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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 29 (search)
ion. He will resist it. A Mrs. Alien, a lady of wealth here, has been arrested for giving information to the enemy. Her letters were intercepted. She is confined at the asylum St. Francis de Sales. The surgeon who attends there reports to-day that her mental excitement will probably drive her to madness. Her great fear seems to be that she will be soon sent to a common prison. There is much indignation that she should be assigned to such comfortable quartersand I believe the Bishop (McGill) protests against having criminals imprisoned in his religious edifices. It is said she has long been sending treasonable letters to Baltimore — but the authorities do not have the names of her letter-carriers published. No doubt they had passports. A letter from Lee's army says we lost 10,000 in the recent battle, killed, wounded, and prisoners. We took 11,000 prisoners and 11 guns. Thank Heaven I we have fine weather after nearly a month's rain. It may be that we shall have bet
eneral Crittenden was to leave Van Cleve's division of the Twenty-first army corps at Murfreesboro, concentrate at Bradyville with the other two, and await orders. The cavalry, one brigade under General Turchin, was sent with the Twenty-first army corps to look out toward McMinnville. All the remainder under Major-General Stanley, were to meet General Mitchell coming in from Versailles, and attack the rebel cavalry at Middleton. The headquarters of the army was to be established at Mrs. McGill's, at Big Spring branch. All these movements were executed with commendable promptitude and success in the midst of a continuous and drenching rain, which so softened the ground on all the dirt roads as to render them next to impassable. General McCook's taking of Liberty Gap was very gallant and creditable to the troops of Johnson's division, Willich's brigade leading, supported by Carlin's brigade of Davis's division on the right. General Reynolds had the advance in the Fourtee
Doc. 31.-Governor McGill's proclamation. The following is the first response from Washington Territory to the President's proclamation for troops:-- Whereas, the President of the United States has issued his proclamation, stating that the laws of the United States have been and now are opposed in several States by combinations too powerful to be suppressed in the ordinary way, and therefore calling for the militia of the several States, now, therefore, deeming it expedient that the militia of the Territory of washington should be placed in readiness to meet any requisition from the President of the United States, or the Governor of this Territory, to aid in maintaining the laws and integrity of the national Union, I do hereby call upon all the citizens of this Territory capable of bearing arms, and liable to militia duty, to report immediately to the Adjutant-General of the Territory, and proceed at once to organize themselves into companies, and elect their own officers,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
guns of Walker's artillery when we were fighting the assaulting column. The infantry fire in our rear was for a short time more severe than that in front, as Mahone's brigade poured such a fire into us that Lieutenant-Colonel Cowan and Lieutenant-Colonel McGill had to rush back and ask them not to fire into friends. What induced these brave Virginians to fire upon us I have never been able to learn. After my brigade captured the battery of six guns, which we were unable to bring off for tholdier in camp and on the march, as well as in battle. In the flank movement my brigade capturedthree flags and a large number of prisoners — supposed to be about four hundred--notwithstanding, General Mahone said, in the presence of Lieutenant-Colonel McGill, that afternoon, that the d — d North Carolinians were deserting his brave Virginians. First Lieutenant James Grimsley, Company K, Thirty-seventh regiment, with a small squad of men, had the honor of capturing the colors of the Seven
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.45 (search)
nted infantry. Although my command was on the field, and in proper position, it did not become very actively engaged. After nightfall I was ordered by General Kershaw to march across the fields on the left of the valley until I came to the road, and there to halt and report. I came into the road just at McGill's house, where I halted and reported as ordered, and soon afterwards was directed to establish pickets in my front, and go into camp with the rest of the brigade. Near the house of McGill I captured several inferior horses, saddles and bridles, enough bacon and crackers to ration my command for about two or three days, besides other articles of inconsiderable value. On the morning of the 18th, by order, I assumed command of the brigade, but as nothing special occurred after that date, I may complete the report of the operations of the command by saying that it remained at Bean station until the 20th December, when we took up the line of march for this point, which we reach
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
the enemy, a flank, rear and front fire from artillery, besides being in danger of our own guns playing upon the enemy; and as you have stated that you saw that a part of the North Carolina brigade had given way, I will here say that General Lane, in his report, dated 16th September, 1864, makes the following statement: The infantry fire in our rear was for a short time more severe than that in front, as Mahone's brigade poured such a fire into us that Lieutenant-Colonel Cowan and Lieutenant-Colonel McGill had to rush back and ask them not to fire into us. And he further says: My brigade continued to fight the enemy until the heads of two parallel lines of the enemy, which were coming from Ewell's front, were in skirmishing distance of us, and as I could see no indications of an intention on the part of Colonel Weisiger to comply with my request, I ordered my command to fall back, which was necessarily done in some confusion, as the line had been broken capturing prisoners, and the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
h. Nevertheless, it was a good substantial dinner; we had our expensive Confederate turkey, and vegatables and game, and good bread, made at home, and nice dessert. We had Mr. Stephens and General Sparrow, and Mr. Garland from our home, and Bishop McGill and dear old Father Hubert to dine with us. I shall never forget that New Year's dinner. We all tried to be gay, but our hearts were inwardly sad. There was the usual visiting, customary in those days on New Year's day, but the old brilliancew year's dinner, said Mrs. Semmes, and she took from an old scrap-book, carefully put away, an autograph letter from Mr. Stephens, dated New Year's, 1866. My dear Mrs. Semmes: Two years ago to-day we were at your house, in Richmond, and had Bishop McGill at dinner. What changes have taken place since then, and what reminiscences crowd upon my mind in taking this short retrospect. A whole train of these mixed with many pleasant as well as sad memories was awakened by your letter, which lies
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
command, and with them built a commodious and beautiful church. The roof was of tent flies, and there was a big fireplace at each side, but they had gallery and choir loft, and services every Sunday. She went to Richmond and procured from Bishop McGill, Roman Catholic Bishop of Virginia, the service of a priest, who regularly celebrated Holy Mass once a month, a large per cent. of the command being Roman Catholics from southern Maryland, and the other Sundays services were held by the chaps Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colonel Turner closes his report with: My investigation and the disclosures made prove (undoubtingly to m
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
e, John Waters; is lame in the knee; works in a brick-yard near Cold Spring, on Long Island, &c. John H. Patten—true name, Peter Stevens; lives at Nyack, near Piermont, on the North river; is now a justice of the peace there. Sarah Douglass and Miss Knapp—the true name of one is Dunham, who is the wife of Conover, the name of the other is Mrs. Charles Smythe; she is the sister or sister-in-law of Conover, and lives at Cold Spring, Long Island; her husband is a clerk on Blackwell's Island. McGill—his name is Neally; he is a licensed pedler in New York, and sometimes drives a one-horse cart. After so ably completing his work, Colonel Turner closes his report with: My investigation and the disclosures made prove (undoubtingly to my mind) that the depositions made by Campbell, Snevel, Wright, Patten, Mrs. Douglass, and others, are false; that they are cunningly devised, diabolical fabrications of Conover, verified by his suborned and perjured accomplices. This practically <
St. Patrick's Church. --This new Roman Catholic Church, on Church Hill, was consecrated by Bishop McGill on Sunday morning last, in the presence of a large crowd, among whom was the Young Catholic Friends' Society. The services were of a highly impressive character. The sermon was preached by the Rev. Mr. Jacobs, of the Redemptorist Brothers. from the text: "Thou art Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of Hell shall not prevail against it. "
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