returning to his camp at Langley, General Stone began crossing his division at Edwards's Ferry, and one of his subordinates, General Baker, engaged Colonel Evans in the forenoon. During the day General Stone threw over his entire division, and the battle continued until night, when the Federal forces were completely rou
rinth, Miss., 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, to May, 1863. 3rd Brigade, District of Memphis, Tenn., 5th Division, 16th Army Corps, to November, 1863. Fuller's Brigade, 2nd Division, 16th Army Corps, to March, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 4th Division, 16th Army Corps, to September, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 17th Army Corps, to July, 1865. Service. Siege operations against New Madrid, Mo., March 3-14, 1862. Siege and capture of Island No.10, Mississippi River, and capture of McCall's forces at Tiptonville, Mo., March 15-April 8. Expedition to Fort Pillow, Tenn., April 13-17. Moved to Hamburg Landing, Tenn., April 18-22. Action at Monterey April 29. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Reconnoissance toward Corinth May 8. Occupation of Corinth and pursuit to Booneville May 30-June 12. Duty at Clear Creek till August 20, and at Bear Creek till September 11. Battle of Iuka, Miss., September 19. Battle of Corinth October 3-4.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
Md., till October 3, 1861; then on eastern shore of Maryland under Lockwood picketing and scouting till January, 1862; then joined Regiment. Regiment attached to McCall's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Cavalry, McDowell's 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1862. Bayard's Cavalry Brigade, Dept. oft Harrisburg, Philadelphia and Pittsburg August to October, 1861. Ordered to Washington, D. C. Attached to Defenses of Washington, D. C., till May, 1862. McCall's Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. McCall's Division, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1862. 1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, McCall's Division, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1862. 1st Brigade, Cavalry Division, Army of the Potomac, to September, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Pleasanton's Cavalry Division, Army of the Potomac, to November, 1862. Averill's Cavalry Brigade, Center Grand Division, Army of the Potomac, to February, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division,
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
of the Potomac, to April, 1862. Artillery, McCall's Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to Junece to Tennallytown, Md., September 25 and join McCall. Attached to 1st Brigade, McCall's Pennsylv Tennallytown, Md. Attached to 2nd Brigade, McCall's Pennsylvania Reserves Division, Army of the Tennallytown, Md. Attached to 2nd Brigade, McCall's Pennsylvania Reserves Division, Army of the ice July 27, 1861. Attached to 2nd Brigade, McCall's Pennsylvania Reserves Division, Army of the f the Potomac, to April, 1862. 2nd Brigade, McCall's Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to Junef the Potomac, to April, 1862. 3rd Brigade, McCall's Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to Juneice June 29, 1861. Attached to 2nd Brigade, McCall's Pennsylvania Reserves Division, Army of the Md., August 10-13. Attached to 3rd Brigade, McCall's Pennsylvania Reserves Division, Army of the f the Potomac, to April, 1862. 3rd Brigade, McCall's Division, Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June[24 more...]
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States--Regular Army. (search)
, Va., May 26-July 1. Lynchburg July 17-18. Catawba Mountains June 21. Sheridan's Shenandoah Valley Campaign August 7-November 28. Berryville September 3. Battle of Opequan, Winchester, September 19. Fisher's Hill September 22. Battle of Cedar Creek October 19. Duty in the Shenandoah Valley and in the Dept. of West Virginia, till July, 1865. At Washington, D. C., till-- Battery C 5th United States Artillery Organized September, 1861. Attached to Artillery, McCall's Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. Artillery, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to April, 1862, and Dept. of the Rappahannock, to June, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, 5th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, 3rd Corps, Army of Virginia, to September, 1862. Artillery, 3rd Division, 1st Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to February, 1863. Artillery, 2nd Division, 1st Army Corps, to May, 1863. 1st Regular Brig
re served. About 7 A. M. the bridge over Cedar Swamp Creek was destroyed and the march resumed. The sun was extremely hot and as the light rain of the night before had ceased at daybreak, the roads were soon as dry and dusty as ever. At about noon the regiment filed into a field on the left of the road at Nelson's Farm, or Glendale and remained closed in mass until about 4 P. M., the men watching the wagon trains as they passed in their hurry to reach Malvern Hill. During this time General McCall's troops from McDowell's department filed into the field. At about 4 P. M. heavy firing from both artillery and infantry was heard in the direction from which the regiment had come. When the last struggling wagon had passed, the Nineteenth was again in motion, but this time it went back over the road to the swamp, in the direction of the firing. The stream of wagon trains and artillery had powdered the clayey road until the dust was ankle deep and, rising in a dense cloud, it envel
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 12: General George B. McClellan and the organization of the army of the Potomac (search)
ifth corps was given to Fitz John Porter, a sixth to Franklin. McDowell had for division commanders at first Franklin, McCall, and King; Sumner-Richardson, Sedgwick, and Bleriker. Heintzelman's division commanders were Fitz John Porter, Hooker, a natural query was: What will our enemy do next? To ascertain this, reconnoissances were undertaken. The divisions of McCall and W. F. Smith marched out westward on October 19th. McCall, farthest south, bearing off northwesterly, passed through McCall, farthest south, bearing off northwesterly, passed through the village of Dranesville, and finding no enemy kept on five or six miles beyond toward Leesburg. He delayed his return march from time to time to enable his staff to gather local knowledge and make sketches of the country. A. telegram to McClella Upon receiving this message McClellan caused to be telegraphed to General Stone, at Poolsville, Md. (upper Potomac): General McCall occupied Dranesville yesterday and is still there; will send out heavy reconnoissances to-day in all directions from
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
rcumstances that gave rise to the battle of Ball's Bluff, and the main features of that massacre, belong to this story, and may be told in a few words. General Charles P. Stone commanded what he called a corps of observation, on the Maryland side of the Potomac River. His pickets extended from the mouth of the Monocacy, on the north, to meet with those of Banks's division on the south. Stone occupied Poolsville as his headquarters. Between the twentieth and twenty-second of October General McCall had advanced from the Army of the Potomac on the right bank of that river as far as Drainsville, his object being to ascertain the number and intentions of the enemy at Leesburg. In co-operating with this movement General Stone sent a large force to Edward's Ferry, and increased the command at Harrison's Island. At Edward's Ferry, three miles from Poolsville, Stone made a feint of crossing the river, on the 20th, at one o'clock P. M. Several boat-loads of troops crossed and recrossed,
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
eral McClellan to move against the enemy, 99. His interview with R. M. Copeland, 256, 267 (notes). His action in regard to the promotion of General Gordon, 259. Little Washington, Va., sickness in the army at, 277. Lotbrop, Rev. Dr., preaches to the Sec-ond Mass. Regiment in camp at Darnstown, Md., 55, 56. M Macdowell, Va., battle of, 179. Mason, Colonel, 124. Mathews, Major, of the Forty-sixth Penn., dangerously wounded at Cedar Mountain, 304. Maulsby, Colonel, 110. McCall, General, Federal officer in Civil War, 64. McClellan, General George B., 29. His policy of caution, 60. Confidence of the writer in, 99. Is placed at the head of the army of the Potomac, and deposed as commander-in-chief, 101. Takes the field under the President's Order No. 1, 103. His excellent organization of the army, 113. His new plan of operations, and orders to Banks to pursue Stouewall Jackson, 133. 134. Protests against the withdrawal of his army from Harrison's Landing, 2
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