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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 231 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 172 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 115 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 90 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 89 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 69 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for H. B. McClellan or search for H. B. McClellan in all documents.

Your search returned 47 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
bility of Lee, and others of his subordinates, and his tribute to the splendid fighting qualities of the Army of Northern Virginia, are very handsomely done, and we take off our hat to the gallant soldier who could see these qualities in Rebels, and has had the moral courage to publish his convictions. His criticisms of our especial pets--General John Pope, General Halleck, and General Milroy--are as scathingly severe as they are fully sustained by the facts. He very ably defends General McClellan from charges made against him in connection with Pope's disasters, and makes a most triumphant vindication of General Fitz. John Porter from the charges under which that gallant soldier has suffered for these long years. And now we must regret that so good a book should be marred by some very serious blemishes, which our space does not allow us now to point out, but to which we shall hereafter fully pay our respects. We hold ourselves prepared to show that in his treatment of the r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers and losses at slaughter's mountain ( Cedar Run ) (search)
ticed in your last number) is, however, by far the most elaborate and useful. Indeed, it is the most extensive and carefully prepared account of Pope's campaign (after Cedar Run) that I have met with. It is vivid, and, with some exceptions, which may be credited to the natural bias of an earnest and active participant in the struggle, it is fair and truthful. The faults of style, which are many, and the diffuseness with which the jealousies and spites of Halleck, Pope, Fitz John Porter, McClellan and others are told over and over again, may be pardoned to a gallant soldier, more at home on a hard fought field than in the cabinet. Nor is his own temper always serene. General Banks probably considers him a good hater, if no worse. But General Gordon's clear and vigorous description, his manly independence, his oftentimes generous appreciation of his foemen, are qualities that far outweigh his imperfections. I write not to review his book. There are passages in the history of P
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), McClellan and Lee at Sharpsburg (Antietam).--a review of Mr. Curtis' article in the North American review. (search)
an Review contains an interesting article on McClellan's last great service to his country, in whicf the capacity, conduct and character of General McClellan goes. A long and intimate association wl the commanders of the Army of the Potomac, McClellan alone inspired his troops with enthusiastic discussed by Mr. Curtis--a campaign in which McClellan evinced the very highest capacities of a genand deposed him. The clearness with which McClellan divined Lee's movements after the defeat of eral Governments, and of General Lee and General McClellan, all contradict every paragraph of Mr. Craph 4 is correct as far as it goes; but General McClellan tells us he lost in killed, wounded and stakes the total number of troops engaged by McClellan for the total strength of his army present weveral thousand cavalry and artillery, while McClellan's army confronted him on the line of the Anteld, demoralized, 87,164 men--four-fifths of McClellan's whole army! We will now sum up McClella[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Williamsburg and the charge of the Twenty-fourth Virginia of Early's brigade. (search)
daring charge. * * * * * It contributed largely to detain McClellan, to demoralize his troops and to secure our retreat from , just out of sight and range. Although in command — for McClellan seems to have considered that the position for the genera extent of three brigades (Smith's two and Naglee's), General McClellan sent him immediately after his arrival from the rear. It is noteworthy, that although McClellan's army was in pursuit of a retiring foe, he himself, instead of being in the vace had expired, and to elect their officers! Nor did General McClellan ever again try the experiment of attacking General Joof hostile hand. In his first dispatch to Lincoln, General McClellan states that Hancock had repulsed Early's brigade by aold steel. But so in fact it was. And in answer to General McClellan and Mr. Swinton and others, the writer hereof, who legments and thanks for saving their comrade's life. General McClellan, with his usual exaggeration when counting Confederat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Strength of Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862--field returns. (search)
and regiment, and a battery of artillery. On the 14th of June, 1862, just four days after the battle of Port Republic, the returns then made show the following number of officers and men present for duty in the infantry: In Elzey's brigade: Officers95 Enlisted men1,049 In Trimble's brigade: Officers123 Enlisted men1,049 In Taylor's brigade: Officers106 Enlisted men1,793   Aggregate4,967 These are the last returns before the movement to join General Lee in the attack on McClellan. The First Maryland regiment had then been detached from Elzey's brigade, and the Twelfth Georgia, Twenty-fifth and Thirty-first Virginia regiments, had been transferred to it. The Forty-fourth, Fifty-second and Fifty-eighth Virginia regiments, all small regiments at that time, were subsequently transferred to the brigade, and constituted a part of it in the battles around Richmond. The artillery attached to tie brigades was absent at Mechum's River depot, to replenish ammunition and get
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
e former city Major W. O. Dod, President; Major E. H. McDonald, Secretary, and Hon. H. W. Bruce, an active member, of the Louisville Branch of our Society; and in the latter city, G. W. Ranck, Secretary of the Kentucky Historical Society; Major H. B. McClellan, formerly of General J. E. B. Stuart's staff, and Captain C. H. Morgan, formerly of General John H. Morgan's staff, and to receive from them all, not only personal courtesies, but assurances of valuable help in our great work. Judge BrucBranch of our Society; and in the latter city, G. W. Ranck, Secretary of the Kentucky Historical Society; Major H. B. McClellan, formerly of General J. E. B. Stuart's staff, and Captain C. H. Morgan, formerly of General John H. Morgan's staff, and to receive from them all, not only personal courtesies, but assurances of valuable help in our great work. Judge Bruce, Major Dod, Major McClellan, and Captain Morgan all promised us papers which will prove of great interest and real historic value.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of General Beauregard's service in West Tennessee in the Spring of 1862. (search)
tions, even had he asked him any questions in that conversation, which I know he did not. General Beauregard did know, however, that the enemy had gunboats of the heaviest metal to protect the fragments of Grant's army as effectually as our wooden steamers had maintained our little force of 3,000 men in a far less favorable position at New Madrid, against 25,000 men, under the notorious Pope, as long as it was thought expedient to hold the place, or, as since then, and more prominently, McClellan found efficient refuge with his routed forces under fire of his gunborts on James river. The enemy's gunboats were at once put in requisition, and used with an effect on our troops to which all will testify who were in the advance and witnessed it. Our troops were scattered. Army, division, brigade and even regimental organizations were broken up for the time to such an extent that any advance, at that hour of the day, in such order or masses as would have promised any substantial a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
ers. But we may without impropriety call attention to Colonel Roy's paper as a fine specimen of the style which should characterize papers on points of controversy between Confederates. Able, earnest and pointed in vindicating the name and fame of his loved and honored chief and trusted friend, Colonel Roy is at the same time corteous in his expressions and parliamentary in his whole article — setting an example which those who write on controverted points might well imitate. Major H. B. Mcclellan, so widely known and esteemed as the gallant and able Adjutant-General of the cavalry corps, Army of Northern Virginia; of Lexington, Kentucky, has accepted an invitation to address the Virginia Division, Army of Northern Virginia Association, at its next reunion in November. He has fitly chosen as his theme, The services and character of General J. E. B. Stuart. This theme, in the hands of the gallant soldier who rode at Stuart's side — the accomplished writer who has since been
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.70 (search)
hern Virginia Association. Address of Major H. B. McClellan, of Lexington, Ky., on the life, campaointed hour the orator of the evening, Major H. B. McClellan was escorted into the hall by the presto introduce as orator of the evening, Major H. B. Mcclellan, late A. A. G. of the Cavalry Corps A.62, Stuart prosecuted his famous ride around McClellan's army on the Chickahominy. I have in my poucted Jackson's corps over the same route to McClellan's rear, and on the 27th the crushing defeat nt that by it the confidence of the north in McClellan was shaken. In after days we became more acations by passing for the second time around McClellan's army as it lay on the banks of the Potomacg and checking a heavy force, believed to be McClellan's. God has shielded me thus far from bodily epair To dwell a weeping hermit there. Maj. McClellan took his seat amid loud applause, was warmthers of the old cavalry corps would greet Maj. McClellan's appreciative tribute to their loved and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A reminiscence of Sharpsburg. (search)
ing the third (Bee's) brigade of Hood's division, Army of Northern Virginia, has never, to his knowledge, been published, and is recorded here at the suggestion of a friend as an interesting reminiscence of the late war between the States, and as illustrative of the character of the beloved chieftain, the least incident of whose grand life is cherished by those brave men who for three years followed him on fields of glory, but to final defeat: In the early morning of September 17, 1862, McClellan opened the battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam) by an attack in force on our centre, just at the junction of Jackson and Longstreet's corps. Hood's division was the left of Longstreet's corps; the commander of Jackson's right is not known to the writer. At 11 o'clock on the previous night Hood, who had covered the retreat from South Mountain, was relieved by a brigade which had just joined the army and had seen but little real service. The attack was so heavy that these troops soon began to