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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 116 0 Browse Search
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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
y of peace was signed, February, 1848. The following served with the army in Mexico under Generals Taylor and Scott and afterward became conspicuous in the Civil War and are subsequently mentioned. United States army George A. McCall, assistant adjutant-general, afterward commanded the Pennsylvania Reserves in the Federal Army of the Potomac. Joseph Hooker, assistant adjutant-general, afterward commanded the Army of the Potomac at the battle of Chancellorsville, May, 1863. Irvin W. McDowell, assistant adjutant-general, afterward commanded the Federal forces at the first battle of Bull Run, July, 1861. Robert E. Lee, captain Engineer Corps, afterward commander-in-chief Confederate States Army, and commanded the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia at the battle of Gettysburg, July, 1863. P. G. T. Beauregard, first lieutenant Engineer Corps, afterward commanded the Confederate forces at the battle of Shiloh, April, 1862. George B. McClellan, second lieutenant Engi
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
rmee, to be commanded respectively by Sumner, McDowell, Heintzelman and Keyes. Into which of these t now that the enmity of Heintzelman, Sumner, McDowell and Keyes can all be traced to this very caus Point in the firm belief and dependence that McDowell and his corps of forty thousand men would go ck, assigning Banks to the command of one and McDowell to the other. Thus McClellan, at a blow, is ack to McClellan. As this was a checkmate to McDowell, he has started off to Washington, and we noweasonable to infer this is the one designed. McDowell has not yet returned from his trip to Acquia ith deep regret by all those who knew him. McDowell has his headquarters back at Acquia Creek Stae to hasten the opening of communication with McDowell. I must do the latter the justice to say thal I can learn, the force sent from here under McDowell was not as rapid in its movements as it mightred to Porter's corps, and that both Pope and McDowell are relieved of their commands. Everything i[44 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 6 (search)
ery healthy or proper state of feeling, but I say it exists, and is due, I believe, in a great measure, to a want of confidence in the integrity and patriotism of party leaders. Headquarters army of the Potomac, October 13, 1864. I undoubtedly do not occupy the position I did just after the battle of Gettysburg, and no one will retain any such position in this country, unless he continues to be successful; but when you compare my position with my numerous predecessors, McClellan, Pope, McDowell, Burnside, Hooker, Rosecrans, Banks, Sigel and many others, I think you will admit that my retaining command, and the hold I have at present, is even more creditable than the exaggerated laudation immediately succeeding Gettysburg. Recollect, also, that most persistent efforts have been made by influential men, politicians and generals, to destroy me, without success; and I think you will find reason to be grateful and satisfied, even though you should desire to see more justice done. I d
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 7 (search)
rvice ended, the congregation rose, while the coffin was borne from the church, followed by the male relations of the general, his intimate personal friends, the President of the United States, the general of the army, and many other distinguished officers both of the army and navy. It was placed, covered with the national flag, upon the caisson upon which it was to be transported. The funeral escort, consisting of regular troops and the national guard of Pennsylvania, commanded by Major-General McDowell, closed around the caisson, which was followed by General Meade's faithful old horse, Baldy, who had carried him through many a hard-fought field, and by a long line of carriages containing his male relations, personal friends, officers of the general, State and city governments, and took up the line of march for Laurel Hill, through a city in which business was suspended, the public offices closed, and many private residences draped in mourning. Impressive as the services in Sai
, 280, 281, 284-289, 292-297, 302, 312, 328, 355. McCall, Meta, II, 267. McCandless, Wm., II, 87, 100. McClellan, Geo. B., I, 196, 216, 217, 219-222, 226, 229, 232, 233, 235, 236, 238, 239, 241, 242, 246-248, 250, 251, 253-260, 263-277, 282-284, 297, 299, 302-306, 307-312, 314-321, 325-327, 330, 332, 335, 345, 356, 372, 375, 386, 388; II, 136, 161, 162, 188, 232, 234, 239, 242, 312, 321, 366, 367, 399, 421. McClelland, John, I, 177. McDougall, A. L., II, 98, 101, 102. McDowell, Irvin W., I, 196, 250, 251, 253-257, 259-265, 267-273, 276, 278, 307-309, 319, 344, 346; II, 234, 304. McEuen, Dr., II, 248, 268. McGilvery, Freeman, II, 79, 80, 85, 87, 88, 100. McGrath, Mr., II, 233. McIntosh, John B., II, 124, 130. McKavett, Capt., I, 134. McKenzie, Mr., II, 128. McKenzie, A. Slidell, I, 116. McLane, Rebecca, I, 149. McLane, Robt., I, 155, 156. McLaws, Lafayette, I, 196; II, 26, 60, 69, 80, 81, 85, 100, 124. McLeod, I, 97. McNeill, Hugh W.