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William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 5 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 5, 1863., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 2 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for McCoy or search for McCoy in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
was hurried to its support, and in that movement a volley of musketry, given at close quarters by the Eighty-third Pennsylvania, The Eighty-third Pennsylvania swept close by the Confederate flank in its advance to the support of Griffin, when McCoy suddenly wheeled his forward companies into line, and delivered the fatal volley. One of the men caught General Brown by the collar, and dragged him into Warren's lines. Lieutenant-Colonel McCoy, on the flank and rear of the Confederates, threw Lieutenant-Colonel McCoy, on the flank and rear of the Confederates, threw them into utter disorder, and caused. their rout, with a loss of their leader and almost a thousand men made prisoners. In this encounter Warren lost three hundred and fifty men. He then proceeded to establish a line and intrench it, without further resistance. Hancock, in the mean time, had been preparing to force, a passage of the stream at Chesterfield bridge, where he was confronted by McLaws's division of Longstreet's corps. These troops were mostly on the south side of the river, but
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
their nakedness, with little or no food, and without means of procuring it. A more forlorn, neglected set of human beings I never saw. --Story of the Great March, page 58. excepting near Macon, and no serious obstacle, excepting such as wretched roads presented. Each Wing had its separate pontoon train; and during the march to the sea, Sherman accompanied first one wing, and then the other, with his personal staff of only five officers, none of them above the rank of major. These were Major McCoy, aid-de-camp; Captain Audenried, aid-de-camp; Major Hitchcock, assistant. adjutant-general; Captain Dayton, aid-de-camp, and Captain Nichols, aid-de-camp. Attached to his Headquarters, says Brevet-Major G. W. Nichols, in his Story of the Great March, but not technically members of his staff, were the chiefs of the separate departments for the Military Division of the Mississippi. These were General Barry, chief of artillery; Lieutenant-Colonel Ewing, inspector-general; Captain Poe, chi