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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Borgne, Lake, battle on. (search)
t. Thomas Ap Catesby Jones with five gunboats,. a tender, and a despatch-boat, to watch for the enemy. Jones sent Lieutenant McKeever with two gunboats to the entrance of Mobile Bay for intelligence. McKeever discovered the British fleet on Dec. 1McKeever discovered the British fleet on Dec. 10. and hastened back with the news. In the afternoon of the same day the fleet appeared near the entrance to Lake Borgne, and Jones hastened with his flotilla towards Pass Christian, where he anchored, and waited the approach of the invaders to dise, and formed in a long, straight line. Jones reserved his fire until the invaders were within close ritle range. Then McKeever hurled a 32-pound ball over the water and a shower of grapeshot, which broke the British line and made great confusion. killed and wounded. The Americans lost six men killed and thirty-five wounded. Among the latter were Lieutenants Jones, McKeever, Parker, and Speddon. The British commander, Locker, was severely wounded: so, also, was Lieutenant Pratt, the officer
f the city to-night. William F. Rogers, Captain P. M., 30th District. Mr. Wheeler to Secretary Stanton.—(telegram.) Malone, October 31, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton: We have a village of over three thousand inhabitants, ten miles from the Canada line; principal shops of Ogdensburg road here; we will take care of ourselves, if you will give us arms and ammunition. The fire-arms under the control of the provost-marshal here are worthless. Will you give him arms for our use? Refer to Major McKeever, in your department, Governor Morton, or Treasurer Spinner. Respectfully, W. H. Wheeler. Mr. Jackson to Secretary Seward.—(telegram.) Halifax, N. S., November 1, 1864. Hon. W. H. Seward, Secretary of State: It is secretly asserted by secessionists here, that plans have been formed and will be carried into execution by rebels and their allies, for setting fire to the principal cities in the Northern states on the day of the presidential election. M. M. Jackson, United States
f the city to-night. William F. Rogers, Captain P. M., 30th District. Mr. Wheeler to Secretary Stanton.—(telegram.) Malone, October 31, 1864. Hon. E. M. Stanton: We have a village of over three thousand inhabitants, ten miles from the Canada line; principal shops of Ogdensburg road here; we will take care of ourselves, if you will give us arms and ammunition. The fire-arms under the control of the provost-marshal here are worthless. Will you give him arms for our use? Refer to Major McKeever, in your department, Governor Morton, or Treasurer Spinner. Respectfully, W. H. Wheeler. Mr. Jackson to Secretary Seward.—(telegram.) Halifax, N. S., November 1, 1864. Hon. W. H. Seward, Secretary of State: It is secretly asserted by secessionists here, that plans have been formed and will be carried into execution by rebels and their allies, for setting fire to the principal cities in the Northern states on the day of the presidential election. M. M. Jackson, United States
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
was retreating southeastward, and vigorously harassed his rear-guard. But the Federals soon encountered the principal corps firmly established at Fredericktown, and, being unable to dislodge, it withdrew after a brisk discharge of musketry. The position of Carlin was becoming perilous. Fremont, who had quitted the Sedalia Railway to place himself at the head of his columns, was far from any telegraphic station, and could not be consulted. Fortunately, his assistant adjutant-general, Captain McKeever, had remained at St. Louis in the exercise of all his powers. He immediately adopted effective measures for keeping Thompson in check. Two regiments of infantry, with a battery of artillery, under Major Schofield, were sent to the relief of Carlin; notwithstanding the destruction of the bridge, these reinforcements soon joined him, and he was enabled to place himself at their head and attack Thompson at once. In the mean time, Grant was increasing the garrison at Cape Girardeau, and
Insurance!Life and Fire, as usual,upon the most advantageous terms, byC. R. Bricken. M. D.,established since 1850. Slaves Insured for for one month. one year, or five years, at the lowest rates. The best Companies represented, and all losses, as heretofore, promptly paid C. R. Bricken, Gen'l Ins. Agent. No. 4 under Exchange Hotel, Pearl st. at McKeever & Bricken's. ja 10--1t*
5th Ala., Capt. Homer's J. R. Cox, Ga., or Miss. R., Capt. Rhodes's H. C. Jones, Ga. or Miss. R., Capt. Rhodes's J. M. L. Jones, Ga. or Miss. R., Capt. Rhodes's John Mahoney, 1st Fla., Capt. Cripp's Larkin Nickles, 1st Fla., Capt. Cripp's Benj. F. Parker, 1st Fla., Capt. Baker's; T. Bond, 1st Fla.; R. L. Hale, 1st Fla.;C. F. Hollyman, 1st Fla.; John Jarvis, 1st Fla.; J. J. H. Patterson, 1st Fla.; S. Yager Finley, 1st Fla.; Wm. Mauldin, 10th Miss., Capt.Peake's; H. Destringer, 10th Miss, Capt. McKeever's; Daniel Jones, La. Infy; Frank Passent, La. infy; G. W. Clark, Ga. or Miss. R., severely wounded; Everett, dead; John Godley, Fla. One man dead on the Island — unknown. We have learned that our prisoners all sailed on the 16th, we know not where, but probably for New York or the Tortugas. The wounded and sick in our hospitals are all slowly but gradually improving. The ladies are ceaseless in their efforts to reader endurable their misfortunes by battle and camp. The ol
s which have been published, one would hardly recognize in them the same engagements. True to their old rule, they still continue to lie themselves into victories, no matter how often or how complete their defeats. The Times's report has the following: Brilliant charge of General Fremont's body Guard upon two thousand rebels. St. Louis, Oct. 27.--The following dispatch was received here this evening: Headquarters, in the Field, Near Harmansville, Mo., Saturday, Oct. 26. Capt. McKeever, Asst Adj't Gen'l: Yesterday afternoon, Maj. Seagoyne, at the head of my guard, made a most brilliant charge upon a body of the enemy, drawn up in line of battle, at their camp at Springfield, 2,000 or 2,200 strong. He completely routed them, cleared them from the town, hoisted the National flag on the court-house, and retired upon a reinforcement, which he has already joined. Our loss is not great. This successful charge against such a very large odds is a noble example to t
olm Mosely, Fifth Florida Regiment; L. G. Moore, F. M. Fry, Henry Ferguson, (dead,) Seventh Alabama Regiment; John Burgess, Fifth Alabama Regiment; Mobile Continentals, Captain Homer; J. R. Cox, H. C. Jones J. M. L. Jones, Georgia and Mississippi Regiments, Capt. Rhodes; John Mahony, Largin Nichols, Benjamin F. Parker, Captain H. H. Baker, S. Yerger Finley T. Bond R. L. Hale, C. F. Hollyman, John Jarvis, Joshua J. H. Patterson, First Florida Regiment, Capt. Cropp; Wm. Mauldin, H. Deshinger, McKeever, Tenth Mississippi Regiment, Capt. Peake; Daniel Jones, Frank Peasant, Louisiana Infantry; G. W. Clark, severely wounded. --Everett, (dead since,) Georgia and Mississippi Regiment; John Godley, Florida Regiment. Letter from a Yankee Colonel. Reference has been made in this paper to a breach of the treaty between Col. McGuirk, of the Seventeenth Mississippi, and Col. Vaughn, of the Federal army, in respect to the burial of the dead, and the apology which was afterwards sent. The f