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ructions for partisan warfare, though not executed with much vigor, met some success, as will appear hereafter. It were well for humanity and the Mormon name had their hostility been restricted to legitimate war; but who shall set bounds to religious hate? The chronic rancor against the Gentiles had been envenomed by the delirious reformation of the year before, and by the killing of the apostle Perley Pratt, in Arkansas. Pratt had seduced the wife and abducted the children of a man named McLean, who followed him from San Francisco to Arkansas, where he overtook and slew him in combat. Though Mormon common law justifies homicide as the penalty of adultery, the Gentile has not the benefit of the rule, and vengeance was denounced against the people of Arkansas. The new access of fury, stimulated by the approach of the troops, culminated in September, 1857, in an unparalleled atrocity. Robbery, outrage, and murder, had been the ordinary fate of the alien and the waverer, but the cli
must I fail to mention that Private W. E. Goolsby, Eleventh Regiment Virginia Volunteers, orderly to my headquarters since last June, repeatedly employed to carry my verbal orders to the field, discharged the duty with great zeal and intelligence. Other members of my staff were necessarily absent from the immediate field of battle, intrusted with responsible duties at these headquarters, namely: Captain F. H. Jordan, assistant adjutant-general, in charge of general headquarters; Major Eugene E. McLean, chief quartermaster; Captain E. Deslonde, Quartermaster's Department. Lieutenant-Colonel Ferguson, aide-de-camp, early on Monday, was assigned to command and direct the movements of a brigade of the Second Corps. Lieutenant-Colonel Gilmer, chief-engineer, after having performed the important and various duties of his place with distinction to himself and material benefit to his country, was wounded late on Monday. I trust, however, I shall not long be deprived of his essent
as I had done on the road from Corpus Christi to Laredo. I reached Fort Duncan in March, 1854, and was kindly received by the commanding officer of the regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Thompson Morris, and by the captain of my company ( D ), Eugene E. McLean, and his charming wife, the daughter of General E. V. Sumner, who was already distinguished in our service, but much better known in after years in the operations of the Army of the Potomac, during its early campaigns in Virginia. Shortl disorganized condition as often to invite attack from marauding Comanches and Lipans. Our time, therefore, was incessantly occupied in scouting, but our labors were much lightened because they were directed with intelligence and justice by Captain McLean, whose agreeable manners and upright methods are still so impressed on my memory that to this day I look back upon my service with D Company of the First Infantry as among those events which I remember with most pleasure. In this manner m
62.-skirmish near Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Reports. No. 1.-Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant, U. S. Army. No. 2.-Brig. Gen. William T. Sherman, U. S. Army. No. 3.-Col. Ralph P. Buckland, Seventy-Second Ohio Infantry. No. 4.-Maj. Elbridge G. Ricker, Fifth Ohio Cavalry. No. 5.-Maj. Gen. William J. Hardee, C. S. Army. No. 1.-report of Maj. Gen. U. S. Grant, U. S. Army. headquarters District of West Tennessee, Savannah, April 5, 1862. General: Just as my letter of yesterday to Captain McLean, assistant adjutant-general, was finished, notes from Generals McClernand's and Sherman's assistant adjutants-general were received, stating that our outposts had been attacked by the enemy, apparently in considerable force. I immediately went up, but found all quiet. The enemy took 2 officers and 4 or 5 of our men prisoners and wounded 4. We took 8 prisoners and killed several; number of the enemy wounded not known. They had with them three pieces of artillery and cavalry and infantr
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
g been convened by direction of the President, on the application of Lieut. Col. Eugene E. McLean, assistant quartermaster-general, under Special Orders, No. 282, pary of the Mississippi while under the control of Lieutenant-Colonel (then Major) McLean, and having made the required examination and report, the result is, by directi the summary of facts, regarded by the court of inquiry in the case of Lieut. Col. E. E. McLean as proved by the evidence elicited and of record- 1. That the ArmyArmy of the Mississippi while under the control of Lieut. Col. (then Maj.) Eugene E. McLean, it appears that the department was managed with all the energy, efficiench the departments of purchases of forage and of transportation, under Lieutenant-Colonel McLean; the original scarcity throughout the country of all supplies needed;r shown that in the conduct of the department committed to his charge Lieutenant-Colonel McLean was prompt, energetic, and efficient in the discharge of all the duti
nt of orders. Brig. Gen. J. E. Slaughter, acting inspector-general. Maj. Eugene E. McLean, Quartermaster's Department C. S. Army, in department of supplies and mneral. headquarters Army of the Mississippi, Corinth, April 8, 1862. Maj. [E. E. Mclean, Chief Quartermaster:] General Beauregard desires that you should call im. headquarters Army of the Mississippi, Corinth, Miss., April 24, 1862. Maj. E. E. Mclean, Chief Quartermaster: Major: Colonel Morgan is about starting on an imment. Brig. Gen. J. E. Slaughter, inspector-general's department. Maj. Eugene E. McLean, Quartermaster's Department C. S. Army, in department of supplies and mneral. headquarters Western Department, Corinth, Miss., May 12, 1862. Maj. Eugene E. Mclean: Major: The commanding general desires that you should take immediat Beauregard. headquarters Western Department, Corinth, May 25, 1862. Maj. Eugene E. Mclean, Chief Quartermaster Western Department: Major: Owing to the difficu
approach of the forces confronting him, was to retire slowly on Centreville, by the turnpike, then to Mitchell's Ford, drawing the enemy after him to that point, which was the only portion of General Beauregard's line yet fortified. General Ewell, from Sangster's Crossroads and vicinity, was to follow the line of the railroad over a rather rough and difficult country road to Union Mills Ford, where the position was naturally strong and offered good cover to his men. The intermediate fords, McLean's and Blackburn's, were at that time occupied by Jones's and Longstreet's brigades. Early's brigade, which had been watching the fords of the Occoquan and the approaches on the right, was now held in reserve, a short distance in rear of Union Mills Ford, to act according to circumstances. A small force of infantry guarded the stone bridge, on the extreme left, where the turnpike from Alexandria, through Fairfax Court-House and Centreville, crosses Bull Run, on its way to Warrenton. The wo
ich were his own, and the two others under Captain, afterwards Colonel, Robert T. Wood, of New Orleans, a grandson of General Zachary Taylor. into middle Tennessee and Kentucky; there to cause as much damage as possible to the enemy's railroads, bridges, and telegraph lines. He was authorized to raise his battalion to a regiment and even to a brigade, if he could. General Beauregard supplied him with a sum of fifteen thousand dollars, See, in Appendix, letter of General Beauregard to Major McLean, dated April 24th, 1862. to start with, and carry him into Kentucky, where he was, eventually, to live on the enemy. This was the beginning of the brilliant career of that intrepid partisan officer. His usefulness was afterwards greatly impaired when General Bragg attempted to make of him and his renowned brigade part of a regular command of cavalry. Upon the recommendation of General Beauregard, he was promoted to the rank of colonel before he had organized his regiment; and when he l
attached to the Army of the Potomac, were necessarily engaged severally with their responsible duties, at my headquarters at Camp Pickens, which they discharged with an energy and intelligence for which I have to tender my sincere thanks. Messrs. McLean, Wilcoxen, Kincheloe, and Branner, citizens of this immediate vicinity, it is their due to say, have placed me and the country under great obligations for the information relative to this region, which has enabled me to avail myself of its dery my verbal orders to the field, discharged the duty with great zeal and intelligence. Other members of my staff were necessarily absent from the immediate field of battle, intrusted with respective duties at their headquarters, viz.: Major Eugene E. McLean, Chief Quartermaster; Captain E. Deslondes, Quartermaster's Department. Lieutenant-Colonel Ferguson, A. D. C., early on Monday, was assigned to command and direct the movements of a brigade of the 2d corps. Lieutenant-Colonel Gilmer, C
must I fall to mention that Private W. E. Goolsby, 11th regiment Virginia Volunteers, Orderly to my Headquarters since last June, repeatedly employed to carry my verbal orders to the field, discharged the duty with great zeal and intelligence. Other members of my staff were necessarily absent from the immediate field of battle, entrusted with responsible duties at these headquarters, namely Capt. F. H. Jordan, Assistant Adjutant- General, in charge of General Headquarters. Major Eugene E. McLean, Chief Quartermaster, Capt. E. Deslonde, Quartermaster's Department. Lieut.- Col. Ferguson, A. D. C., early on Monday was assigned to command and direct the movements of a brigade of the 2d corps. Lieut. Col. Glimer, Chief Engineer, after having performed the important and various duties of his place with distinction to himself and material benefit to his country, was wounded late on Monday. I trust, however, I shall not long be deprived of his essential services. Capta