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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 34. attack on Santa Rosa Island. October 9, 1861. (search)
uch is the fate of war, and we must expect, while often successful, to have the cup of victory dashed with the bitters of adversity. Yours truly, Georgia. The following extracts are from private letters received from the volunteers at Pensacola: We killed about one hundred of them, and lost heavily in killed and wounded on our side, but I do not know the exact number. We also took some thirty or forty prisoners. One of our men got three hundred and forty dollars in cash; William E. McCoy took a gun from one of the enemy; another took the Zouave Major's hat; others took coats, hats, caps, swords, a fine pair of navy pistols; one of our men captured a fine German-silver horn. Ben Bolt — son of Judge Bolt--is missing; we think he has been taken prisoner. The whole regiment was anxious to participate, and were about crossing over to the island this morning, when they met the expedition returning, and all came back together. M. We set out, and before daylight were lan
heir fires, unable to sleep in the rain upon the open ground, the greater part of the command, though most unwilling to give up the pursuit, felt that, if it was so ordered, it must be best for themselves, after their few hours' halt, (it could not be called rest,) to retrace their steps that very night, rather than remain standing in the cold and wet till morning, with only the prospect before them of their return. We accordingly commenced our return soon after one o'clock, and, reaching McCoy's about four, we rested till after six A. M. of the 15th, or to-day, when we moved onward, and, with a single rest about midway, the command reached this place soon after noon, being still in excellent spirits — their main disappointment being in not having been permitted to continue the pursuit of the rebels. We are at this hour partly in houses, but a great number out in the open air in the village, where it is now snowing upon them in their rest, which, added to their really great expo
sunderstood, please allow to me space for a brief explanation. In February, 1837, the day next succeeding that on which the votes for President and Vice-President had been counted, as I entered the Hall of the House of Representatives, I met Gen. McCoy, of North Carolina, who said to me: Why are you not in the room of the Committee of Claims? I inquired for what purpose ought I to be there? Gen. McCoy said: There is a meeting of all the members of the House from the slaveholding States. WiGen. McCoy said: There is a meeting of all the members of the House from the slaveholding States. Without knowing by whom or for what purpose the meeting had been called, I proposed to go and hear what was to be done. When we entered the room together, we found from sixty to seventy members present, Gen. Chambers, of Kentucky, being in the chair, and Mr. Harrison, of Missouri, acting as Secretary. Gov. Pickens was speaking, and was urging the adoption of a resolution which had been submitted. Soon after he closed his remarks, I made inquiry of the Chair as to the object of the meeting, when