Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for George C. Meade or search for George C. Meade in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
nt by which, in the autumn of 1863, he flanked Meade out of his position at Culpeper, and forced hi Longstreet to the west. And when in December Meade crossed the Rapidan and established himself acas repaired — the situation seemed to Grant or Meade to justify a renewal of those clashes of solidrty, and something to eat. Visit from General Meade. Of a different kind, and far more pleause it relates to a visit we had from General George C. Meade. My mother, who still lives a vigoroot in the programme. After he discounted, General Meade, followed by one of his staff, also my mot. In no way was there anything wanting in General Meade's generosity as a man, kindness as a frienoffices, and the soldierly bearing of General George C. Meade. Instead now of hate, war, and deaard each other, would, if successful, have cut Meade's army in twain. His superior numbers and hiswall Jackson alive, Gettysburg would have been Meade's Waterloo. Colonel Herbert and Major Golds[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The life and character of Robert Edward Lee. (search)
ander had reason to believe, which afterwards turned out to be true, that he had out-manoeuvered Meade, and that his full concentration was confronted by only a portion of the latter's army. This wallustrating Lee's offensive strategy is the movement by which, in the autumn of 1863, he flanked Meade out of his position at Culpeper, and forced him back into the lines at Centreville, and this, tormy had been depleted one-third by the dispatch of Longstreet to the west. And when in December Meade crossed the Rapidan and established himself across the roads leading from Orrange Courthouse to position against great odds until the lost time was repaired — the situation seemed to Grant or Meade to justify a renewal of those clashes of solid lines upon well-manned earthworks to which the Fe fatal miscarriage of provisions ordered to meet the army en route. The delay so caused brought Meade upon his rear, and enabled Sheridan's hard riders to reach his flank. The disaster at Sailor's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
ir Plunder—Searching for Bev. Tucker— personal recollections of General Meade. The following personal reminiscences of the evacuation of Rre left to life, liberty, and something to eat. Visit from General Meade. Of a different kind, and far more pleasant is the last thin. More pleasant because it relates to a visit we had from General George C. Meade. My mother, who still lives a vigorous old lady—though shnder Mr. Polk, and was related to or connected by marriage with General Meade. They had known each other well before the war, but, of coursem happy to say, was not in the programme. After he discounted, General Meade, followed by one of his staff, also my mother's cousin, came onation to Philadelphia. In no way was there anything wanting in General Meade's generosity as a man, kindness as a friend, sympathy as a relane visit, the goodly offices, and the soldierly bearing of General George C. Meade. Instead now of hate, war, and death, we have faith, ho<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Maryland Warrior and hero. (search)
, like Pickett's men, they charged into defeat and death. The analogy is plainer, because the respective charges of Pickett's division and Steuart's brigade, in directions about opposite, moving toward each other, would, if successful, have cut Meade's army in twain. His superior numbers and his earthworks saved him. Were Stonewall Jackson alive, Gettysburg would have been Meade's Waterloo. Colonel Herbert and Major Goldsborough were among five or six hundred Confederate officers, prisoneMeade's Waterloo. Colonel Herbert and Major Goldsborough were among five or six hundred Confederate officers, prisoners of war, who were placed within range of the Confederate batteries at Charleston, S. C., during the fierce Federal assault on that city; suffering many hardships and privations, having often killed and eaten cats and other animals! What could have been more cowardly and despicable than such treatment to such heroes! Colonel Herbert's exchange was effected, but Major Goldsborough remained a prisoner until the war was over. Soon after the war Major Goldsborough established the Winchester,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
fired the shot which struck down the great commander of the Western army, Albert Sidney Johnston, and thus turned victory for our arms into defeat. Evidently it was the guiding hand of the great unseen Architect of Nations who brought the Monitor into the waters of the Chesapeake to grapple in deadly conflict with the Merrimac for the supremacy of the seas. And we concede that it was He who delayed Ewell's coming until the heights of Gettysburg were crowned with the Federal army under General Meade, and thus pitted the impregnable mountains against the fierce assaults of the cohorts of Lee under the gallant and daring Pickett. It was never intended by the Divine Hand that this nation as a nation should perish from the earth. On the contrary, cemented by the blood of its bravest and best, it was foreordained that it should continue to live, to bless and guide the nations of the earth. And I have no doubt that the time will come when this great republic as a nation will feel proud
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Chapter, in C. S. History, The, 844. McCaleb, Hon. E. H., 3. McClellan, General G B., 102, 287. McDonald, Major E. H 163. McGuire, Dr Hunter, 99, 336. Magruder, General John B., 198. Manassas, Second Battle of, 305. Marietta, Ga., Burning of, 198. Marshall, Colonel, Charles, 172. Maryland Line, C. S. A 88; Monument to, 132; 247; Bazaar held by Ladies of, 132; supplied with arms by Virginia, 163; battery, 227. Massachusetts regiment, 6th, in Baltimore in 1861. 214. Meade, General George C, 162. Mechanicsville Battle of, 302. Miles, General N. A., Cruelty of, 51. Milroy, General R. H., Order of, 105. Monroe Doctrine The, 187. Moore, Surgeon-General, Samuel Preston, Sketch of, 273. Morris Island, Confederate States prisoners under fire of own men at, 231. Nashville, Confederate States steamer, Cruise of, 207. Negro Troops in Federal army, 232. North Carolina Cavalry, 5th, Gallantry of,—Troops how armed, 144; Troops in Confederate Sta