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urged him to oppose its acceptance, but he refused to interfere. On the 26th of December, Grant wrote to Halleck: I am just in receipt of a letter from General G. B. McClellan, saying that he proposes visiting Europe soon with his family, and that Mrs. McClellan desires to see her father before starting, and requests a leave of Mrs. McClellan desires to see her father before starting, and requests a leave of absence for Colonel Marcy [Mrs. McClellan's father], that this desire may be gratified. I do not know the special duty Colonel Marcy may be on at this time, and do not therefore wish the leave granted [from here], lest it may interfere with important duties. If not inconsistent with the public service, however, I wish the leave Mrs. McClellan's father], that this desire may be gratified. I do not know the special duty Colonel Marcy may be on at this time, and do not therefore wish the leave granted [from here], lest it may interfere with important duties. If not inconsistent with the public service, however, I wish the leave to be granted from Washington. Sherman was to move immediately after the election, and on the 11th of November, he sent his last despatch. It was addressed to Halleck as chief of staff, but intended of course for Grant and the government. I have balanced all the figures well, he said, and am satisfied that General Thomas has
4th for Fredericksburg and Manassas. (1012) Mentioned by Gen. S. D. French in report from Evansport, December 30th. (1013) Mentioned in General Holmes' letter from Brooks' Station, December 31st. (1018) Spoken of again by same, January 2, 1862. (1020) Ordered by secretary of war, January 5, 1862, to Richmond, to regain their strength after going through the usual camp diseases. (1035) F. H. Holmes writes: The regiment has suffered greatly from measles. Vol. Ix—(379) Mentioned by General McClellan. Vol. XI, Part 1—(309) Mentioned in Gen. Winfield S. Hancock's report of reconnoissance toward Yorktown, April 7, 1862. (404) Mentioned in Gen. John B. Magruder's report of the siege of Yorktown. (583) Mentioned in Col. M. Jenkins' report of the battle of Williamsburg. Vol. XI, Part 2—(486) In Pryor's brigade, Longstreet's division, Magruder's corps, engagements around Richmond. (503, 980) Casualties, 70 killed and 253 wounded in the fights before Richmond, June 2
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the armies in Virginia in which Alabama troops were engaged. (search)
ops, 15th Inf. Seven Pines (or Fair Oaks), Va., May 31. Gen. Longstreet, 8300; loss 980 k, 4749 w, 405 m.—Federal, Gen. McClellan, 14,000; loss 790 k, 3594 w, 647 m. Alabama troops, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 26sville. Seven Days Battles, Va., June 25 to July 1. Gen. R. E. Lee, 85,000; loss 3286 k, 15,909 w, 940 m.—Federal, Gen. McClellan, 105,445; loss 1734 k, 8062 w, 6053 m. Alabama troops, same as at Mechanicsville. Cedar Mt., Va., Aug. 9. Gen. 10th, 11th, 14th, 44th Inf. Antietam, Md., Sept. 17. Gen. R. E. Lee, 35,000; loss 1512 k, 7816 w, 1844 m.—Federal, Gen. McClellan, 60,000; loss 2108 k, 9549 w, 753 m Alabama troops, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th. 13th, 14th, 15tff. Davis Battrs. Maryland campaign, Sept. 12 to 20. Gen. R. E. Lee, 35,000; loss 1890 k, 9770 w, 2304 m.—Federal, Gen. McClellan, 87,000; loss 2661 k, 11704 w, 13491 m. Alabama troops, same as at Antietam. Shepherdstown, Va.. Sept. 19-20.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
burg and Barhamsville. During this period, before the evacuation of the defences of Yorktown, I was in command of a legion of 2,000 men and two regiments of Virginia Volunteers in the Kanawha valley. To pass over the scenes there of Scary and Pocataligo, and the evacuation of that valley, and the burning of Gauley Bridge, and of Carnifax, and of Honey Creek, on the east peak of Sewell Mountain, and of Camp Defiance and the Slaughter Pen of Roanoke Island, after Richmond was invested by McClellan's army, my legion was converted into a brigade of infantry, and was reorganized. The 46th and 59th Virginia Regiments of the legion were left to my command, and to these were added the 26th and 34th Regiments of Virginia, largely composed of men from the counties of Mathews, Gloucester, King and Queen and Essex. This reorganization was effected early in the spring of 1862, and we were soon posted to guard the batteries at Chaffin's Bluff and the entire district from Richmond to Williamsb
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
e he joined with Lee in the campaign against McClellan in 1862; that he had followed his detour aroll him that they could make no resistance if McClellan attacked them in the morning. It was diffic is now no danger of the line being broken. McClellan's inaction during the long 18th when Generalm in line of battle with Hill and wait until McClellan retreated towards the Pamunkey, and then to fight. It was only when Jackson found that McClellan was not being driven from his works that he re they could easily join with the forces of McClellan then at Alexandria. Almost any other soldie intrench and wait for the reinforcements of McClellan then on their way to him. The attack that ever subjected. 80,000 Federal soldiers under McClellan attacked 35,000 Confederates under Lee, makiss, ragged Confederates had routed 31,000 of McClellan's best soldiers, and in a plain open field s a mistake. He told me at one o'clock that McClellan had done his worst. He was looking all the [2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
esprit du corps they were so noted for. The charge at Burkitsville. Although in nearly all the engagements from Yorktown, around Richmond, Manassas and on the march into Maryland, it was at Burkitsville, September 13, 1862, The Cobb Legion, Georgia Cavalry, first asserted its individuality. With nine skeleton companies, reduced by the casualties of months of hard fighting and marching to less than one-fourth we had started with, Young was ordered and led the sabre charge against McClellan's advance guard on that road, hurrying to the relief of Harper's Ferry, hurling back two of their crack regiments, the 8th Illinois and 3d Indiana cavalry, upon the infantry of the Army of the Potomac. The picture can never be forgotten by those who witnessed it. We had to charge down a steep, rocky lane by twos between stone fences, from whose shelter their dismounted men were firing on us, over a narrow plateau, where we deployed into a company front at the run. The Dougherty Hussars of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
nfronted by a host of more than 100,000. General McClellan, styled through the favoring pride of his duration, to await the full development of McClellan's plans. At Yorktown, the trying duty of se ball that resulted in the demoralization of McClellan's forces, and his rapid retreat to the sheltoint that D. H. Hill's charge was directed. McClellan's defeated army fell back upon Malvern Hill,hmond. No further movement was attempted by McClellan on the Peninsula. The next movement of the 's division behind to watch the movements of McClellan, marched on the 13th of August with the mainas fought, and not to prevent the advance of McClellan, as was believed in the North from an exaggeting since the 25th of June. It had fought McClellan's army from Richmond to the James, and then round and fought Pope's army, reinforced by McClellan's, from the Rapidan to the Potomac. The ordg that reinforcements were coming forward to McClellan, who had been put in command again after Pop[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
Hill left their camp north of the Chickahominy, and marched, via the Long Bridge and Darbytown roads, to intercept General McClellan in his retreat to James river. The distance of sixteen miles was made, and those weary survivors of the desperate day before, and made no allusion to it. I gave him Mr. Allen's description of Malvern Hill, and presumed to say: If General McClellan is there in force we had better let him alone. Longstreet laughed and said: Don't get scared now that you have got, by energetic handling of his troops, making a great show and movement and clatter, held the corps commanders, to whom McClellan applied for aid in behalf of Porter, so fully occupied that they declared they could spare none. Of the devoted, loyd and held at bay until Johnston's forces could march to the rescue. At Savage's station he attacked the rear guard of McClellan's army, and inflicted severe loss on the Federals. From that point he had moved with great alacrity to Timberlake's st
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A horror of the war. [from the Richmond, Va., times, March 14, 1897.] (search)
des was my friend and playmate, and I saw him shot from a distance, but did not at the time know who it was. Early in November Captain A. E. Richards, with ten men, was sent to the rear of Sheridan's army, then lying between Middletown and Strasburg. From a position near the turnpike, in the course of the day he captured fifteen prisoners, among whom were Captain Brewster, of Custer's staff, and his brother, a lawyer, bound on a canvassing expedition to the army in the interest of General McClellan. There were also among the prisoners a news-boy and a drummer-boy. The news-boy had often before been captured by Richards, but had always been released, and on this occasion received the same clemency. The drummer-boy claimed his liberty likewise, and pleaded hard for it; but Richards said: No; the drum excites men to battle, but the newspaper is often the source of demoralization and defeat. As the prisoners, in charge of Dr. Sowers, were passing through Ashby's Gap, they were me
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ed the fact that the enemy was running and a victory was gained. After camping on the battlefield over night, the march was continued. Lieutenant-Colonel Armfield being sick, Major L. D. Andrews was now in command. The regiment was engaged at Cold Harbor and Frazier's Farm. At the latter place the Confederate troops fought with unusual bravery, not seeming to realize the presence of danger, and victory was again gained by the Confederates. The Southern soldiers were now all jubilant. McClellan's On to Richmond, was now changed to On to Harrison's Landing, where the gun-boats lay. The pursuit of the enemy was continued, and the next engagement was at Malvern Hill. The battle at this place was a very hard fought one, but the 38th was not in the thickest of it, and did not lose very heavily. The enemy continued to flee, and were pursued to their gun-boats at Harrison's Landing. After remaining there a few days, the division was ordered to Richmond, and it remained below that c
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