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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
e fleet, we have the advantage, he will make the signal for close action, No. 8, and abide the result, conquer or to be conquered, drop anchor or keep under way, as in his opinion is best. Lieutenant Thomas B. Huger, C. S N., in command of the McRae. from a photograph. Unless the signal above mentioned is made, it will be understood that the first order of sailing will be forced after leaving Fort St. Philip, and we will proceed up the river in accordance with the original opinion expreilip and Confederate iron-clad Louisiana. mortar-fleet in the distance. Mortar-steamers attacking water-battery, Fort Jackson. Farragut's division of the fleet, led by the Hartford. Richmond. Fort Jackson. Manassas, Confederate. Iroquois. McRae, Confederate. Confederate rams and sinking vessels. Rear vessel of Bailey's division. Farragut's first plan was to lead the fleet with his flag-ship, the Hartford, to be closely followed by the Brooklyn, Richmond, Pensacola, and Mississippi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
Charles H. Manning; 6th Mass. Battery, Capt. Charles Everett; 2d Vt. Battery, Capt. P. E. Holcomb. The strength of this command is reported at 6000 ( Official Records, Vol. VI., p. 708). The Confederate forces. Force afloat--Commander John K. Mitchell. name. 7-in. R. 9-in. S. B. 8-in. S. B. 32-pdr. R. 32-pdr. S. B. 24-pdr. 9-pdr. Howitzers. Total including Howitzers. naval vessels.                   Louisiana, Comr. Charles F. McIntosh (m w) 2 3 4 7         16 McRae, Lieut, Thos. B. Huger (m w)   1     6   1 Experimental gun.   8 Jackson (at Quarantine), Lieut. F. B. Renshaw         2       2 Manassas, Lieut. A. F. Warley         1 Carronade.       1 Launch No. 3, Acting Master Telford               1 1 Launch No. 6, Acting Master Fairbanks               1 1 Louisiana State Gun-boats                   Governor Moore, Lieut. Beverley Kennon       2         2 General Quitman
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Farragut below New Orleans. (search)
s moored above me; but the ground for this fear was soon removed, as, on getting near them, I saw that one had started for New Orleans, while the telegraph steamer Star, ram Quitman, and one other had been set afire at their berths on the right bank, and deserted before any of the enemy had reached them, and were burning brightly. They being in a clear space were in full view, and I was close to them. Another reason for leaving our berth directly under Fort St. Philip, where the Louisiana, McRae, and Manassas also lay, was to get clear of the cross-fire of the forts, and that of each ship of the enemy as they passed up close to us, for we sustained considerable damage and losses as we moved out into the stream. When we were turning at the head of the reach we found ourselves close to the United States steamer Oneida 10 guns with the United States steamer Cayuga, 4 guns, on our port beam. On being hailed with What ship is that? I replied, United States steamer Mississippi, to de
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
l. Joseph Mayo. Brigade loss not separately reported. Donaldsonville (La.) Battery (3 guns), Lieut. Lestang Fortier. Fourth division, Major-Gen. Daniel H. Hill (in command on the left). Early's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early (w), Col. D. K. McRae: 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae; 23d N. C., Col. John P. Hoke, Maj. Daniel H. Christie; 24th Va., Col. William R. Terry (w), Major Richard L. Maury; 38th Va., Lieut.-Col. Powhatan B. Whittle. Brigade loss (except 5th N. C., not reported): k, 3Col. D. K. McRae; 23d N. C., Col. John P. Hoke, Maj. Daniel H. Christie; 24th Va., Col. William R. Terry (w), Major Richard L. Maury; 38th Va., Lieut.-Col. Powhatan B. Whittle. Brigade loss (except 5th N. C., not reported): k, 30; w, 106; m, 70=206. Rodes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Rodes: 5th Ala., Col. C. C. Pegues; 6th Ala., Col. John B. Gordon; 12th Ala., Col. R. T. Jones; 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor. Rains's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. G. J. Rains: 13th Ala., Col. B. D. Fry; 26th Ala., Col. E. A. O'Neal; 6th Ga., Col. A. H. Colquitt; 23d Ga., Col. Thos. Hutcherson. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 27th Ga., Col. Levi B. Smith; 28th Ga., Col. T. J. Warthen; 4th N. C., Col. George B. Anderson; 49th Va.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
ut.-Col. Stephen F. Hale; 10th Ala., Maj. J. J. Woodward; 11th Ala., Col. Sydenham Moore (m w); 19th Miss., Maj. John Mullins. Brigade loss: k and w, 110. Colston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Colston: 13th N. C.; 14th N. C.; 3d Va. Pryor's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roger A. Pryor: 8th Ala.; 14th Ala.; 14th La. Hill's division, Maj.-Gen. Daniel H. Hill. Garland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel Garland, Jr.: 2d Fla., Col. E. A. Perry; 2d Miss. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. John G. Taylor; 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae, Maj. P. J. Sinclair; 23d N. C., Col. Daniel H. Christie, Lieut.-Col. R. D. Johnston (w); 24th Va., Maj. Richard L. Maury (w); 38th Va., Col. E. C. Edmonds; Ala. Battery, Capt. J. W. Bondurant. Brigade loss: k, 98; w, 600; in, 42 = 740. Rodes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Rodes (w), Col. John B. Gordon: 5th Ala., Col. C. C. Pegues; 6th Ala., Col. John B. Gordon ; 12th Ala., Col. R. T. Jones (k), Lieut.-Col. B. B. Gayle; 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor; 4th Va. Battalion, Capt. C. C. Otey (
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
n; 12th Ala., Col. B. B. Gayle; 26th Ala., Col. E. A. O'Neal; Va. Battery (King William Arty.), Capt. Thomas H. Carter. Brigade loss: k, 112; w, 458 == 570. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George B. Anderson (w), Col. C. C. Tew: 2d N. C., Col. C. C. Tew; 4th N. C., Col. E. A. Osborne; 14th N. C., Lieut.-Col. William A. Johnston; 30th N. C., Col. Francis M. Parker; Ala. Battery, Capt. R. A. Hardaway. Brigade loss: k, 159; w, 704-863. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel Garland, Jr.: 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae; 12th N. C., Col. Benjamin C. Wade; 13th N. C., Col. Alfred M. Scales; 20th N. C., Col. Alfred Iverson (w), Lieut.-Col. Franklin J. Faison (k), Maj. William H. Toon; 23d N. C., Col. Daniel H. Christie (w), Lieut. I. J. Young (w); Ala. Battery (Jeff Davis Arty.), Capt. J. W. Bondurant. Brigade loss: k, 192; w, 637; m, 15 == 844. Fourth Brigade, Col. Alfred H. Colquitt: 13th Ala., Col. Birkett D. Fry; 6th Ga., Lieut.-Col. J. M. Newton; 23d Ga., Col. Emory F. Best; 27th Ga., Col. Levi B.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
ry into a solid column of attack, Lee might have cut a way through the five-fold force of his antagonist, but all the trains must have been lost,--an irreparable loss to the South. Frederick the Great's campaign against the allies shows what he would have done had he been in command of the Federal army. But the American soldier preferred to do sure work rather than brilliant work, his natural caution being increased by the carping criticisms of his enemies. Upon the fall of Garland, Colonel McRae, of the 5th North Carolina regiment, assumed command, and ordered the two regiments on the left to close in to the right. This order either was not received or it was found to be impossible of execution. The main attack was on the 23d North Carolina behind the stone-wall. The Federals had a plunging fire upon this regiment from the crest of a hill, higher than the wall, and only about fifty yards from it. The 12th North Carolina, a badly trained regiment, on that day under the command
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
J. N. Lightfoot (w): 12th Ala., Col. B. B. Gayle (k); 26th Ala., Col. E. A. O'Neal (w). Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 61; w, 157; m, 204 = 422. Antietam, k, 50; w, 132; m, 21 = 203. Garland's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel Garland, Jr., (k), Col. D. K. McRae (w): 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae, Capt. Thomas M. Garrett; 12th N. C., Capt. S. Snow; 13th N. C., Lieut.-Col. Thomas Ruffin, Jr. (w), Capt. J. H. Hyman; 20th N. C., Col. Alfred Iverson; 23d N. C., Col. Daniel H. Christie. Brigade loss: SoutCol. D. K. McRae, Capt. Thomas M. Garrett; 12th N. C., Capt. S. Snow; 13th N. C., Lieut.-Col. Thomas Ruffin, Jr. (w), Capt. J. H. Hyman; 20th N. C., Col. Alfred Iverson; 23d N. C., Col. Daniel H. Christie. Brigade loss: South Mountain and Antietam, k, 46; w, 210; m, 187 = 443. Anderson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George B. Anderson (m w), Col. R. T. Bennett (w): 2d N. C., Col. C. C. Tew (k), Capt. G. M. Roberts; 4th N. C., Col. Bryan Grimes, Capt. W. T. Marsh (k), Capt. D. P, Latham (k); 14th N. C., Col. R. T. Bennett, Lieut.-Col. William A. Johnston (w); 30th N. C., Col. F. M. Parker (w), Maj. William W. Sillers. Brigade loss: South Mountain and Antietam, k, 64; w, 229; m, 202 = 565. Colquitt's Brigade, Col. A. H. Colq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
to Generals Williams and Greene.--Editors. But the fighting of Hooker's and Mansfield's men, though lacking unity of force and of purpose, had cost the enemy dear. J. R. Jones, who commanded Jackson's division, had been wounded; Starke, who succeeded Jones, was killed; Lawton, who followed Starke, was wounded. Ewell's division, commanded by Early, had suffered hardly less. Hood was sent back into the fight to relieve Lawton, and had been reenforced by the brigades of Ripley, Colquitt, and McRae (Garland's), from D. H. Hill's division. When Greene reached the Dunker Church, therefore, the Confederates on that wing had suffered more fearfully than our own men. Nearly half their numbers were killed and wounded, and Jackson's famous Stonewall division was so completely disorganized that only a handful of men under Colonels Grigsby and Stafford remained and attached themselves to Early's command. Of the division under Early, his own brigade was all that retained much strength, and thi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Canby's services in the New Mexican campaign. (search)
ntimates that all went well on the field until Canby arrived. Such was not the case. Roberts had failed to dislodge the enemy from his strong position behind the sand hills. Had it not been for the fatal gap in our center, the Texan assault on McRae's battery could not have been made, as the attacking column would have been taken in flank by our center. That gap was caused by Colonel Miguel Pino's 2d New Mexican Regiment remaining under the river-bank and refusing to move forward into line.s. First, speaking of the fighting in the morning he says: The day wore on with more noise than execution, until 2 P. M. As a matter of fact our losses in the morning were heavier than in the evening, when most of the casualties were confined to McRae's Battery. Also Mr. Greeley states: Our supporting infantry, twice or thrice the Texans in number, and including more than man for man of regulars, shamefully withstood every entreaty to charge, and the Colorado volunteers vied with the regulars
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