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Doc. 96.-occupation of Williamsburgh, Va. General McClellan's despatches. headquarters army of the Potles which preceded and attended the retreat of Gen. McClellan from the Chickahominy toward Harrison's Landing. When first General McClellan began to intimate by his despatches that he designed making this movement towarnd urged upon him that he should send orders to Gen. McClellan that if he were unable to maintain his positiont that the retreat to James River was carrying General McClellan away from any reinforcements that could possibany of the forces under my command to reenforce Gen. McClellan without rendering it certain that the enemy, evthe President and the Secretary of War. After General McClellan had taken up his position at Harrison's Landino this communication, I received a letter from General McClellan, very general in its terms, and proposing nothon between them, some military superior both of Gen. McClellan and myself should be called to Washington and p
Doc. 96.-occupation of Williamsburgh, Va. General McClellan's despatches. headquarters army of the Potomac, Williamsburgh, May 6, 1862. Hon. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War: I have the pleasure to announce the occupation of this place, as the result of the hard-fought action of yesterday. The effect of Hancock's brilliant engagement yesterday afternoon was to turn the left of the enemy's line of works. He was strongly reenforced, and the enemy abandoned the entire position during the night, leaving all his sick and wounded in our hands. The enemy's loss yesterday was very severe. We have three hundred uninjured prisoners and more than a thousand (rebel) prisoners wounded. Their loss in killed is heavy. The victory is complete. I have sent cavalry in pursuit, but the roads are in very bad condition. The conduct of our men has been excellent, with scarcely an exception. The enemy's works are very extensive and exceedingly strong, both in respect to their po
of battles which preceded and attended the retreat of Gen. McClellan from the Chickahominy toward Harrison's Landing. When first General McClellan began to intimate by his despatches that he designed making this movement toward James River, I suggm it, and urged upon him that he should send orders to Gen. McClellan that if he were unable to maintain his position upon tresident that the retreat to James River was carrying General McClellan away from any reinforcements that could possibly be so send any of the forces under my command to reenforce Gen. McClellan without rendering it certain that the enemy, even in tm upon the President and the Secretary of War. After General McClellan had taken up his position at Harrison's Landing, I adreply to this communication, I received a letter from General McClellan, very general in its terms, and proposing nothing towoperation between them, some military superior both of Gen. McClellan and myself should be called to Washington and placed i
Doc. 44.-letter from Major-General G. B. McClellan. The attack on Munson's Hill. The following letter, addressed to Colonel H. L. Scott, explains itself. Geneva, Switzerland, Jan. 11, 1866 [7]. Colonel: I received last evening yours of the twenty fourth December, informing me that a friend had written to you as follows: When we meet, I will tell you of the generally prevailing prejudice against you in New York and elsewhere, growing out of the story that General McClellan had in some way intimated that you had had correspondence with the rebels and had given them important information, before McClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think iMcClellan's attack on Munson's Hill (I think it was), not far from Washington. You are entirely correct in believing that no intimation from me led to the foregoing accusation. I am ignorant of the origin of the story, but I know that no word or thought of mine could possibly have given rise to it. It affords me great pleasure to have the opportunity of repeating to you wh
force. G. B. McClellan. Barnard to McClellan.Washington, March 19, 1862, 2.30 P. M. des must gratified by what he said. It was: Gen. McClellan has no firmer friend than myself; but I may not be where I am long. I think Gen, McClellan ought not to move till he is fully ready. I t Fox to McClellan.Washington, March 13. Gen. McClellan: The Monitor is more than a match for t Wise to McClellan.Washington, March 13. Gen. McClellan: In reply to your telegram I am clearlyortress Monroe. H. A. Wise. Wool to McClellan.Fort Monroe, March 12. Gen. McClellan: Itntzelman to McClellan.Fort Lyon, March 13. Gen. McClellan: Allow me to recommend to you to have a Heintzelman, Brig.-Gen. Dennison to McClellan.Washington, March 14. Gen. McClellan: Havrd ship. G. B. McClellan, Maj.-Gen. McClellan to Van Vliet.Fairfax Court-House, March 13, to the President. G. B. McClellan. McClellan to Stanton.headquarters, Army of the Potomac[11 more...]
ry and none of the ammunition, forage, and provision trains could be brought. up. Heintzelman early in the day came under the artillery-fire of the works of Yorktown, and soon saw that an assault was impracticable. Keyes also found himself brought to a halt by the artillery-fire of the Lee's Mill works, and discovered that they were covered by the Warwick river, rendering any attempt at assault utterly out of the question. It was at this moment, with the leading division of each column under a hot artillery-fire, and the skirmishers of the 3d corps engaged, being myself with Porter's division, that I received the telegram informing me of the withdrawal of the 1st corps (McDowell's) from my command: adjutant-general's office, April 4, 1862. Gen. McClellan: By directions of the President Gen. McDowell's army corps has been detached from the force under your immediate command, and the general is ordered to report to the Secretary of War; letter by mail. L. Thomas, Adj.-Gen.
ens. Sumner, Heintzelman, and Keyes, and was concurred in by Maj.-Gen. McClellan, who first proposed Urbana as our base. This army being rsix generals, viz.: Fremont, Banks, McDowell, Wool, Burnside, and McClellan, besides the scrap, over the Chesapeake, in the care of Dix. Teparate department, and, as this letter advocates his return to Gen. McClellan's command, it is proper to state that I am not at all influenceresent fine command, I owe much to Gen. McDowell and nothing to Gen. McClellan. But I have disregarded all such officiousness, and I have from last July to the present day supported Gen. McClellan and obeyed all his orders with as hearty a goodwill as though he had been my brother os gained on the 5th. I verified all these reconnoissances General McClellan reconnoitring at Yorktown. in person, going everywhere beyon 10, to Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War: I reached Gen. McClellan's headquarters at seven this evening, having had an accident to
n. Heintzelman. Very truly yours, J. F. Missroom, Com. To Maj.-Gen. Mcclellan. Wachusett, April 10, 1862. My dear general: Encloser L. M. Goldsborough, Minnesota. Washington, April 16 To Gen. McClellan: Good for the first lick! Hurrah for Smith and the one-gun lan, Maj.-Gen. Commanding. Washington, April 27, 1862. Maj.-Gen. McClellan: I am rejoiced to learn that your operations are progress last night. J. F. Missroom. Fortress Monroe, May 4. Maj.-Gen. McClellan: With my whole heart I do most cordially congratulate you Goldsborough, Flag-Officer. Washington, May 4, 1862. Maj.-Gen. McClellan: Accept my cordial congratulations upon the success at Yo. Stanton, Secretary of War. Fort Monroe, May 5, 1862 Maj.-Gen. McClellan: The Secretary of War telegraphs me to inform him how mane of the boat did not admit of answering, and in the absence of Gen. McClellan to the front, I have to inform you that the general has ordered
t between four and five o'clock. I found everything in a state of chaos and depression. Even the private soldiers saw clearly that, with force enough in hand to gain a victory, we, the pursuers, were on the defensive and content with repulsing attacks, and that there was no plan of action, no directing head. The front line was formed along the nearer edge of the woods, and the rest massed inactive in the clearings. The troops were weary and discouraged; but my presence Dan Webster, Gen. McClellan's War-horse. at once restored their confidence, and, as they recognized me passing rapidly through their ranks, their wild and joyful cheers told the enemy, as well as our own people, that something unusual had occurred, and that the period of uncertainty and inaction was at an end. I at once gathered the general officers around me, called upon them for a brief statement of affairs, and promptly made up my mind as to what should be done. This occurred in the clearing, close to the W
ed by Gen. Shields's division you will move upon Richmond by the general route of the Richmond and Fredericksburg Railroad, co-operating with the forces under Gen. McClellan, now threatening Richmond from the line of the Pamunkey and York rivers. While seeking to establish as soon as possible a communication between your left wing and the right wing of Gen. McClellan, you will hold yourself always in such position as to cover the capital of the nation against a sudden dash of any large body of the rebel forces. Gen. McClellan will be furnished with a copy of these instructions, and will be directed to hold himself in readiness to establish communicatGen. McClellan will be furnished with a copy of these instructions, and will be directed to hold himself in readiness to establish communication with your left wing, and to prevent the main body of the enemy's army from leaving Richmond and throwing itself upon your column before a junction of the two armies is effected. A copy of his instructions in regard to the employment of your force is annexed. By order of the President. Edwin M. Stanton, Secretary of War.
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