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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 3 1 Browse Search
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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
ting-Chief, J. D. Williamson; Acting-First-Assistant, D. L. King; Acting-Second-Assistants, J. Pollard and F. V. Holt; Acting-Third-Assistants, A. C. Crocker, I. H. Fuhr, G. W. Young, D. Gilliland and E. J. Cram; Acting-Gunner, E. P. Palmer. Mattabessett--Third-rate. Commander, John C. Febiger: Lieutenant, A. N. Mitchell; Acting-Masters, J. L. Plunkett and John Fountain; Acting-Ensigns, John Greenhalgh, F. H. Brown and A. F. Dill; Acting-Assistant Surgeon. S. P. Boyer; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. C. Meade; Acting-Master's Mates, A. M. Beck and C. F. Fisher; Engineers: Second-Assistants, J. T. Hawkins, A. Sackett and C. J. McConnell; Third-Assistants, W. A. Mintzer, A. B. Bates and Isaiah Paxson; Acting-Gunner, Wm. H. Herring. Massasoit--Third rate. Commander, R. T. Renshaw; Lieutenant, Geo. W. Sumner; Acting-Masters, H. Reany, C. F. Taylor and W. C. Williams; Acting-Ensigns, R. Rabadan and Chas. Wilson; Acting-Master's Mate, G. A. Burt; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. R. L
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 51: effects of the fall of Fort Fisher, and criticisms on General Badeau's military history of General Grant. (search)
Butler; for, as repeatedly shown, although Grant was entirely satisfied with that officers zeal and general ability, he was convinced that he lacked some qualities essential in a commander in the field. Grant did not pronounce, but he felt certain, that the peculiar talent of a successful general was not possessed by the Commander of the James. He therefore directed Butler to place Weitzel in command of the expedition, and had, in fact, committed to Butler movements in support of those of Meade, which he intended should detain him in Bermuda Hundred. Nevertheless, he did not now forbid Butler to accompany Weitzel. It was difficult thus to affront a commander of such high rank unless it was intended to relieve him entirely from command, and this Grant was not prepared to do without consulting the Government, which he knew would dislike and perhaps forbid the step. He fancied, besides, that Butler's object might be to witness the explosion of the powder-boat — in which he took g