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eard in the direction of Warrenton, beginning about 10 o'clock on Tuesday morning, and the supposition was that a general fight was progressing in that neighbor-hood, though nothing definite had reached Gordonsville with reference to it. The accepted conclusion was that the enemy had made a stand, and that a great battle was impending, if not in actual progress. Parties from Gordonsville as late as yesterday morning, state that it was reliably ascertained at that point on Monday, that McClellan, with 40,000 men, had arrived at Fredericksburg, and was attempting to join Pope, having come up in time to prevent Burnside's retreat from becoming a total rout. It is stated that the demoralization in the Yankee army is great, the officers fearing to enter up on a battle, lest they might be captured and subjected to the retaliatory treatment in store for them in that event and that the men, on account of the cowardice of the officers, swore that they would not fight, but would follo
The Confederate War operations. The campaign in Eastern Virginia for the last three months has been one of great energy and wall-proved sagacity. The operations before Richmond were certainly of a character to entitle an army and Generals to the highest honor; for enterprise, forecast, and heroism. The failure to capture a larger number of the invading army under McClellan is matter of criticism, but in no way affects the reputation of the army and its Commander-in-Chief. The settled opinion thus far, in the absence of official explanation, is that it was owing to failures to fulfill orders in proper time. But whether or no this be so, there is honor and glory enough in the grand triumphs won by our army in saving Richmond. With all proper expedition, after the enemy had escaped to the river and gunboats, a part of the noble army which had served so faithfully in the protection of Richmond repaired promptly to defend our country from another large invading force. What
ing of the cable across Chesapeake Bay, brought Gen. McClellan down the James in the afternoon, on his way to ing, when quite a crowd gathered at the wharf. Gen. McClellan was accompanied by Gen. Fitz John Porter, Quartived at the Eastern Shore between nine and ten. Gen. McClellan went ashore and spent several hours in sending s brief absence from the army is the first that Gen. McClellan has indulged in since he joined it. He is in exstimony of the Assistant Secretary of War, Tucker, McClellan had 120,000 men at Yorktown. Subsequently, Frankl8,000, Generals Meigs and Wadsworth testified that McClellan had all be asked for. Only nineteen regiments wereibility for Bal Bluff is divided between Stone and McClellan; yet Stone was sent to Fort Warren, while McClellaMcClellan has been suffered to hold in his hands the destinies of this great nation. It is known that the President said, on his return from James river, that McClellan could account for only half the men sent to him Of the 1
ior to the 5th of April, according to the testimony of the Assistant Secretary of War, Tucker, McClellan had 120,000 men at Yorktown. Subsequently, Franklin's division, 12,000; McCall's division, 10,000, were sent to him, making a total of 158,000, Generals Meigs and Wadsworth testified that McClellan had all be asked for. Only nineteen regiments were left to guard Washington. The correspondenf the Commercial telegraphs that the responsibility for Bal Bluff is divided between Stone and McClellan; yet Stone was sent to Fort Warren, while McClellan has been suffered to hold in his hands theMcClellan has been suffered to hold in his hands the destinies of this great nation. It is known that the President said, on his return from James river, that McClellan could account for only half the men sent to him Of the 158,000 brave men he hMcClellan could account for only half the men sent to him Of the 158,000 brave men he had upon the Peninsula only 85,000 were effective when the battles commenced, and when he finally landed on James river, only 60,000 could be mustered for active duty. Thus, from the time he landed a