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he same hat that he waved to rally his soldiers on that famous ride from Winchester, twenty miles away. As he reined up his panting horse on the turnpike at Cedar Creek, he received salutes from two future Presidents of the United States. The position on the left of the road was held by Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes, who had succeeded, after the rout of the Eighth Corps in the darkness of the early morning, in rallying some fighting groups of his own brigade; while on the right stood Major William McKinley, gallantly commanding the remnant of his fighting regiment — the Twenty-sixth Ohio. crumbling lines. The Nineteenth Corps, under Emory, tried to hold its ground; for a time it fought alone, but after a desperate effort to hold its own, it, too, melted away under the scorching fire. The fields to the rear of the army were covered with wagons, ambulances, stragglers, and fleeing soldiers. The Sixth Corps now came to the rescue. As it slowly fell to the rear it would, at times,
he same hat that he waved to rally his soldiers on that famous ride from Winchester, twenty miles away. As he reined up his panting horse on the turnpike at Cedar Creek, he received salutes from two future Presidents of the United States. The position on the left of the road was held by Colonel Rutherford B. Hayes, who had succeeded, after the rout of the Eighth Corps in the darkness of the early morning, in rallying some fighting groups of his own brigade; while on the right stood Major William McKinley, gallantly commanding the remnant of his fighting regiment — the Twenty-sixth Ohio. crumbling lines. The Nineteenth Corps, under Emory, tried to hold its ground; for a time it fought alone, but after a desperate effort to hold its own, it, too, melted away under the scorching fire. The fields to the rear of the army were covered with wagons, ambulances, stragglers, and fleeing soldiers. The Sixth Corps now came to the rescue. As it slowly fell to the rear it would, at times,
, Simmons, Drillard, Ducat, Barnett, Goddard, Rosecrans, Garfield, Porter, Bond, Thompson, Sheridan. War-time portraits of six soldiers whose military records assisted them to the Presidential Chair. Brig.-Gen. Andrew Johnson President, 1865-69. General Ulysses S. Grant, President, 1869-77. Bvt. Maj.-Gen. Rutherford B. Hayes President, 1877-81. Maj.-Gen. James A. Garfield President, March to September, 1881. Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Benjamin Harrison President, 1889-93. Brevet Major William McKinley, President, 1897-1901. many cases between fighters and non-combatants. This is true, even when the latter are represented in full army overcoats, with swords and the like, as was customary to some extent with postmasters, quartermasters, commissariat and hospital attendants. The features are distinctive of the men who have stood up under fire, and undergone the even severer ordeal of submission to a will working for the common good, involving the sacrifice of personal indepe
the strewing of flowers, in 1867, by Southern women at Columbus, Mississippi, on the graves of Union soldiers, which brought from a Northern man that beautiful poem, The Blue and the Gray, and a thousand similar incidents, have resulted in those acts that passed in Congress by unanimous votes, one providing for a Confederate section in Arlington Cemetery, the other looking to the care of the Confederate dead at Arlington and around the Federal prisons in the North. Presidents Cleveland, McKinley, Roosevelt, and Taft have each and all, by deeds and words, had their full share in the work of perfect reunion. And all over the land there are monuments to the dead of the Civil War, bearing inscriptions that will outlast the marble and bronze upon which they are written. Such is the legend on the monument built by the State of Pennsylvania to its dead at Vicksburg, here brothers fought for their principles, here heroes died to save their country, and a united people will forever cheris
ender, replacing Wade Hampton, who went to the Army of Tennessee. From 1886 to 1890 he was governor of Virginia, and, under appointment of President Cleveland, consul-general at Havana from 1896 to the outbreak of the Spanish-American War. President McKinley appointed him major-general of volunteers in 1898 and placed him at the head of the Seventh Army Corps. He was made military governor of Havana in 1899. Later, he commanded the Department of the Missouri. He received the rank of brigadienator from South Carolina from 1877 to 1889. At the outbreak of the Spanish War he was made a major-general of volunteers, May 28, 1898, and served until honorably discharged, April 15, 1899. He was a member of the commission appointed by President McKinley to arrange for the evacuation of Cuba by the Spaniards. General Butler died at Columbus, S. C., April 14, 1909. Major-General William Mahone was born at Monroe, Southampton County, Virginia, December 1, 1826. Graduating from the Vi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aguinaldo, Emilio, 1870- (search)
followed up in the open field. Early in 1900 the organized insurrection, which was chiefly confined to the Tagalog nationality, was broken up. Aguinaldo was driven into hiding, and reports of his death had persistent circulation. Later in the year, the insurgents, encouraged by the possible change of administration in the United States, actively renewed hostilities; but, discouraged by their repeated failures in their attacks on the American troops, and the news of the re-election of President McKinley, they began giving up the struggle and surrendering in large bodies to the American officers. Aguinaldo himself was captured by Gen. Frederick Funston (q. v.) on March 23, 1901, at his hiding-place in Palanan, Isabella Province, Luzon, and was immediately taken to Manila. He had been located by means of the capture of his secret cipher code in a drug-store in Manila, from which the insurgents had been furnished with medical supplies. As soon as his hiding-place was known, General
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bimetallism, (search)
nder equally with gold for all debts, public or private. The Democratic party nominated William Jennings Bryan (q. v.) for President, and he was defeated by William McKinley, the Republican nominee. An era of unexampled prosperity set in immediately after Mr. McKinley's election, and steadily increased during his first administMr. McKinley's election, and steadily increased during his first administration. In the party conventions of 1900 the Republicans gave a stanch support to the policy of the administration, especially on the complicated questions growing out of the war with Spain. and particularly on the one involving the future of the Philippine Islands: and the Democrats based their campaign chiefly on opposition to trusts and territorial expansion. The disposition of the Democratic leaders was to ignore entirely the silver question. The Republicans renominated President McKinley, and the Democrats Mr. Bryan, and the latter, in a remarkable tour of political speech-making, while dealing with the antitrust and imperialist features of the pl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blanco, Ramon Y Arenas, 1833- (search)
e North. He there made a brilliant record against the Carlists, and carried by storm peña Plata. For this achievement he was created Marquis de Peña Plata. In October, 1897, he succeeded Gen. Valeriano Weyler (q. v.) as governor-general of Cuba. One of his earliest acts after assuming authority there was a reluctant acquiescence in the desire of the people of the United States, as expressed by their Congress, to provide the reconcentrados with food, clothing, and medical supplies. President McKinley appointed a Central Cuban Relief Committee to raise funds for purchasing the various articles needed, and these were forwarded to the island and distributed under the direction of Clara Barton. When the Maine was blown up in the harbor of Havana, Blanco summoned the troops and firemen of the city to aid in the rescue of the survivors, and expressed Ramon Y Arenas Blanco. strong regrets on the appalling disaster. After the United States made the declaration of war, he assumed comm
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blockade. (search)
ly life lost on the Union side on that occasion. Captain Ward was the first naval officer killed during the war. His body was conveyed to the navy-yard at Brooklyn, where, on the North Carolina, it lay in state, and was then taken to Hartford, where imposing funeral ceremonies were performed in the Roman Catholic cathedral. In September, 1861, General McClellan was ordered to co-operate with the naval force on the Potomac River in removing the blockade, but he failed to do so; and it was kept up until the Confederates voluntarily abandoned their position in front of Washington in 1862. See Charleston, S. C.; Mobile, Ala.; Savannah, Ga.; Wilmington, N. C. On April 22, 1898, President McKinley proclaimed a blockade of all ports on the north coast of Cuba, between Cardenas and Bahia Honda (Havana being about midway between the two), and of the port of Cienfuegos, on the south coast, and kept a strong naval force there to enforce it. See Berlin decree, the; Cuba; orders in council.
the Boers to accede to a number of British claims which the Boers held to be without justification. In this war the Boer military leaders, Joubert, Cronje, Botha, and De Wet displayed a skill in manoeuvring that won the admiration even of their opponents. The death of Joubert and the surrender of Cronje were the severest shocks to the Boer cause up to the close of 1900. During the summer of 1900, General Lord Roberts. British commander-in-chief in South Africa, formally declared the annexation of the two republics, giving them the names of the Vaal River and Orange River colonies. About the same time a joint commission was appointed by the presidents of the two republics to visit the countries of Europe and also the United States for the purpose of securing intervention. In the United States they were received by President McKinley, wholly in the capacity of private visitors; were given a hearty welcome in several large cities; and had a subscription started to aid their cause.
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