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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 204 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 144 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 113 11 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 93 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 73 3 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 60 12 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 60 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 55 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 51 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 42 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for McDowell or search for McDowell in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 5: Baltimore and Fortress Monroe. (search)
1864. Within a few days preceding Sunday, the 5th day of May, I was called to Washington upon two occasions, each of which fortuitously resulted in a consultation with General Scott. On the first of these occasions I reached Washington quite early in the morning, and as I could not see General Scott until eleven o'clock, I called upon the Secretary of the Treasury, Mr. Chase, at his office in the department. I found him busily engaged in studying a map of Virginia in company with Major McDowell. Chase said to me :-- Look here, General, I want your attention to this matter, pointing to the map. Here is Manassas Junction, where there is the junction of the system of railroads which must bring the rebels together to make an attack upon Washington. I think that junction should be taken and held by us. After studying the matter carefully for some little time, I said:-- Yes, I think there is the spot which should be fortified and held in order to protect Washington. The C
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
mmand; and as he wished to go out in a blaze of glory, he consented to it. It is but fair to McDowell to say that he was reluctant to fight the battle. But he was urged on to fight it, as is shownd to be, and like schoolboys they were notching the days on a stick when they would go home. McDowell was a captain three months before. He had had no experience in fighting troops. He was a bravprises; they will run at nothing and be surprised at everything. And that was the condition of McDowell's army as far as the three months men were concerned, and none but the regulars had been in thend that he and all his army got down to Bull Run on the night of the 19th, and were in front of McDowell on the 20th; and so far from Joe Johnston's men coming into the action late on the 21st, and oun before him, when there had been less than nine thousand, and they had gone down to operate on McDowell's right. The battle of Bull Run illustrates every vice, weakness, and incapacity of officers
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 13: occupations in 1863; exchange of prisoners. (search)
twelve colors, lots of prisoners, and all this was done with so little loss on our side, ten killed, thirty-five wounded. McClellan's letter, July 21. His story, page 62. Bull Run was fought between the Confederate army with about thirty-five thousand men, of whom three hundred and eighty-seven were killed and eighteen hundred and fifty-two wounded, and the Union army of about thirty thousand men, of whom four hundred and eighty-one were killed, and a thousand and upward wounded. McDowell was not censured for any action of his in the loss of that battle. He had been in command of his army three months. McClellan had been in command of his brigade twenty days. Contrast the experience of the two generals. McClellan, the second day afterwards,was sent for from Washington, and on the sixth day after that was put in command of all the forces which could be brought to defend the capital. Let McClellan from his own book tell his own story of how he was received:-- . . . I f
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 18: why I was relieved from command. (search)
and very few of them got to be captains before they were fifty years old, and except against the Indians they never acquired any experience in the field. The lowest rank was to be a lieutenant of cavalry. So, with the exception of the Mexican veterans, there were no West Pointers at the breaking out of the war who had had any experience in the field. But during the Rebellion all was changed. It was assumed that West Point officers knew the whole art of war and were ready-made generals. McDowell was only a major in the regular army when he fought the first battle of Bull Run, and had had no experience with troops. A few — but not too many — of those officers read military books. It is wonderful how soon this claim of theirs burst out after the war commenced, and even then how little ambition for fighting these men had. I was sent as major-general commanding to Fortress Monroe on the 22d of May, 1861, and I was told by General Scott that I was fortunate in having there some six
, 714, 715, 716, 841; August Belmont offers to bet on, 761; upon Halleck, 871-872; Buel reports to, 872; despatches between Halleck and, 872-873; sends despatches to Grant, 874; reference to, 893. McCLELLAN'S Own Story, editor of quoted on Halleck, 872. McCABE, Capt., Gordon, quoted upon attack on Petersburg, 701, 702, 703. McCAFFERTY, Hon. M. J., appointed Judge, 975. McCLERNAND, General, letter from Halleck, 460. McCULLOCH, Secretary, financial theories of, 938-939. McDOWELL, General, inexperience previous to Bull Run, 290; inexperience of, 571; reference to, 863. McMILLAN, Colonel, 461; regarded as an able commander, 531. McPHEETUS, Colonel, 496. Meade, General, reference to, 621, 683, 700; letter from Grant to, 636; despatch from, describing attack on Petersburg, 705; reference to, 715-738; order from Grant, 827; orders not obeyed at Petersburg, 831; ordered to Burksville, 876; mentioned for major-general, 878; reference to, 901. Meigs, General, aids Bu