Your search returned 16 results in 9 document sections:

uished himself by the daring exploit of capturing Castillo, in Nicaragua, with forty-eight men, after Lockridge and Titus had failed with eight hundred--Capt. Imboden's, Capt. Lewis's, and Capt. Crane's University company were the companies engaged, with one six-pounder and one howitzer, under Major Gibbs, of South Carolina, Capt. McComas and Lieut. Pairo, of Richmond. The casualties were but trifling on our side, though we have to regret the death of Lieut. Howell, of Mississippi, (of Capt. McDonnell's company,) and that of one of Capt. Imboden's gallant rangers. Capt. Lewis was shot through the breast, but is doing well. Three privates were wounded in the above-named companies, one very severely. The only loss in the artillery was Lieut. Pairo's horse, shot under him. The enemy was obviously only feeling for the flanks of our position, and evidently could make nothing of it, and no wonder, as Prof. Snead remarked, since it has no flanks at all. The guns were only advanced to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), St. Regis, skirmish at (search)
St. Regis, skirmish at On each side of the boundary-line between the United States and Canada is the Indian village of St. Regis, at the mouth of the St. Regis River. In that village Captain McDonnell was placed, with some armed Canadian voyageurs, in September, 1812. Maj. G. D. Young, stationed at French Mills (afterwards Fort Covington), left that post on the night of Oct. 21 with about 200 men, crossed the St. Regis in a boat, a canoe, and on a hastily constructed raft, and before dawn was within half a mile of St. Regis. There they were rested and refreshed, and soon afterwards pushed forward and surrounded the town. Assailing the block-house, a sharp skirmish ensued, in which the British lost seven men killed, while not an American was hurt. The spoils of victory were forty prisoners (exclusive of the commander and the Roman Catholic priest), with their arms and accoutrements, thirty-eight muskets, two bateaux, a flag, and a quantity of baggage, including 800 blankets.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
64. McDermott, Michael, priv., (H), July 28, ‘63; 22; sub.; deserted Nov. 18, ‘63; from Hosp. at Alexandria. McDonald, Angus, priv., (B), Jan. 7, ‘64; 30; deserted Mar. 1, ‘65. McDonald, Charles, priv., (C), Mar. 21, ‘64; 21; wounded May 12, ‘64; abs. wounded since May ‘64 McDonald, John, 1st, priv., (F), July 30, 1863; 22; sub.; transf. to 20 M. V. Jan. 14, 1864. McDonald, John, 2nd, priv., (H), Aug. 1, 1863; 20; sub.; transf. to Provost Marshall 3 Div. 2nd Army corps as deserter. McDonnell, Benj. M., priv., (A), Mar. 29, ‘64; 31; wounded May 12, ‘64; since died. McDowell, Samuel, priv., (F), June 10, ‘64; 28; sub. Thos. Dana; M. O. June 30, ‘65. McDowell, Thos., priv., (B), Aug. 30, ‘62; 42; disch. Dec. 13, ‘62. McDuncon, John, priv., (F), Aug. I, ‘63; 21; sub.; transf. to 20 M. V. Jan. 14, ‘64. McDougal, Wm., Jr., priv., (D), Aug. 23, 1864; 21; N. F.R. McFeely, Wm., priv., (E), Aug. 27, ‘61; 43; disch. disa. Mar. 6, ‘63. McFarland, Andrew
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
ar Dec. 4, ‘62, to rank Aug. 23, ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, 4th Tennessee Regiment. Oct. 31, ‘63, 4th Confederate Tennessee. McKEAIG, Samuel A., Assistant Surgeon. Dec. 24, ‘62, ordered to report to Gen. Wheeler. Died March 12, ‘63, near Shelbyville, Tenn. McGEE, J. P., Assistant Surgeon (promoted), appointed Surgeon by Secretary of War to rank 26th May ‘63, com'd Oct. 1, ‘61. Jan. 31, ‘63, Exam. Conscripts, Shelbyville. Feb. 18, ‘63, Division Hospital. Feb. 29, ‘64, Division Hospital. McDonnell, Geo. A., Assistant Surgeon. Passed Board Aug. 20, ‘63. Dec. 31, ‘62, Winchester Hospital, June 13, ‘63, resignation accepted. Meroney, W. L., contract $100, made by J. P. Logan, Feb. 15, ‘63. Feb. 28, ‘63, Ambulance Train. McElheny, Jas. P., contract made by Surgeon R. L. Butt, March, 1863. March 31, ‘63, White's Battalion Cavalry. McEnery, Henry O'Neal, Surgeon. Aug, 31, 1863, 4th Louisiana Battalion. Merrett, F. D., Assistant Surgeon. Sept. 30, 1
Drowned. --A brakesman on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, named McDonnell was drowned about 3 o'clock, Monday morning, in Harris' Creek, in Amherst co., Va., near where it empties into James River. The unfortunate man was on his way from his boarding-house, to the turning table near by, and in crossing the bridge which spans the creek, lost his way, it being very dark, and fell in, and not being able to swim, soon drowned. A fellow workman was near by at the time, but a pitchy darknay morning, in Harris' Creek, in Amherst co., Va., near where it empties into James River. The unfortunate man was on his way from his boarding-house, to the turning table near by, and in crossing the bridge which spans the creek, lost his way, it being very dark, and fell in, and not being able to swim, soon drowned. A fellow workman was near by at the time, but a pitchy darkness prevailing, was unable to render any assistance. McDonnell was about 24 years of age, and was from Alexandria.
An Epic Poem,in fear Lincs — Inscribed to the great Oark-Taker.by Esperanza McDonnell was busy all Saturday night Expanding wings to the left and the right Till by Sunday ing, before it was light He was really to st on a dence of a fright.
erson, who distinguished himself by the daring exploit of capturing Castillo in Nicaragua, with 45 men, after Lockbridge and Titus had failed with 800.) Capt. Imboden's, Capt. Lewis's, and Capt. Crane's University company were the companies engaged, with one six-pounder and one howitzer, under Major Gibbes, of South Carolina, Capt. McComas and Lieut. Pairo, of Richmond. The casualties were trifling on our side, though we have to regret the death of Lieut. Howell, of Mississippi, of Capt. McDonnell's company, and that of one of Capt. Imboden's gallant Rangers. Captain Lewis was shot through the breast, but is doing well. Three privates were wounded in the above named companies, one very severely. The only loss in the artillery was Lieut. Pairo's horse shot from under him. The enemy was obviously only feeling for the flanks of our position and evidently could make nothing of it, and "no wonder," as Prof. Shead remarked, "since it has no flanks at all." The guns were only advance
of the 5th, came over from Fort Pickens last night, and was taken to the yard this morning. He says on the night of the burning of the "Judah" we killed four and wounded nine of the Federal party. He reports seventeen hundred men on the Island, and two hundred and fifty on the sick list. We did not learn how he effected his escape. A correspondent of the Observer records an interesting event as follows: "There was born in Pensacola, on the evening of the 3d inst., a son to Maj. McDonnell, of the 1st Regiment of Florida Volunteers. "This young recruit being the first male born to our forces withing the lines of this military occupation, will bear the honored name of his brave Commander-in-Chief, so justly celebrated for a 'little more grape.' "We hail with pleasure the advent of this juvenile warrior, and bespeak for him a long life of usefulness to his country, and acquisitions of fresh laurels to adorn the name around which so many blushing honors cluster."
's brigade had reached there, and Gen. Abercrombie was on the road with his brigade. Gen. Williams' brigade takes up the line of march for Frederick and its vicinity this morning. We have information from Winchester, Va., that the Confederate forces there under Jackson (some 5,000 strong) have been considerably alarmed, dreading an attack, and that they are disinclined to make a stand there, but had prepared to fall back towards Strasburg. It is reported that Generals Carson and McDonnell have been deposed for allowing Kelly to whip them at Romney. Reports of deserters from the rebel Camp. The New York Herald, of the 4th inst., publishes the following from its special Washington telegraphic correspondent, dated December 3d: This morning General McCall sent to the headquarters of General Porter, Provost Marshal, two deserters from the rebel army, named Wm. McDonald and John Worsdall. The first is an English boy, twenty years old; the second is a Scotch lad, n